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You searched for +publisher:"Mississippi State University" +contributor:("Dr. Keisha Walters"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Wynne, Paul Zachary. Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, School of, 2014, Mississippi State University

Pyrolysis oil is known to be unstable due to polycondensation reactions that negatively affect properties, such as increased viscosity and water content, lower heating values, and phase separation. Filtration of particulates and solid content out of the pyrolysis oil has been proven to increase stability, thus a filtration system was designed for pilot scale testing for the Mississippi State University Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC). A literature review was conducted to determine potentially effective methods and eliminate methods likely to not improve the pyrolysis oil properties and stability. An in-line centrifuge system was identified as a useful and cost effective way to remove solids from the pyrolysis oil with an added benefit of potentially removing water content through a three-phase separation configuration. Lab-scale testing of centrifugation on pyrolysis oil indicated both two phase (solid + oil phases) and three phase (solid + aqueous phase + oil phases) separations could be obtained depending on feedstock and pyrolysis oil characteristics, and that centrifugation was a viable option for the removal of solid content. KiOR, Inc. pine clear wood derived pyrolysis oil (formerly known as ReCrude) was characterized to determine physicochemical properties in comparison to literature results. Aging tests were also performed to investigate stability. In comparison with literature data, the properties for the KiOR product indicated significantly lower water content, particulate matter loading, and viscosity coupled with higher heating and pH values, indicating a product much closer in composition to fossil fuel oils than other pyrolysis oils. The KiOR ReCrudeM oil also demonstrated a much higher degree of stability versus other pyrolysis oils; however, there are still some stability issues with the aged samples resulting in slightly higher water content and viscosity values and lower heating and pH values. It is recommended that stability testing (aging) be performed on aliquots separated using a method such as rotary evaporation to more accurately determine what mechanisms are resulting in the properties changes observed over time in response to elevated temperature and/or pressure. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Keisha Walters (chair), Dr. Bill Elmore (committee member), Dr. Todd French (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: pyrolysis oil; stability testing; bio-oil characterization; centrifuge filtration; FTIR; GPC; rheology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wynne, P. Z. (2014). Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing. (Masters Thesis). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-04042014-120553/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wynne, Paul Zachary. “Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Mississippi State University. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-04042014-120553/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wynne, Paul Zachary. “Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing.” 2014. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Wynne PZ. Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-04042014-120553/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Wynne PZ. Processing pyrolysis oil: pilot plant scale centrifugal filtration and stability testing. [Masters Thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2014. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-04042014-120553/ ;


Mississippi State University

2. Srivastava, Soumya Keshavamurthy. DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, School of, 2010, Mississippi State University

<p class=Basictextdouble-spaced>Medical lab work, such as blood testing, will one day <span class=GramE>be</span> near instantaneous and inexpensive via capabilities enabled by the fast growing world of <span class=SpellE>microtechnology</span>. In this research study, sorting and separation of different ABO blood types have been investigated by applying alternating and direct electric fields using <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoresis</span> in <span class=SpellE>microdevices</span>. <span class=GramE>Poly(</span><span class=SpellE>dimethylsiloxane</span>) (PDMS) <span class=SpellE>microdevices</span>, fabricated by standard photolithography techniques have been used. Embedded perpendicular platinum (Pt) electrodes to generate forces in AC <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoresis</span> were used to successfully distinguish positive ABO blood types, with O+ distinguishable from other blood types at >95% confidence. This is an important foundation for exploring DC <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoretic</span> sorting of blood types. <p class=Basictextdouble-spaced>The expansion of red blood cell sorting employing direct current <span class=SpellE>insulative</span> <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoresis</span> (DC-<span class=SpellE>iDEP</span>) is novel. Here Pt electrodes were remotely situated in the inlet and outlet ports of the <span class=SpellE>microdevice</span> and an insulating obstacle generates the required <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoretic</span> force. The presence of ABO antigens on the red blood cell were found to affect the <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoretic</span> deflection around the insulating obstacle thus sorting cells by type. To optimize the placement of insulating obstacle in the <span class=SpellE>microchannel</span>, COMSOL <span class=SpellE>Multiphysics</span>® simulations were performed. <span class=SpellE>Microdevice</span> dimensions were optimized by evaluating the behaviors of fluorescent polystyrene particles of three different sizes roughly corresponding to the three main components of blood: platelets (2-4 µm), erythrocytes (6-8 µm) and leukocytes (10-15 µm). This work provided the operating conditions for successfully performing size dependent blood cell insulator based DC <span class=SpellE>dielectrophoresis</span> in PDMS <span class=SpellE>microdevices</span>. <span style='color:black'>In subsequent studies, the optimized <span class=SpellE>microdevice</span> geometry was then used for continuous separation of erythrocytes</span>. The <span class=SpellE>microdevice</span> design enabled erythrocyte collection into specific channels based on the cells deflection from the high field density region of the obstacle. The channel with the highest concentration of cells is indicative of the ABO blood type of the sample. <p class=Basictextdouble-spaced>DC resistance measurement system for quantification of erythrocytes was developed with single PDMS <span class=SpellE>microchannel</span> system to be integrated with the DC-<span class=SpellE>iDEP</span> device… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Adrienne Minerick (chair), Dr. Bill Elmore (committee member), Dr. Keisha Walters (committee member), Dr. Jagdish P. Singh (committee member), Dr. Shane Burgess (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: dielectrophoresis; ABO blood typing; DC dielectrophoresis; Microdevice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Srivastava, S. K. (2010). DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07092010-174859/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Srivastava, Soumya Keshavamurthy. “DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07092010-174859/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Srivastava, Soumya Keshavamurthy. “DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES.” 2010. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Srivastava SK. DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07092010-174859/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Srivastava SK. DIELECTROPHORETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLES AND ERYTHROCYTES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07092010-174859/ ;

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