Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"NARCIS" +contributor:("U. van Meeteren"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Nijsse, J. Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum.

Degree: 2001, NARCIS

Cut flowers show a wide variance of keepability. The market demands more and more a guaranteed quality. Therefore, methods must be developed to predict vase life of cut flowers. Chrysanthemum ( Dendranthema x grandiflorum Tzvelev) and some other cut flowers suffer from unpredicted early leaf wilting during vase life. Researchers from Wageningen University and from the Research Station for Floriculture and Glasshouse Vegetables started a joint project to investigate the problem of early leaf wilting and to come to a better prediction of vase life of cut flowers. Preliminary experiments pointed out that early leaf wilting is caused by a decrease of the water uptake due to embolisms that are induced at the cut surface. This thesis reflects a part of the project on early leaf wilting and is focussed on the anatomical aspects of the stem water transport system. Chrysanthemums are propagated by stem cuttings, which grow in about 12 weeks to commercial maturity. Flowering is induced by a short day treatment. Cut chrysanthemums have an erect stem and the leaves are helically arranged along the stem. The primary vessel bundle network was elucidated, revealing that leaves have their direct water supply from different vascular bundles, which are positioned around nearly half of the circumference of the stem (2.1). The xylem water transport system consists of primary xylem and secondary xylem. The older the stem part (i.e. the lower in the stem) the higher the relative amount of secondary tissue. Digital image analysis procedures were constructed to enable the quantification of large amounts of anatomical data. Xylem vessel characteristics along the chrysanthemum stems were thus quantified and a mathematical description of the vessel characteristics was developed (2.2). Hydraulic conductivity, amount of vessels, average diameter of vessels, and vessel length all showed a gradual exponential decrease from the base to higher up the stem. The hydraulic resistivity calculated from vessel lumina was 30% lower than the experimentally measured resistivity, irrespective of the position in the stem. The remaining 30% is at least partly caused by the resistance of the intervessel pits. A new theory was developed to explain the regulation of vessel lengths in plants (2.3). Vessel length depends on the amount of fused tracheary elements. The only assumption in the theory is that each element has the same chance to be the end of the vessel during vessel formation. This results in an exponential vessel length distribution, which indeed is always found in our chrysanthemum stems. The plant can thus determine its vessel length distribution by just steering the chance factor. This theory provides the most simple mechanism that enables plants to regulate the length of xylem vessels. Stochastic regulation of biological processes might be widely present in nature. We reviewed and refined a method to obtain flat planes in all desired directions through frozen hydrated (biological) specimens (Chapter 3). A… Advisors/Committee Members: Wageningen University, O. van Kooten, U. van Meeteren, C.J. Keijzer.

Subjects/Keywords: plantenanatomie; wateropname (planten); stofverplaatsing; water; plant-water relaties; snijbloemen; chrysanthemum; vaasleven; plant anatomy; water uptake; translocation; water; plant water relations; cut flowers; chrysanthemum; vase life

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nijsse, J. (2001). Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum. (Doctoral Dissertation). NARCIS. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nijsse, J. “Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, NARCIS. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nijsse, J. “Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum.” 2001. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Nijsse J. Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. NARCIS; 2001. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607.

Council of Science Editors:

Nijsse J. Functional anatomy of the water transport system in cut chrysanthemum. [Doctoral Dissertation]. NARCIS; 2001. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-109607 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/109607

2. Cunha Costa, da, J.M.R. The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose.

Degree: 2002, NARCIS

<em> Key words</em> : Rosa hybrida , cut-rose, propagation, cuttings, leaf, rooting, root initiation, root growth, axillary primary shoot, severance, photosynthesis, carbohydrates, reduced sink activity, planting material, quality <FONT FACE="Arial" SIZE=2> The present study aims at better understanding the relation between photosynthesis of the original leaf, carbohydrates, rooting and growth of single node leafy stem cuttings of rose. This knowledge can be used to improve success and efficiency in propagation and improving the uniformity of the planting material of cut roses derived form cuttings. The effects of the original leaf area on the growth of cuttings of Rosa hybrida Madelon ®were investigated during the first 10 weeks after severance. Total plant dry weight, and dry weight of the roots in particular, were proportionally related with the original leaf area of cuttings. When leaf area was modified, leaf area duration was linearly related to the rooting and growth of cuttings during the first 21 days of propagation. The presence of the leaf during the first week of propagation was critical for survival and its removal caused stem rot. This was caused by low carbohydrate concentrations. Cuttings remained photosyntheticaly active after severance. Photosynthetic rates decreased immediately after severance, but recovered up to 70% of the rates measured on leaves on mother plants and remained constant during propagation. The PSII efficiency decreased during propagation with a simultaneous increase in its heterogeneity across the leaflets (patchiness) which may be attributed to decreased sink activity rather then to water stress. The root and shoot tissues accounted for about 70% of the increase in total fresh weight after 21 days of propagation, whereas the remaining 30% increase was due to dry weight accumulation in the leaf and stem. About 55% of the dry weight accumulated consisted of carbohydrates, in particular starch, which accumulated mainly in the first 14 days in leaves and stem tissues (pith and medullar rays). This accumulation may be explained by reduced meristematic sink activity following severance. In fact, the newly formed roots and primary shoot after 21 days of propagation only represented 10% of the total dry weight of cuttings. Reduced light integrals and low CO 2 concentrations resulted in reduced rooting and growth of cuttings and decreased carbohydrate levels. Number of roots, and particularly, dry weight of roots, were linearly related with total dry weight accumulation during the 21 days of propagation showing that photosynthetic activity of cuttings during propagation influences both root initiation and growth. The effects of low light, low CO 2 concentration, and leaf area reduction on rooting and growth of cuttings were similar indicating that these effects could be explained to a great extent by photosynthesis. Growth in general depended on the length of the period… Advisors/Committee Members: Wageningen University, H. Challa, M.T.M. Willemse, U. van Meeteren, P.A. van de Pol, C.J. Keijzer.

Subjects/Keywords: rosaceae; rozen; stekken; bladeren; wortels; beworteling; stengels; fotosynthese; groei; plantengroeiregulatoren; bladoppervlakte; plantenvermeerdering; voedingsstoffenreserves; Snijbloemen; rosaceae; roses; cuttings; leaves; leaf area; roots; rooting; stems; photosynthesis; growth; plant growth regulators; propagation; nutrient reserves; Cut Flowers

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cunha Costa, da, J. M. R. (2002). The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose. (Doctoral Dissertation). NARCIS. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cunha Costa, da, J M R. “The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose.” 2002. Doctoral Dissertation, NARCIS. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cunha Costa, da, J M R. “The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose.” 2002. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Cunha Costa, da JMR. The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. NARCIS; 2002. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391.

Council of Science Editors:

Cunha Costa, da JMR. The role of the leaf on the dynamics of growth and rooting of leafy stem cuttings of rose. [Doctoral Dissertation]. NARCIS; 2002. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-317391 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/317391

.