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You searched for +publisher:"Mississippi State University" +contributor:("Carmen Reisener"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Bush, Margaret Carol. An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Educational Psychology, 2014, Mississippi State University

An important reading skill that is often overlooked by educators is reading fluency. There is a paucity of studies that have investigated computer programs that address this and other critical reading skills. Reading Assistant is a form of computer-assisted instruction that uses speech recognition technology and research supported strategies to target reading fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of Reading Assistant on the oral reading fluency and comprehension skills of second through third grade students considered at-risk for reading failure. A total of eight participants were involved in this study across a 6- to 8-week intervention period. In order to evaluate the impact of Reading Assistant, a multiple baseline across participants design was used. Multiple sources of data were collected to determine the overall effectiveness of the Reading Assistant computer program. Data for reading fluency was collected using AIMSweb reading curriculum based measurement (CBM) probes while data for reading comprehension was collected using AIMSweb maze CBM probes. The effect of the Reading Assistant computer program was also evaluated by determining the rate of improvement (ROI) as well as by calculating the percentage of non-overlapping data points (PND). The results of this study suggest that Reading Assistant may have been somewhat effective for improving the oral reading fluency and reading comprehension skills, but only for some of the participants. The effect size data do not provide a convincing demonstration that Reading Assistant had a substantial impact on the majority of struggling readers involved in this study. Further research is needed to establish the effectiveness of Reading Assistant as an intervention for reading fluency. Advisors/Committee Members: Carlen Henington (chair), Carmen Reisener (committee member), Kent Coffey (committee member), Cheryl Justice (committee member), Tawny McCleon (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: school psychology; reading comprehension; reading fluency; reading

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bush, M. C. (2014). An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06302014-084615/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bush, Margaret Carol. “An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed November 20, 2018. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06302014-084615/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bush, Margaret Carol. “An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students.” 2014. Web. 20 Nov 2018.

Vancouver:

Bush MC. An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2014. [cited 2018 Nov 20]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06302014-084615/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Bush MC. An investigation of the effects of a computer-assisted reading program on the oral reading fluency and comprehension of elementary students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2014. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06302014-084615/ ;


Mississippi State University

2. Medley, Meagan Boyd. Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Educational Psychology, 2014, Mississippi State University

This study examined teacher perceptions of an intervention including a daily behavior report (DBRC) with a measure of treatment integrity present (Experimental Group) and without a measure of treatment integrity present (Control Group) The study was conducted in an analog (i.e., vignettes) online format with teacher participants from a southeastern school district. Each participant was presented with a vignette describing a student with problem classroom behaviors, a summary functional behavior assessment, and a sample behavior intervention plan including a DBRC. Only the Experimental Group was then presented with a direct observation measure of treatment integrity correlating to the DBRC. All teacher participants then rated the intervention using the Usage Rating Profile-Intervention (URP-I). On average teachers evaluated both the DBRC intervention with and without a treatment integrity component positively (i.e., means ranged from slightly agree to agree across all measures). A t-test indicated that no statistically significant differences existed between the Experimental and Control Groups total scores on the URP-I. This indicated that the measure of treatment integrity did not impact teachers ratings of the intervention on the URP-I. A MANOVA procedure found no statistically significant differences in teachers ratings of the intervention using each of the four factor scores of the URP-I (i.e., Acceptability, Understanding, Feasibility, and Systems Support). A multiple regression procedure used to examine various raters demographic characteristics found no statistically significant predictability for URP-I scores based on race, grades taught, years experience, and teaching setting (special/gifted versus general education). Cautious generalizations should be made due to limitations including the analog nature of the study, limited geographical area and participant characteristics. Additionally, the URP-I, a direct observation treatment integrity checklist, and a behavior intervention plan with an emphasis on a DBRC were all used. Use of other variables such as different interventions, rating scales and treatment integrity measures should be investigated. Suggestions for future research include conducting similar lines of research in naturalistic settings with school teachers and children, continued research in the different ways to collect treatment integrity research, and conducting acceptability and teacher perception research for other behavior interventions, target behaviors, and with other teacher groups. Advisors/Committee Members: Carlen Henington (chair), Anastasia D. Elder (committee member), Cheryl A. Justice (committee member), Tawny E. McCleon (committee member), Carmen Reisener (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: treatment integrity; daily behavior report card; fidelity; acceptability; social validity; URP-I; usage; behavior intervention plan; functional behavior assessment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Medley, M. B. (2014). Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07012014-182821/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Medley, Meagan Boyd. “Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed November 20, 2018. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07012014-182821/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Medley, Meagan Boyd. “Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure.” 2014. Web. 20 Nov 2018.

Vancouver:

Medley MB. Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2014. [cited 2018 Nov 20]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07012014-182821/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Medley MB. Teacher ratings of a daily behavior report card with or without a treatment integrity measure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2014. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07012014-182821/ ;

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