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You searched for +publisher:"Mississippi State University" +contributor:("Julia Porter"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. McCaskill-Mitchell, Sonja V. THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

Degree: PhD, Leadership and Foundations, 2009, Mississippi State University

The purpose of the study was to identify factors that affect whether or not students persist in completion of the GED. Exploration of characteristics of participants that do/do not persist and obtain their GED not only assists the high school dropout, potential GED recipient, and GED program staff, but also society as a whole. More information was needed in order to effectively address issues that adversely affect students enrolled in GED programs at rural community colleges. Therefore, examination of the GED programs student database contributed in finding factors that both help and impede student success. Factors identified were investigated in an effort to assist in the retention of future participants in the GED program. The subjects of this study consisted of 976 students enrolled in the GED program at a rural community college. The data utilized were archived data, so there was no direct contact with subjects. The data were provided by the GED staff via charts and spreadsheets of student files and records (i.e. demographic sheet information, entry tests-locator test or TABE test, pre-GED testing, exit tests-GED, etc.). A discriminant function analysis was utilized in this study. This was done by weighting the variables and combining them into discriminant functions that separate the groups maximally. The discriminating variables were considered as predictor variables and the group membership variables were considered as dummy criterion variables. Also, a quantitative, non-experimental design was employed to show the direction and magnitude of the relationships between independent variables. The essential features of the design were the abilities to find associations, relate variables, and make predictions. The variables of age, race, gender, employment, public assistance, rural, single parent, and entry/exit levels significantly discriminated into the following groups at a 59.5% rate of accuracy: (1) GED completion, (2) GED continuation, and (3) GED dropouts. Also, age, race, gender, entry level, and rural had a significant impact on persistence/GED completion. With respect to age, it was revealed that older participants were more apt to persist and complete the GED program. White and black participants completed at higher rates than Asian and Hispanic participants. While males completed at higher rates than females. Participants with higher entry levels (4, 5, and 6) completed the program at higher rates. The majority of rural participants completed the GED program. Advisors/Committee Members: James E. Davis (chair), William M. Wiseman (committee member), Lavinia Sparkman (committee member), Julia Porter (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: GED; community college; rural; persistence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCaskill-Mitchell, S. V. (2009). THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292009-102211/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCaskill-Mitchell, Sonja V. “THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed July 22, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292009-102211/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCaskill-Mitchell, Sonja V. “THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE.” 2009. Web. 22 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

McCaskill-Mitchell SV. THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2009. [cited 2019 Jul 22]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292009-102211/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

McCaskill-Mitchell SV. THE LEVEL OF PERSISTENCE IN HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUTS ENROLLED IN THE GED PROGRAM AT A RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2009. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292009-102211/ ;


Mississippi State University

2. Nunnery, Rosanne. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Educational Psychology, 2011, Mississippi State University

What a counselor-in-training believes about his or her ability directly impacts his/her persistence and ability to perform a task successfully. Evidence shows a link between academic factors and counselor self-efficacy with trainees who perform better academically being more confident in their ability to counsel. In addition, there is a strong probability that part of a trainee‟s belief system and subsequent behavior choices are connected with his or her total wellness. Having a higher self-efficacy can improve counselor competence and give insight into the gatekeeping process. Because there is limited research to address academic factors and total wellness of counseling self-efficacy (CSE) of counselors-in-training (CIT), this study concentrates on the gap in the educational and counseling literature. This research documents the extent to which these variables can contribute to the prediction of CSE of CIT. Specifically, academic factors, wellness and CSE of CIT were assessed across randomly selected CACREP accredited master‟s-level counseling programs. Liaisons were contacted, provided a description of the study, and invited to ask any questions related to their students‟ involvement in the study. Those who agreed to allow participation in their program were asked to forward an email introducing the study and requesting participation to counseling practicum and internship students at their institution. In the email, potential participants were provided with directions for accessing and completing the survey, contact information for the researcher, and approximate deadline for completion. Each participant was asked to complete a consent form, a demographic questionnaire, the 5F-Wel, and the Counselor Activity Self Efficacy Scale. There were 2 hypotheses considered in this study. First, a significant relationship will exist between academic factors and the CSE of CIT. This hypothesis was not supported. A significant relationship will exist between the total wellness score and the CSE of CIT. Regression analysis revealed that the complete model including all 5 predictor variables did not significantly predict CSE of CIT. This model accounted for only 6 % of the variance of CSE of CIT. Thus, this hypothesis was not supported. These findings indicate the need for additional research to examine which factors contribute to the CSE of CIT. Advisors/Committee Members: Joshua C. Watson (chair), Matthew Boggan (committee member), Charles Palmer (committee member), Julia Porter (committee member), Debbie Wells (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: wellness; self-efficacy; counseling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nunnery, R. (2011). AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03092011-143653/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nunnery, Rosanne. “AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed July 22, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03092011-143653/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nunnery, Rosanne. “AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING.” 2011. Web. 22 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Nunnery R. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 22]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03092011-143653/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Nunnery R. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS AND ACADEMIC FACTORS OF COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY OF COUNSELORS-IN-TRAINING. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2011. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03092011-143653/ ;


Mississippi State University

3. Lemon, Jan Cummins. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Educational Psychology, 2010, Mississippi State University

High school dropout continues to be an issue of national concern, and the inability of educators and researchers to find means of effectively reducing the dropout rate may be grounded in their approach to understanding this issue. Because there is limited prior research in addressing wellness, perceived stress, and mattering in relationship to at-risk status for dropping out of high school, this study concentrates on the gap in the educational and counseling literature documenting the extent to which these variables can contribute to the prediction of students who are at risk of dropping out of high school. Specifically, wellness, perceived stress, mattering, and at-risk status for dropping out of high school were assessed across 175 students attending a medium-sized high school located in the southeastern part of the United States. Parental informed consent documents and adult student consent documents were obtained primary to gathering data. Packets were administered to each participating student containing a minor assent document to be completed by minor students and removed by adult students, a demographic questionnaire, the Five Factor Wellness Inventory-Teenage Version, the Student At-Risk Identification Scale-Student Questionnaire, the General Mattering Scale, and the Perceived Stress Scale. There were 2 hypotheses considered in this study. First, a significant relationship was posited between the 5 second-order variables of wellness, perceived stress, mattering, and at-risk status for dropping out of high school. This hypothesis was supported with all variables correlating significantly. Second, an overall regression model with 7 predictors (the 5 second-order factors of wellness: creative self, coping self, social self, essential self, and physical self; perceived stress; and mattering) was expected to significantly predict at-risk status for dropping out of high school. Regression analysis revealed that the complete model including all seven predictor variables significantly predicted at-risk status for dropping out of high school, <i>F</i>(7, 167) = 12.89, <i>p</i> < .05. This model accounts for 35.1% of the variance in at-risk status for dropping out of high school. Thus, this hypothesis also was supported. These findings indicate that counselors should utilize skills and interventions that help students stay engaged in the academic process. Advisors/Committee Members: Joshua C. Watson (chair), Rufus Hare (committee member), Charles Palmer (committee member), Julia Porter (committee member), Joe Ray Underwood (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: high school dropout; mattering; wellness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lemon, J. C. (2010). AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06252010-174245/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lemon, Jan Cummins. “AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed July 22, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06252010-174245/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lemon, Jan Cummins. “AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL.” 2010. Web. 22 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Lemon JC. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jul 22]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06252010-174245/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Lemon JC. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG WELLNESS, PERCEIVED STRESS, MATTERING, AND AT-RISK STATUS FOR DROPPING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06252010-174245/ ;

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