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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Waltzer, Kenneth"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. McCurties, Elise. Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left.

Degree: 2011, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. History 2011.

Children of the Old Left were leading participants in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left. These activists were raised in families involved in the Socialist Party, the Communist Party and its affiliate organizations, non-Communist trade unions, and other leftist groups. During their childhood these individuals often participated in their parents' political activities and many developed their own organizations to support Old Left causes. Like their parents, young leftists were persecuted for their activism during the McCarthy period. Red Diaper Babies (RDBs), children raised by parents associated with the Communist movement, and their peers from other Old Left organizations were followed by FBI agents, attacked on the playground, and harassed in the classroom. When these young activists entered college in the Sixties, they helped start or joined social movements that supported these Old Left values learned during their childhoods. These radical youth were instrumental in starting some of the major protest organizations of the decade, most notably Students for a Democratic Society, the Free Speech Movement, and later the Weathermen. Their activism during the Sixties helps demonstrate continuity between the Old Left and the New Left, and demonstrates that activists from Old Left backgrounds were both at least responsible for the creation and destruction of the New Left. In addition to their participation in the New Left, radicals were involved at all levels of the Civil Rights Movement in the North and the South. These second-generation activists were often well educated about socioeconomic racism, grew up with African American friends and neighbors, and expected the federal government's reluctance to help the civil rights workers. As a result of their childhood experiences, these young activists were significantly different from other white non-leftist volunteers and their experiences help expand historians' understand of white activism during the Civil Rights Movement.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (ProQuest, viewed on Feb. 28, 2012)

Advisors/Committee Members: Fermaglich, Kirsten, Waltzer, Kenneth, Fine, Lisa, Dagbovie, Pero, Schultz, Debra, Michels, Tony.

Subjects/Keywords: Civil rights movements – History; Communist Party; New Left – History; Old left – History; Red Diaper Babies (RDBs); Social movements – History; White activism; Young activists; Civil rights movements; New Left; Social movements

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCurties, E. (2011). Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:446

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCurties, Elise. “Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left.” 2011. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:446.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCurties, Elise. “Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left.” 2011. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McCurties E. Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:446.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McCurties E. Red roots, radical fruit : children of the Old Left in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2011. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:446

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.

Degree: 2014, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. History - Doctor of Philosophy 2014.

The dissertation examines the role of Polish Catholic domestic workers employed in middle-class Jewish households during the interwar period and the ways that the relationships that developed in the domestic realm influenced decisions to seek or provide aid during the Holocaust. It argues that the relationships that sometimes formed in the domestic realm caused Polish Catholic domestic workers to see their Jewish employers as belonging to their own community of obligation and to sometimes then aid them during the Nazi persecution. In addition, this work examines how middle-class Polish culture was transmitted to Jewish children by their acculturated parents, sometimes via the family's Polish Catholic maid and the ways this maid also familiarized her charges with Polish Catholic peasant culture. This dissertation asserts that this familiarity with Polish culture and the hybrid identities the children of these households sometimes formed was useful in later allowing them to pass as Catholic Poles on the so-called Aryan side if the opportunity was present during the Nazi Occupation period. The dissertation is comprised of two parts. The first examines the prewar period to explore how Polish Catholic women from the countryside made their niches within urban Jewish households, how Polish middle class culture was transmitted to children in acculturated Jewish homes, and to examine how these children then further developed their hybridic Polish Jewish identities while in the public realm, away from the control of their parents and caregivers. The second part of the dissertation examines the initial responses of the domestic workers and their Jewish employers to the Nazi invasion of Poland and the ghettoization of the Jewish population, how it was decided to place Jewish children and families into hiding outside the ghetto, and case studies of children hidden with their former Polish caregivers.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed Sept. 18, 2014)

Advisors/Committee Members: Hanshew, Karrin M, Stauter-Halsted, Keely, Waltzer, Kenneth, Ray, Marcie, Smith, Aminda.

Subjects/Keywords: Women household employees – Poland – History – 20th century; Nannies – Poland – History – 20th century; Catholic women – Poland – History – 20th century; Middle class Jews – Poland – History – 20th century; Jewish children – Poland – History – 20th century; Jewish children – Poland – Ethnic identity; Rural-urban migration – Poland – History – 20th century; Peasants – Poland – History – 20th century; Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) – Poland; World War, 1939-1945 – Jews – Rescue; Jewish children in the Holocaust – Poland; Women household employees; Social aspects; Rural-urban migration; Peasants; Nannies; Middle class Jews; Jewish children in the Holocaust; Jewish children; Catholic women; European history; East European studies; Holocaust studies

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marlow, J. L. (2014). Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. “Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.” 2014. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. “Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.” 2014. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Marlow JL. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Marlow JL. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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