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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Troia, Gary A"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. Shen, Mei. Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Special Education 2015.

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) experience significant difficulties with writing due to their deficits in language, phonological processing, and working memory. This study used a multiprobe multiple baseline single-case experimental design to investigate the efficacy of planning and revising strategy instruction on the compare-contrast expository writing performance of fourth to sixth graders with SLI. Strategy instruction in planning also was compared with a sequenced intervention package of planning and revising. Maintenance probes were administered four weeks after the writing instruction ceased. Potential generalization of the intervention effects to writing essays of another uninstructed but related expository text structure, explanation, as well as the impact of strategy instruction on writing self-efficacy were examined. The results showed that all three students with SLI spent time on advanced planning and generated quality written plans after receiving the planning instruction. The students also wrote longer compare-contrast essays, included more text structure elements, and demonstrated better overall writing quality. After receiving the added revising instruction, all the students demonstrated increases in writing accuracy but decreases in planning time, quality of written plans, length, and text structure elements. The added revising instruction didn’t substantially contribute to overall essay quality, either. The gains from the writing instruction were maintained for at least four weeks. The positive gains from the planning and the revising instruction were also found to generalize to writing explanation essays. Two of the students showed enhanced writing self-efficacy after receiving the planning and revising instruction, whereas the third student showed a decline in self-efficacy, possibly indicating that the writing instruction helped this student develop a more realistic perceived competence for writing performance.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on May 18, 2017)

Advisors/Committee Members: Troia, Gary A, Englert, Carol Sue, Mariage, Troy V, Plavnick, Joshua.

Subjects/Keywords: Specific language impairment in children; Exposition (Rhetoric) – Study and teaching; Special education; Instructional design

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shen, M. (2015). Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3736

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shen, Mei. “Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3736.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shen, Mei. “Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts.” 2015. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Shen M. Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3736.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shen M. Teaching children with specific language impairment to plan and revise compare-contrast texts. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3736

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Enayati, Hassan Allen. Essays on the economics of special education.

Degree: 2014, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Economics 2014.

This dissertation is separated into three independent chapters. The first chapter examines the effect of federal regulations at reducing racial disproportionality in special education identification. Since the 1960s, educators and policymakers have been concerned with the overrepresentation of Black students in special education compared to their White counterparts. In 2004, Congress reauthorized the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and included in it financial incentives for school districts to reduce their level of racial disproportionality in special education programs. This chapter presents evidence of the effect of the penalties on the Black-White gap in special education representation in Michigan. Using a difference-in-differences approach, I exploit the variation by race in the marginal cost of an additional special education student for districts close to the policy threshold. The results indicate that the IDEA policy change induced sanctioned districts to lower their relative disproportionality measure by 41 percent, which was achieved by reducing the proportion of all Black students receiving special education services. The second chapter further investigates disparities in special education placement across multiple dimensions. Factors leading to the placement of students into special education programs have become a central discussion point in special education policy over the past decade. This essay examines the roles that race and socio-economic status play on special education identification. Using data describing Michigan school districts between 2002 and 2010, this chapter analyzes several features of special education: placement, amount of services provided, and type of disabilities identified. I find evidence that socio-economic status and relative race influence participation rates.The third and final chapter explores the role of reduced class size on special education placement. In the 1980s, Tennessee implemented the Project STAR experiment, which randomly assigned elementary-school students to different sized classrooms from kindergarten through third grade. Using this randomization of students to classrooms, I estimate that reduced class size net of its effect on test scores increased special education participation by 2.8 percentage points. Evidence of increased special education identification supports the hypothesis that smaller class sizes lead to increased teacher understanding of students' needs for services.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on May 15, 2017)

Advisors/Committee Members: Elder, Todd E, Haider, Steven J, Imberman, Scott A, Troia, Gary A.

Subjects/Keywords: United States. Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004; Special education – Economic aspects – United States; Special education – Government policy; Discrimination in education – Michigan – Prevention; Class size – Tennessee; Economics, Labor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Enayati, H. A. (2014). Essays on the economics of special education. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2959

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Enayati, Hassan Allen. “Essays on the economics of special education.” 2014. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2959.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Enayati, Hassan Allen. “Essays on the economics of special education.” 2014. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Enayati HA. Essays on the economics of special education. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2959.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Enayati HA. Essays on the economics of special education. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2959

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

3. Hawkins, Lisa Kathleen. Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education 2015

This dissertation is composed of an introduction and two journal-length manuscripts. Both manuscripts focus on the same descriptive case study of teacher-student narrative writing conference enactment in two primary-grade settings, which addressed the following research questions: (1) When conducting narrative writing conferences with primary-aged students, what conference genres do the experienced writing teachers in case study classrooms draw upon across the writing process in order to guide conversational interaction so as to perform specific work for specific instructional purposes? and (2) How, in general, does talk in case study classrooms operate within each identified conference genre in order to support conference purpose? The first manuscript is written for researchers. It introduces the concept of a conference genre, and builds a rationale for its use. Furthermore, it defines and characterizes four potential conference genres utilized by study participants when composing narrative text. The second manuscript is written for teachers, literacy specialists, and teacher educators. It emphases the practical implications of conference genre usage and illustrates their ability to support purposeful talk in primary-grade writing classrooms. Abstracts for each manuscript are given below:Manuscript 1: A common practice in today's primary-grade classrooms, teacher-student writing conferences are considered by accomplished writing teachers and process writing advocates to be a vital component of instruction. Moreover, it is suggested that how teachers and students interact while conferring is of critical importance to their utility as an educational tool. Building an understanding of the discourse that ensues during a writing conference, those purposes that such talk serves overall, and the significance of their pedagogical appropriateness, then, is essential. Typical examinations of the discourse structures used by conference participants, on their own, however, are not enough. In doing so researchers risk isolating the function of such talk to how it operates within a particular moment in a writing conference, while ignoring the greater function such talk might play. Instead, this article offers an alternative framework—the conference genre—that more fully accounts for purpose when examining writing conference talk. Four potential conference genres used to structure conference talk toward particular instructional goals during the production of narrative text in two primary-grade case study settings are defined and characterized; each named according to the type of work it immersed students and teachers in (conferencing as verbal rehearsal, conferencing as criterion specific collaboration, conferencing as transcription activity, and conferencing as find-and-fix correction). Implications for research and practice are also discussed.Manuscript 2: When making determinations about how to teach students educators often give…

Advisors/Committee Members: Certo, Janine L., Juzwik, Mary M., Troia, Gary A., Mariage, Troy V..

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher-student relationships; Composition (Language arts) – Study and teaching (Elementary); Education; Language arts; Linguistics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hawkins, L. K. (2015). Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3675

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hawkins, Lisa Kathleen. “Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3675.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hawkins, Lisa Kathleen. “Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms.” 2015. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hawkins LK. Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3675.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hawkins LK. Purposeful talk : conceptualizing narrative writing conference genres and how they shape teacher-student interactions in primary-grade classrooms. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3675

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.