Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Michigan Technological University" +contributor:("Rupak M. Rajachar"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Michigan Technological University

1. Snyder, Katherine Lynn. Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2013, Michigan Technological University

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have emerged in an effort to generate replacement tissues capable of restoring native tissue structure and function, but because of the complexity of biologic system, this has proven to be much harder than originally anticipated. Silica based bioactive glasses are popular as biomaterials because of their ability to enhance osteogenesis and angiogenesis. Sol-gel processing methods are popular in generating these materials because it offers: 1) mild processing conditions; 2) easily controlled structure and composition; 3) the ability to incorporate biological molecules; and 4) inherent biocompatibility. The goal of this work was to develop a bioactive vaporization system for the deposition of silica sol-gel particles as a means to modify the material properties of a substrate at the nano- and micro- level to better mimic the instructive conditions of native bone tissue, promoting appropriate osteoblast attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as a means for supporting bone tissue regeneration. The size distribution, morphology and degradation behavior of the vapor deposited sol-gel particles developed here were found to be dependent upon formulation (H2O:TMOS, pH, Ca/P incorporation) and manufacturing (substrate surface character, deposition time). Additionally, deposition of these particles onto substrates can be used to modify overall substrate properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and topography. Deposition of Ca/P sol particles induced apatite-like mineral formation on both two- and three-dimensional materials when exposed to body fluids. Gene expression analysis suggests that Ca/P sol particles induce upregulation osteoblast gene expression (Runx2, OPN, OCN) in preosteoblasts during early culture time points. Upon further modification-specifically increasing particle stability-these Ca/P sol particles possess the potential to serve as a simple and unique means to modify biomaterial surface properties as a means to direct osteoblast differentiation. Advisors/Committee Members: Rupak M Rajachar.

Subjects/Keywords: Bioglass; Nanoparticles; Osteoblasts; Sol-Gel; Surface modification; Vapor Deposition; Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Snyder, K. L. (2013). Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/624

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Snyder, Katherine Lynn. “Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan Technological University. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/624.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Snyder, Katherine Lynn. “Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Snyder KL. Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/624.

Council of Science Editors:

Snyder KL. Development of Vapor Deposited Silica Sol-Gel Particles for a Bioactive Materials System to Direct Osteoblast Behavior. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/624


Michigan Technological University

2. Pinnaratip, Rattapol. EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL.

Degree: MS, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2017, Michigan Technological University

Cell infiltration is one of the most important characteristics of a degradable and bioactive biomaterial. Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG), as one of the most commonly used polymer in medicine, also faces such problems. This issue also prevalence in PEG derivatives such as poly (ethylene glycol)-glutaric acid-dopamine (PEG-GA-DM) which is a versatile bioadhesive. As a promising bioadhesive system that can be used and modified to suit various type of applications, modification to overcome cellular infiltration and degradation issues will help further expand the usefulness of the material in tissue repair application. The degradation issue is already preliminary solved by introducing ester linkage through carboxylic acid functionalization via glutaric acid incorporation. However, the resulting degradation rate is still not ideal. To further modify the porosity, pore structure, and degradation rate of the polymer, various types of non-crystalline silica particles were introduced into the polymer network. The benefit of including silica particles into the gel system may not limited only to the degradation and pore structure. One of the most interesting effects that this ceramic material may contain is its ability to release silica byproduct, specifically hydrolyzed silica or orthosilicic acid. Orthosilicic acid was proved to positively affect collagenous extracellular matrix formation as well as improves keratin and collagen based organ’s health. Using various formulations, a number of PEG-GA-DA and silica composite improvements were investigated. The silica’s contributions to a number of changes include shortened gelation time, increased mechanical strength, faster initial degradation, higher structural stability after degradation, and, ultimately, change in porous structure. It is interesting that PEG-GA-DA silica composite not only provided improvement for the PEG network but also provide benefit for innate property of silica particle. With silicic acid as degraded product, the composite also facilitates extracellular matrix formation as well as therapeutic macrophages recruitment. Advisors/Committee Members: Rupak M. Rajachar, Bruce P. Lee.

