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You searched for +publisher:"Mississippi State University" +contributor:("Donna Peterson"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Osman, Nesma Osama Abdelrahman. Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers.

Degree: MS, Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of, 2018, Mississippi State University

This study documented the experiences of agricultural workers with disabilities currently using assistive technologies (ATs) through one states AgrAbility Project. Comparisons between work life before and after their use of ATs were made. Moreover, this study explored motivational factors for continuing agricultural work using the Job Characteristics Model as a conceptual framework. The study used a qualitative approach with a purposive sampling method to ensure participants met specific criteria (born with or acquired a disability, diversity of disabilities, and use of AT for at least one year). Seven participants (two females and five males) completed a questionnaire and were interviewed by telephone. Data were analyzed based on thematic analysis using a deductive approach. The results showed that ATs had a mostly positive influence on disabled agricultural workers work life and work motivation. The implications of the study for future research and recommendations for practical application were provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Susan Seal (committee member), Laura Downey (committee member), Donna Peterson (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: AgrAbility Project; Farm; Assistive Technology; Disabled Agricultural Workers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Osman, N. O. A. (2018). Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers. (Masters Thesis). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03152018-185022/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osman, Nesma Osama Abdelrahman. “Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Mississippi State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03152018-185022/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osman, Nesma Osama Abdelrahman. “Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers.” 2018. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Osman NOA. Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03152018-185022/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Osman NOA. Work motivation before and after using assistive technology by disabled agricultural workers. [Masters Thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2018. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03152018-185022/ ;


Mississippi State University

2. Turner, Joshua J. Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties.

Degree: PhD, Human Sciences, School of, 2017, Mississippi State University

The continued growth of the nations older adult population will bring many societal challenges. One of these challenges deals with meeting this populations basic needs. Among the most crucial basic needs in older adulthood is proper nutrition, which is heavily impacted by ones ability to access adequate amounts of healthy foods. Extensive research has been conducted on low food access among diverse populations, but opportunities remain to expand upon this research by concentrating on the food access challenges facing the older adult population. The current study had a two-fold purpose. First, this study aimed to serve a basic academic purpose by integrating key elements of theories related to environmental gerontology and ecological models of aging and human development to explain the relationship between summary-level conditions and the food environments of older adults, particularly as they were related to food access in nonmetropolitan counties. Second, this study aimed to serve an applied-evaluative purpose by utilizing the results of the quantitative analysis to serve as an initial needs assessment that identified the characteristics of nonmetropolitan counties that were associated with higher levels of senior low food access. It was argued that the ability to identify counties facing high levels of senior low food access would aid in the development of interventions to help address this social problem. To this end, this studys concluding sections proposed an initial logic model, which outlined an intervention designed to address low food access among older adults residing in nonmetropolitan counties. Support was found for several of the research hypotheses, with results indicating that a countys proportion of minority residents and status as a high outmigration county were the two strongest predictors of a countys status as a senior low food access county. Based on these results, an intervention was proposed that concentrated on educating older adults on the importance of nutrition in older age and facilitating more convenient access to food outlets for older adults in nonmetropolitan counties. Practical implications for this study and suggestions for future research related to this topic also were discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Joe D. Wilmoth (chair), Tommy M. Phillips (committee member), Donna Peterson (committee member), Carolyn E. Adams-Price (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: low food access; seniors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Turner, J. J. (2017). Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172017-125708/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turner, Joshua J. “Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172017-125708/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turner, Joshua J. “Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties.” 2017. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Turner JJ. Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172017-125708/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Turner JJ. Senior food environments: Predicting low food access and developing interventions for seniors in nonmetropolitan counties. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2017. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172017-125708/ ;


Mississippi State University

3. Mays, Carla J. Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge.

Degree: PhD, Human Sciences, School of, 2018, Mississippi State University

This dissertation contains two secondary quantitative data analyses studies. In the first, implementation of the <i>WannaBee Healthy? Be Smart! Be Active! Be a Leader!</i> health science curriculum was examined to expand understanding about teacher usage of an integrated health curriculum. Specifically, researchers assessed the amount of activities within each curriculum domain (i.e., books, creative expressions, language/literacy, math, science) and the number of activities within each theme of the lessons (i.e., nutrition, physical activity, sleep) utilized by participating teachers. Prior to implementation, teachers (<i>N</i> = 68; M age = 35.5 years old) attended a one-hour training where use of the curriculum and supplemental material toolkit were exhibited. Participants were instructed to implement the curriculum over the course of a month and directed to record lessons implemented on a teacher usage checklist, indicating a Y+ if they taught the lesson and would likely teach it again, a Y- if they taught the lesson, but would not likely teach it again, and an N if the lesson was not implemented. An overall total number of activities and a total number of activities within each curriculum domain (e.g., language/literacy) and within each theme (e.g., nutrition) was calculated using a frequency analysis. Results show that more than 20% of reporting teachers (<i>n</i> = 10; 21.8%) implemented all or almost all (i.e., 49 or 50 lessons) of the curriculums 50 activities. Children had more exposure to the book domain and the theme of nutrition, with less engagement in the domain of math and sleep-themed lessons. Based on the results of the first study, the second study examined the association between the dosage of the <i>WannaBee Healthy?</i> curriculum implementation within each classroom (i.e., frequency use of curriculum domains; frequency use of lesson themes) and child health knowledge outcomes (e.g., USDA MyPlate accuracy). Explicitly, is the dosage and type of content implementation directly associated with students gain in knowledge and the ability to successfully identify the following: (1) food from each of the five food groups, (2) healthy plate that includes all recommended food groups, (3) food origins, (4) four activities that increase heart rate, and (5) sleep, healthy plate, and physical activity as behaviors needed to keep our body healthy. Researchers utilized the information from the teacher usage checklist to determine dosage and content implementation of lessons. Pre- and post-assessments were randomly conducted on 252 pre-kindergarten (17.9%) and kindergarten (82.1%) students (M age = 5.02) whose parents had provided consent. Pearson correlations identified strong, positive correlations regarding implementation across the curriculum and within the domains and themes. A series of One-way ANOVAs were conducted, identifying a significance in outcomes of at least one child assessment and in both health themes (i.e., nutrition, physical activity). However, overall findings indicate that curriculum… Advisors/Committee Members: Lori Elmore-Staton, Ph.D. (chair), Julie Parker, Ph.D. (committee member), Donna Peterson, Ph.D. (committee member), Angel Herring, Ph.D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: health habits; health science curriculum; obesity; early childhood

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mays, C. J. (2018). Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172018-115023/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mays, Carla J. “Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172018-115023/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mays, Carla J. “Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge.” 2018. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Mays CJ. Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172018-115023/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Mays CJ. Health science curriculum for early childhood: Teacher implementation and impact on child health knowledge. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-10172018-115023/ ;

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