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NSYSU

1. Vitaly, Vasilev. Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade.

Degree: Master, Mainland China Studies, 2008, NSYSU

To observers who are not indifferent toward Russia, the trend of Russiaâs foreign policy clearly is disquieting, if not alarming. The titanic efforts made by the Russian ruling establishment to enter the mighty G-7 club appear now to be a waste of time and energy. Feeling itself a stranger within the G-8, Russia seems to be trying to establish an international club (Shanghai Cooperation Organization) of its own with it at the head it (China-Russia military exercise in Central Asia) . There is nothing reprehensible in any countryâs quest to normalize relations with its neighbors and from that point of view Mikhail Gorbachevâs visit to China in 1989, this was a good start in the process of burying the past thirty years of open confrontation between the two countries. The hostility between the two nations saw, time and time again, armed border clashes and skirmishes. Boris Yeltsinâs government willingly took the baton from his predecessor but carried it in an unlikely direction. In 1992, Russian opened the flow of military hardware and know-how to China by selling 24 fighters Su-27s. 2 At that time, Russia did not appear to harbor any thoughts of China as a potential ally and regarded the giant neighbor as a very solvent buyer of its armaments â mainly of old Soviet surpluses rather than really new material. However, China soon made it clear that it wanted only first-rate merchandise, and proved to be a tough negotiator and shrewd buyer. 3 Historically, military contracts between Russia and China were implemented on the basic of more or less special agreements and could not be viewed as part of a larger political strategy although Boris Yeltsinâs proactive diplomacy toward China (armed largely at counterbalancing âNATOâs move eastwardâ) created a fertile field for what followed in the early 2000s. Trade was driven, on the Chinese side, by Chinaâs willingness to acquire quite sophisticated weapons at a very reasonable price and by Russiaâs willingness to sell anything to anybody just to keep the production lines going and to convince its highly-qualified specialists to stay put. Despite friendly rhetoric from both sides and the rather hefty military sales by Russia, immediate military cooperation was not on the agenda at that time. The whole picture of bilateral ties between Moscow and Beijing began changing with Putinâs rise. Naturally, along the path to the revival of Russiaâs past âgreatnessâ Putin chose a very definite company of fellow travelers and staked his presidency on an eventual estrangement from the West. The turning point in Chinese-Russian relations came on July 16, 2001, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese counterpart Jiang Zemin, aspiring to forge a ``new international order' and offset U.S. influence, signed the first post-Soviet friendship Treaty for Good Neighborliness, Friendship and Cooperation, between the two nations, cementing their decade-long partnership which opened the way to increase arms deliveries. Jiang said after the signing ceremony in the Kremlin, that âit was a milestone in… Advisors/Committee Members: Lin , Wen-cheng (chair), Lin , Wen-cheng (committee member), Lin, Zheng-yi (chair), Chen, Jing-nan (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Implications for Taiwan; China - USA axis; Arms Trade

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APA (6th Edition):

Vitaly, V. (2008). Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0804108-110110

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vitaly, Vasilev. “Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade.” 2008. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0804108-110110.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vitaly, Vasilev. “Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade.” 2008. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Vitaly V. Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2008. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0804108-110110.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vitaly V. Russia-China MIlitary Arms Trade. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2008. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0804108-110110

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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