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You searched for +publisher:"Mississippi State University" +contributor:("Eric Samuel Winer"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Salem, Taban. An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2018, Mississippi State University

The present study was aimed at experimentally investigating effects of causal explanations for depression on treatment-seeking behavior and beliefs. Participants at a large Southern university (N = 139; 78% female; average age 19.77) received bogus screening results indicating high depression risk, then viewed an explanation of depression etiology (fixed biological vs. malleable) before receiving a treatment referral (antidepressant vs. psychotherapy). Participants accepted the cover story at face value, but some expressed doubts about the screening tasks ability to properly assess their individual depression. Within the skeptics, those given a fixed biological explanation for depression were relatively unwilling to accept either treatment, but those given a malleable explanation were much more willing to accept psychotherapy. Importantly, differences in skepticism were not due to levels of actual depressive symptoms. The present findings indicate that information about the malleability of depression may have a protective effect for persons who otherwise would not accept treatment. Advisors/Committee Members: Eric Samuel Winer (chair), Cliff McKinney (committee member), Michael R. Nadorff (committee member), Jennifer C. Veilleux (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: psychotherapy; treatment expectancies; help-seeking; causal explanations; depression

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salem, T. (2018). An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292018-104132/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salem, Taban. “An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292018-104132/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salem, Taban. “An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment.” 2018. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Salem T. An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292018-104132/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Salem T. An experimental investigation of causal explanations for depression and willingness to accept treatment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292018-104132/ ;


Mississippi State University

2. Wu, Sining. Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2015, Mississippi State University

The present study examined whether an individuals own implicit theory of relationships predicts how s/he perceives his/her friends romantic relationship. Implicit theories of relationships are based on destiny beliefs (DB), the belief that a relationship is meant to be, and growth beliefs (GB), the belief that relationships require work. Each participant was randomly exposed to one of three relationship scenarios where the participants hypothetical friend discusses a partner displaying negative, mixed, or positive relationship behaviors. We found the participants high in DB were less approving of the relationship, and those high in GB were more approving. Those high in DB also made more relationship-damaging attributions when asked to select reasons why the partner engaged in said behaviors but surprisingly perceived the couple as more satisfied overall. Anticipated interactions between DB and GB were not found. Advisors/Committee Members: Eric Samuel Winer (committee member), Carolyn E. Adams-Price (chair), H. Colleen Sinclair (chair), Kristina B. Hood (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords:

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wu, S. (2015). Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships. (Masters Thesis). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292015-015033/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wu, Sining. “Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Mississippi State University. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292015-015033/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wu, Sining. “Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships.” 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Wu S. Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292015-015033/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Wu S. Destined to fail or something to grow on? Examining the relationship between implicit theories of relationships and perceptions of others romantic relationships. [Masters Thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2015. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06292015-015033/ ;

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