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You searched for +publisher:"Montana State University" +contributor:("Joseph C-Y Wang, Ethan J. Edwards, Heini M. Miettinen, Amanda L. Le Sueur, Megan C. Thielges , Adam Zlotnick and Trevor Douglas were co-authors of the article, \'Redesign of a virus particle for NADH-driven hydrogen production\' which is contained within this dissertation."). One record found.

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1. Jordan, Paul Campion. Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials.

Degree: College of Letters & Science, 2016, Montana State University

Biology has designed a suite of compartments and barriers that confine fundamental biochemical reactions. Such barriers include the membrane-bound organelles but also a suite of protein-based compartments that architecturally and chemically integrate catalytic processes. These compartments co-polymerize from multiple protein subunits to form polyhedral structures that spatially separate enzymatic processes. Protein compartments confine volatile intermediates, trap toxic reaction products, and co-localize multiple enzymatic processes for catalytic enhancements. The protein-based compartments represent, advantageously, a combination of form and function that has inspired the synthesis of new, designer materials. The self-assembly of cage-like structures, the structures of which are reminiscent of the compartments, has been used for the directed encapsulation of active enzymes. We have used the capsid from bacteriophage P22, as a nanocontainer for directing the encapsulation of a variety of gene products, including active enzymes. The P22 capsid assembles from a coat protein (CP) and a scaffold protein (SP) which templates its assembly. Using the simplicity of the P22 expression system, a strategy was developed and implemented for the directed encapsulation of an active, [NiFe] hydrogenase. We hypothesized and proved the enzyme active site needed to be matured by accessory proteins found within the expression host. A two plasmid expression system was designed, where the hydrogenase cargo was under the control of a different inducer than the P22 CP. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase is a heterodimer and each enzyme subunit was fused to different SP. The resultant packaging of the two SP fusions, with the hydrogenase large and small subunits fused to them stabilized a weak heterodimeric structure. Remarkably, the stabilizing effects of the capsid allowed us to probe the infrared signatures associated with the hydrogenase active site. Finally, the progress made here in developing a virus capsid for H2 production left room to build increased complexity into the P22-Hydrogenase system while also taking inspiration from the innate, biological function of the hydrogenase. We incorporated a cytochrome/cytochrome reductase pair to drive H 2 production using NADH. These designs, built at the molecular level, represent inherently renewable catalysts that pave the way for a new era of catalytic materials synthesized entirely by biology. Advisors/Committee Members: Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Trevor Douglas (advisor), Dustin P. Patterson, Kendall N. Saboda, Ethan J. Edwards, Heini M. Miettinen, Gautam Basu, Megan C. Thieleges and Trevor Douglas were co-authors of the article, 'Self-assembling biomolecular catalysts for hydrogen production' in the journal 'Nature chemistry' which is contained within this dissertation. (other), Joseph C-Y Wang, Ethan J. Edwards, Heini M. Miettinen, Amanda L. Le Sueur, Megan C. Thielges , Adam Zlotnick and Trevor Douglas were co-authors of the article, 'Redesign of a virus particle for NADH-driven hydrogen production' which is contained within this dissertation. (other), This dissertation contains one article of which Paul Campion Jordan is not the main author. (other).

Subjects/Keywords: Viruses.; Catalysis.; Bioengineering.; Hydrogenase.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jordan, P. C. (2016). Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials. (Thesis). Montana State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13800

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jordan, Paul Campion. “Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials.” 2016. Thesis, Montana State University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13800.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jordan, Paul Campion. “Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials.” 2016. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Jordan PC. Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials. [Internet] [Thesis]. Montana State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13800.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jordan PC. Biological redesign of virus particles for a new era of catalytic materials. [Thesis]. Montana State University; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13800

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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