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You searched for +publisher:"National University of Ireland – Galway" +contributor:("Golden, Aaron"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Ó Broin, Pilib. Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience .

Degree: 2014, National University of Ireland – Galway

The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has fundamentally changed modern genomics re-search. These sequencers generate terabytes of data and necessitate the use, not only of high-performance compute (HPC) clusters for data processing and storage, but also of intelligent, scalable algorithms for pattern discovery and data mining. This thesis details the development of infrastructure and algorithms which automate much of this data analysis process allowing bench biologists to remain focused on the scientific questions that drive them, rather than the informatics challenges associated with these new platforms. We describe WASP, one of the first end-to-end systems to handle all aspects of NGS data generation, including sample submission, laboratory information management system (LIMS) functionality, and assay-specific processing pipelines. Furthermore, we present two machine learning algorithms for the secondary analysis of ChIP-seq data, the first, based on the use of self-organising maps (SOMs) for improved de novo motif discovery, and the second, which uses genetic algorithms (GAs) to automatically cluster transcription factor binding motifs. Finally, we present an application of this infrastructure and these techniques to the study of the role of the TBX1 transcription factor in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, examining its putative role in neural development, adult neurogenesis, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia. Advisors/Committee Members: Golden, Aaron (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Machine learning; High-performance computing; Next-generation sequencing; Autism; Neuroscience; Mathematics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ó Broin, P. (2014). Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience . (Thesis). National University of Ireland – Galway. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ó Broin, Pilib. “Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience .” 2014. Thesis, National University of Ireland – Galway. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ó Broin, Pilib. “Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience .” 2014. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Ó Broin P. Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience . [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ó Broin P. Machine learning and high-performance computing: Infrastructure and algorithms for the genome-scale study of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms with applications in neuroscience . [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


National University of Ireland – Galway

2. Fergus, Alan. The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement.

Degree: 2010, National University of Ireland – Galway

The phenomenon of particle transport in turbulent flows has been studied extensively using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) over the past few decades. One of the most useful DNS approaches is Lagrangian simulation. Lagrangian simulations of particles in turbulent flows have provided much information regarding particle deposition to surfaces and particle-turbulence interactions. Because individual particle trajectories are calculated in Lagrangian simulations, details of particle motion are accessible that are unattainable by experiment, thus making Lagrangian Modelling a highly powerful tool in particle transport simulation. A Computational Fluid Dynamic program called OpenFOAM[1] is used as a base and modified to incorporate particle-surface interactions, bounce and re-entrainment. To model such behaviour, particles¿ potential functions for a population of particles are developed, governing sticking and re-entrainment of particles. When a particle strikes a surface using most existing models, the particle adheres to the surface (perfect sink). In this work, there are two outcomes that occur which are dependent on the velocity of the particle when its impacts with the surface. At a low impact velocity the particle adheres, but as the impact velocity increases, the particle may bounce if the velocity of impact is greater than a critical velocity Vcr defined as Vcr=(2Ea/M)(1/2) where m is the mass of the particle, Ea = Em + Es is the surface adhesion as detailed by Johnson et al. (1971)[2], and is the sum of the mechanical potential energy Em and the surface adhesion energy Es. While the phenomenon of resuspension has been studied extensively on its own, very little work has been carried out that included resuspension in a standard Lagrangian model. In the present work, the critical velocity is calculated and if the critical velocity is less than the velocity of the flow at the position of the particle, the particle is resuspended into the flow at a velocity dependent on the particle properties and energy remaining after the particle has overcome the adhesion energy. To validate the presented theory, three test cases were chosen. The first test case was based on the experimental deposition data for 33-36 micron particles, collected by Paw and Braaten (1992)[3],. It is evident that the simulated Vcr is well within the values of ideal deposition and net deposition as presented by Paw and Braaten (1992)[3]. The second test case was based on the simulated work of Li and Ahmadi (1993)[4], who examined bounce for 1-10 micron particles and obtained a critical approach velocity above which particles bounced. When the critical approach velocity is compared with Vcr, it is clear that there is very good agreement for particle sizes above 4 µm. The final test case chosen was a sand transport simulation. When the sand in freefall test case is examined, it is found that the settling velocity agrees well with those values presented by Fentie et al. (2004)[5] and the spatial distribution in this… Advisors/Committee Members: Byrne, Miriam (advisor), Golden, Aaron (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Lagrangian Simulation Bounce Resupension Particle Movement

