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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Pivarnik, James M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. Deere, Samantha J. University fitness center participation and college student academic success.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Kinesiology 2015.

University recreational sports departments are charged with promoting physical activity (PA) to college students. However, funding is necessary for the upkeep of equipment, quality programming, and continued promotion of PA through recreational sports. Although PA is important to university administrators, it is likely secondary to student academic success. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to identify relationships between recreational sports participation and college student academic success. Study participants included all first time degree seeking freshmen students who graduated from high school in Spring, 2010, were in their first semester at the university in the Fall 2010, not student athletes, and had no prior college class experience. Academic variables were compared between recreational sports members (students who purchased at least one fitness center membership) and nonmembers (students who did not purchase a membership). Differences among levels (determined via identification card swipes) of recreational sports use were also compared (never used, low, medium, high). Means±SD and percentages were calculated for all variables of interest. Differences between members and nonmembers in cumulative GPA (cGPA) and cumulative credits completed (CCC) after four consecutive semesters were assessed via analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Odds ratios (OR) and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated via logistic regression for reaching one-year retention, two-year retention, and sophomore status according to recreational sports member status (ref=nonmember). Differences among recreational sports use groups in four-year cGPA were calculated via ANCOVA. OR and aOR ratios with 95% CI were calculated via logistic regression for reaching one-year retention, two-year retention, and five-year graduation according to recreational sports use level (ref=never used). A repeated measures analysis was utilized to assess a possible interaction between year in school and yearly recreational sports use on yearly GPA. After adjusting for covariates, members earned higher cGPA (3.17±0.48) and completed more credits (57.6±7.1) than nonmembers (3.01±0.55 and 55.7±9.0 respectively). Members were also more likely to enroll in a second (aOR=1.42, 95%CI: 1.10-1.85) and third (aOR=1.39, 95%CI: 1.10-1.75) year and achieve sophomore status (aOR=1.59, 95%CI: 1.14-2.22) within two consecutive semesters than nonmembers. Medium (3.26±0.41) and high users (3.27±0.45) of recreational sports earned higher four-year cGPAs than low users (3.20±0.42) and never used (3.08±0.47). Medium/high users were more likely to reach one-year retention than never used (aOR=1.94, 95%CI: 1.11-3.38). No differences were found among recreational sports use levels in two-year retention or five-year Bachelor’s degree attainment. Yearly recreational sports use positively related to yearly GPA, but the relationship did not differ by year in school. Results of this…

Advisors/Committee Members: Pivarnik, James M, Renn, Kristen, Mudd, Lanay, McNeil, Richard.

Subjects/Keywords: Physical fitness centers; College students – Health and hygiene; Academic achievement; Recreation; Education; Kinesiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Deere, S. J. (2015). University fitness center participation and college student academic success. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Deere, Samantha J. “University fitness center participation and college student academic success.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Deere, Samantha J. “University fitness center participation and college student academic success.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Deere SJ. University fitness center participation and college student academic success. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Deere SJ. University fitness center participation and college student academic success. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Stannard, Alicja B. The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach.

Degree: 2016, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Kinesiology 2016

Adequate physical activity (PA) and proper nutrition during pregnancy are important factors contributing to the health of the mother and the fetus. Despite the well-established benefits of PA and proper nutrition during pregnancy, many women do not meet the recommendations, particularly in low-income populations. Discrepancies between the recommended and actual behaviors occur due to various factors, which can be classified into Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental variables, constructed according to the Ecological Model. The overall purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors impacting PA and dietary behaviors in low-income pregnant women based on the Ecological Model framework. Specifically, this study assessed the Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental factors that may impact levels of household PA (HPA), Job PA (JPA), Leisure-Time PA (LTPA), and diet quality (DQ). A convenience sample of low-income pregnant and postpartum was recruited nationwide using the Research Match online system. Enrolled participants completed a questionnaire comprised of five parts: 1) demographics, 2) correlates of PA, 3) correlates of DQ, 4) the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 5) a fruit and vegetable intake survey (FV). The questionnaire was self-administered and conducted online using the Qualtrics online platform. Descriptive statistics were preformed for all demographic data of the participants, all correlates of PA and diet, all PA data and FV score. Data was categorized for all correlated and all outcome variables (HPA, JPA, LTPA, and DQ). For each outcome variable, three correlation matrices were created (one for each of the Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental factors). Based on established criteria, significant variables were selected to be included in the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). A CFA model for each Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental latent factor was created and model fit was evaluated. Four structural equation models (SEM) models were created and evaluated for predicting HPA, JPA, LTPA, and DQ from the three latent factors. A convenience sample of 158 women completed the survey with 109 providing complete data for analysis. Of these, median HPA was 28 MET-hrs/wk, median JPA 0.2 MET-hrs/wk, median LTPA 6.0 MET-hrs/wk and median FV intake 1.75 cups/day. While 43% met LTPA guidelines, only 12% met FV guidelines. No significant associations among latent Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental factors for HPA, JPA, LTPA, and DQ behaviors were found. It is possible that the latent variables were not well specified by the correlates considered. However, this analysis was the first attempt to examine the Ecological model when using such latent factors in a pregnant population. Our findings suggest the Ecological Model as analyzed in this dissertation might not capture the essence and the complexity of PA and DQ behaviors in the most accurate way. Future studies, examining larger…

