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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Taggart, Cynthia C"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. Moss, Ashley Grace. Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis M.M. Michigan State University. Music Education 2015

PERCEPTIONS OF PRESERVICE MUSIC EDUCATORS CONCERNING THEIR PREPARATION TO TEACH STUDENTS WITH EXCEPTIONALITIESByAshley Grace Moss The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of teaching practices in higher education on the perceptions of students in those programs of their preparation to work with students with exceptionalities. I collected data from undergraduate music education students attending institutions in the Big 10 Conference who were student teaching during the spring semester of the 2014-2015 academic year. I collected data using a researcher-generated questionnaire informed by the survey tools used in the related research. I analyzed the data using descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, t tests, and ANOVA. I calculated reliabilities using Cronbach’s alpha. The results suggest that the majority of respondents felt adequately prepared to teach students with exceptionalities; however, the degree of preparation varied. There were statistically significant differences between respondents who had personal experiences with individuals with exceptionalities and those who did not have personal experiences with individuals with exceptionalities, as well as respondents who participated in coursework pertaining to the education of students with exceptionalities and those who did not participate in such coursework. Trends in differences between teaching area and teaching level preference groups suggest that preparation may vary by specialization; however small sample size may have attenuated statistical significance. The results suggest a need for more interactions between preservice music educators and students with exceptionalities, as well as a sequenced approach to teaching music educators about exceptional learners.

Description based on online resource;

Advisors/Committee Members: Taggart, Cynthia C, Palac, Judy, Taggart, Bruce.

Subjects/Keywords: Music teachers – Training of – United States; Student teachers – United States – Attitudes; Music – Instruction and study – United States; Special education – United States; Children with disabilities – Education – United States; Music education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moss, A. G. (2015). Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2896

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moss, Ashley Grace. “Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed December 09, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2896.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moss, Ashley Grace. “Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities.” 2015. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Moss AG. Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2896.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moss AG. Perceptions of preservice music educators concerning their preparation to teach students with exceptionalities. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2896

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Hill, Stuart Chapman. "Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville.

Degree: 2016, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Music Education 2016

With the intent of informing the practice of music educators who teach songwriting in K–12 and college/university classrooms, the purpose of this research is to examine how professional songwriters in Nashville, Tennessee—one of songwriting’s professional “hubs”—teach and learn from one another in the process of engaging in collaborative songwriting. This study viewed songwriting as a form of “situated learning” (Lave & Wenger, 1991) and “situated practice” (Folkestad, 2012) whose investigation requires consideration of the professional culture that surrounds creative activity in a specific context (i.e., Nashville). The following research questions guided this study: (1) How do collaborative songwriters describe the process of being inducted to, and learning within, the practice of professional songwriting in Nashville, (2) What teaching and learning behaviors can be identified in the collaborative songwriting processes of Nashville songwriters, and (3) Who are the important actors in the process of learning to be a collaborative songwriter in Nashville, and what roles do they play (e.g., gatekeeper, mentor, role model)? This study combined elements of case study and ethnography. Data sources included observation of co-writing sessions, interviews with songwriters, and participation in and observation of open mic and writers’ nights. I transcribed co-writing sessions and interviews and coded all data for emergent themes. Trustworthiness procedures included triangulation through multiple data sources, “member checking” of transcripts by participants, and review of coded documents by two colleagues in the music education research community. Songwriters located their learning in classrooms and workshops, in the co-writing room, in individual learning pursuits, and in the broader context of the Nashville songwriting community. Songwriters’ learning combined both formal and informal modes. Some of their informal practices aligned with those described in previous research on popular musicians’ learning, though the “listening and copying” identified by Green (2002) did not “translate” directly, given that “copying” is not as valued when generating original material is the goal. Co-writer selection was an important factor in songwriters’ learning. The learning that occurred in co-writing spaces seemed to reflect Green’s (2002) concepts of both “peer-directed learning” and “group learning,” but also a form of “peer coaching” through “checks and balances” that seemed distinct from the learning modes that Green described. Pressure was an important factor for some participants: on one hand, the company of co-writers reduces pressure surrounding creative activity; on the other, accountability to one’s collaborators increases the pressure to be engaged and thoughtful in the co-writing process. Songwriters also valued a safe and open co-writing environment that supported both creativity and learning. Participants identified several “important actors” in their…

Advisors/Committee Members: Snow, Sandra, Robinson, Mitchell, Taggart, Cynthia C, Largey, Michael.

Subjects/Keywords: Composition (Music) – Instruction and study – Social aspects; Artistic collaboration – Tennessee – Nashville – Case studies; Team learning approach in education; Composers – Tennessee – Nashville – Interviews; Popular music – Writing and publishing – Tennessee – Nashville; Music; Secondary education

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hill, S. C. (2016). "Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:4442

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Stuart Chapman. “"Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville.” 2016. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed December 09, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:4442.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Stuart Chapman. “"Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville.” 2016. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hill SC. "Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:4442.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hill SC. "Until that song is born" : an ethnographic investigation of teaching and learning among collaborative songwriters in Nashville. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:4442

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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