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fergus, A. (2010). The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement. (Thesis). National University of Ireland – Galway. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4885

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fergus, Alan. “The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement. ” 2010. Thesis, National University of Ireland – Galway. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4885.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fergus, Alan. “The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement. ” 2010. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Fergus A. The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement. [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4885.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fergus A. The Integration of Bounce and Resuspension into a Lagrangian Simulation of Particle Movement. [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/4885

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Harding, Leon Karl. The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond .

Degree: 2012, National University of Ireland – Galway

In recent years, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, together known as ultracool dwarfs, have unexpectedly been detected as a radio transient source, where periodic bursts of radio emission were also discovered. Periodicity has subsequently been detected in H-alpha and other photometric data from a number of these objects. It remained unclear whether this periodic behavior was related to the presence of the periodic pulsed radio emission. This thesis investigates this possible connection, and presents multi-epoch periodic photometric variability from a lengthy campaign encompassing six radio detected ultracool dwarfs, spanning the ~M8 - L3.5 spectral range. These include the M tight binary dwarf LP 349-25AB and L tight binary dwarf 2MASS J0746+2000AB, as well as the M8.5 dwarf LSR J1835+3259, the M9 dwarf TVLM 513-46546, the M9.5 dwarf BRI 0021-0214, and the L3.5 dwarf 2MASS J0036+18. Five of these dwarfs exhibit periodic photometric variability, where three of these are newly discovered. One other shows persistent variability, with the possibility of periodicity detected in the data. This work was primarily carried out using the GUFI photometer (Galway Ultra Fast Imager), an instrument commissioned during this campaign to specifically detect optical signatures from these objects, currently stationed on the 1.83 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope, on Mt. Graham, Arizona. We sought to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in both quiescent and time-variable radio detected ultracool dwarfs. The periodic variability is associated with the rotation of the dwarf in all cases and we consider a number of causal photospheric phenomena, including magnetic cool spots and atmospheric dust. An exciting alternative may associate the periodic variability with chromospheric auroral hot spots directly related to the previously discovered periodic radio emission. One dwarf in this study is part of this larger study, and we present the photometric results possibly associated with this phenomenon. In addition to the search for optical signatures from these ultracool dwarfs, and based on the newly discovered rotation periods for the binary dwarfs, we investigate the orbital coplanarity of LP 349-25AB and 2MASS J0746+2000AB. We find that in both cases, the inclination angle of the binary spin axes are consistent with being aligned perpendicularly to the system orbital planes to within 10 degrees, as observed for solar-type binary formation. We consider a number of formation mechanisms for such an alignment, including turbulent core fragmentation, disk fragmentation, multiple formation via competitive accretion and dynamical interactions. For 2MASS J0746+2000AB, we have estimated individual component masses and radii based on evolutionary models, which place the binary system at, or just below, the substellar boundary, and at ~1 Jupiter radius. This is the first direct evidence of spin-orbit alignment in the very low mass binary regime. In supplementary work, we conducted high-speed photometric monitoring… Advisors/Committee Members: Golden, Aaron (advisor), Butler, Ray F (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: stars: binary systems, brown dwarfs, low mass; stars: dust, rotation, magnetic cool spots, magnetic hot spots; stars: magnetic activity, magnetic fields; stars: periodic variability, phase stability; stars: binary star formation; stars: spin-orbit alignment, very low mass binaries; stars: M dwarf flaring, loop oscillation events; Centre for Astronomy; School of Physics; Optics; Astronomical Instrumentation; Stars; Binary systems; Brown Dwarfs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harding, L. K. (2012). The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond . (Thesis). National University of Ireland – Galway. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3609

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harding, Leon Karl. “The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond .” 2012. Thesis, National University of Ireland – Galway. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3609.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harding, Leon Karl. “The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond .” 2012. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Harding LK. The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond . [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3609.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harding LK. The Optical Signatures of Magnetospheric Phenomena at the End of the Main Sequence and Beyond . [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3609

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.