Advisors/Committee Members: Mudd, Lanay M, Pivarnik, James M, Weatherspoon, Lorraine, Kerver, Jean.

Subjects/Keywords: Pregnant women – Economic conditions; Exercise for pregnant women; Pregnancy – Nutritional aspects; Kinesiology; Nutrition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stannard, A. B. (2016). The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3866

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stannard, Alicja B. “The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach.” 2016. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3866.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stannard, Alicja B. “The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach.” 2016. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stannard AB. The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3866.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stannard AB. The correlates of physical activity and diet quality in low-income pregnant women : the ecological model approach. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3866

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

3. Connolly, Christopher P. Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy.

Degree: 2014, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Kinesiology 2014.

Psychosocial factors, which may facilitate or impede pregnancy leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) have been identified by pregnant women. Although the influence of each factor is unclear, some may be vital in enabling pregnant women to participate in sufficient levels of LTPA. The Risk Perception Attitude Framework (RPA) suggests risk perceptions and efficacy beliefs interact to predict self-protective behavior. Therefore, the first purpose of this dissertation was to examine the joint influence of pregnancy risk perceptions and LTPA efficacy beliefs on LTPA behavior among pregnant women. An additional factor which may impact LTPA behavior, but which has not been examined thoroughly, is religion. Thus, the second purpose of this dissertation was to examine the influence of religion (specifically the Latter-day Saint (LDS) faith) on pregnancy LTPA and potential psychosocial factors which influence pregnancy LTPA.A convenience sample of pregnant women (n=302) was recruited via prenatal clinics and word-of-mouth from mid-Michigan as well as Salt Lake City, Utah. Data were collected from a 15-minute survey (via iPad or paper copy) completed by all study participants. RPA defined attitudinal groups were created via a median split of both pregnancy risk perceptions (high/low) and LTPA efficacy beliefs (high/low) for both moderate and vigorous LTPA. Moderate LTPA was dichotomized as meeting current LTPA guidelines [moderate LTPA ≥150 min/week] or not, while vigorous LTPA was dichotomized as performing any [vigorous LTPA >0 min/week], or not. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were utilized to examine group differences for both moderate and vigorous LTPA. Hierarchical logistic regression was utilized to examine further the joint influence of pregnancy risk perceptions and LTPA efficacy beliefs on pregnancy LTPA. Four religious groups were defined as LDS, and non-LDS high, moderate, and low religiosity (as determined via tertiles). Group differences for LTPA as well as pregnancy risk, LTPA efficacy, physical activity social support, and discussions with prenatal healthcare providers were determined via chi-square analyses and logistic regression.Responsive and proactive pregnant women (those with high efficacy beliefs) were most likely to meet moderate LTPA guidelines and participate in any vigorous LTPA compared to the other attitudinal groups. Hierarchical logistic regression did not reveal an interactive effect of pregnancy risk perceptions and LTPA efficacy beliefs for meeting moderate LTPA guidelines or any vigorous LTPA participation. LDS women were less likely to meet moderate LTPA guidelines, but more likely to participate in vigorous LTPA compared to non-LDS women. LDS women reported higher levels of moderate and vigorous LTPA efficacy. The results suggest that high LTPA efficacy beliefs are important in facilitating greater levels of pregnancy LTPA. Our findings partially extend the scope of the RPA, specifically to classifying pregnant…

Advisors/Committee Members: Pivarnik, James M., Mudd, Lanay M, Feltz, Deborah L, Lapinski, Maria K.

Subjects/Keywords: Exercise for women – Physiological aspects; Exercise for women – Social aspects; Exercise for women – Religious aspects – Mormon Church; Pregnancy; Kinesiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Connolly, C. P. (2014). Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2900

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Connolly, Christopher P. “Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy.” 2014. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2900.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Connolly, Christopher P. “Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy.” 2014. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Connolly CP. Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2900.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Connolly CP. Leisure-time physical activity perceptions, influences, and behavior during pregnancy. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2900

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.