Subjects/Keywords: Silica particle; PEG; adhesive; bioactive material; poly(ethylene glycol); Biomaterials; Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering; Other Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Polymer Science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pinnaratip, R. (2017). EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL. (Masters Thesis). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/534

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pinnaratip, Rattapol. “EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Michigan Technological University. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/534.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pinnaratip, Rattapol. “EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL.” 2017. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Pinnaratip R. EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Michigan Technological University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/534.

Council of Science Editors:

Pinnaratip R. EFFECT OF SILICA MICRO/NANO PARTICLES INCORPORATION OVER BIOINSPIRED POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)-BASED ADHESIVE HYDROGEL. [Masters Thesis]. Michigan Technological University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/534


Michigan Technological University

3. Pinnaratip, Rattapol. STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2020, Michigan Technological University

Mussel adhesive proteins contain catechol moiety, which allows the protein to crosslinked, solidify, and adhere to surrounding surfaces even under wet conditions. Incorporating the catechol moiety into polymeric adhesive resulted in bioadhesive, which still functions under wet conditions. However, the adhesive must be oxidized in order to crosslink and adhere to surfaces. The oxidation process of catechol adhesive was proven to produce singlet oxygen, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These reactive oxygen species, with lack of control, can wreak havoc to the biological system causing poor healing and undesired biological response. Here, we studied the silica particle system as a means to control H2O2 concentration. After an exploratory investigation on silica particle synthesis and modification, acid-treated silica particle (AHSi) was developed with a highly hydrophilic surface. We then explore the use of reinforcement phase incorporation, creating particle-adhesive composites and studied the effect which the particle incorporation imparts into the adhesives. The model adhesive is polyethylene glycol functionalized with glutaric acid and dopamine, creating a biodegradable adhesive hydrogel. We demonstrated that incorporation of a model particle, silica particle, into a catechol adhesive resulting in a mechanically stronger adhesive with an increase in stiffness, adhesion strength, and structural integrity even after partially degraded. Moreover, the composite adhesive was gelled faster and degrade slower than native PEG-DA adhesive. The composite also demonstrated a reduction in the concentration of H2O2. The particle not only reduces H2O2 but also found to be releasing soluble silica in a biologically relevant concentration further improve their bioreactivity. The silica nanoparticle incorporated catechol-based composite demonstrated a reduction in cytotoxicity on rat dermal fibroblast, human keratinocyte, and human tenocyte, three types of cells that react differently to elevated oxidative stress. Interestingly, all cell types have demonstrated an increase in cell proliferation, raising the possibility of developing the composite adhesive further. The last part of the study involved a prediction model that helps narrow down the formulation to be tested in vivo. Full-thickness dermal wound model in mice was utilized to study the predicted formulation. The results from the animal model suggested that PEG adhesive alone can alter the biological response with accelerated wound healing. However, the incorporation of AHSi proved to successfully bridge the gap between accelerated wound healing and better wound remodeling. This dissertation describes various strategies used to tune the H2O2 concentration released from catechol adhesives to tune its biological response which involved silica particle modification with minimal change in chemical composition, and the selection of adhesive… Advisors/Committee Members: Bruce P. Lee, Rupak M. Rajachar.

Subjects/Keywords: Silica Particle; Wound Healing; Controlled Release; Catechol Adhesive; Hydrogen Peroxide; Composite Adhesive; Biomaterials

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pinnaratip, R. (2020). STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/1044

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pinnaratip, Rattapol. “STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan Technological University. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/1044.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pinnaratip, Rattapol. “STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES.” 2020. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Pinnaratip R. STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/1044.

Council of Science Editors:

Pinnaratip R. STUDY OF SILICA NANOPARTICLE COMPOSITE ON SILICA-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE COMPLEXATIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN CATECHOL BASED ADHESIVES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2020. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/1044

.