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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Kramer, Daniel"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. Kelley, Zurijanne J. Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis M.S. Michigan State University. Fisheries and Wildlife 2015

Harvesting antlerless white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is one way of managing deer populations to achieve societal goals for the species. Cooperatives bring stakeholders together to meet common conservation goals, and have been a means to achieve desired harvests. The Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative (KQDC) of Pennsylvania, USA, is an on-going cooperative initiated in 2000 to demonstrate how hunting can be used to meet stakeholder’s ecosystem goals. My study used interviews and questionnaires to examine governance factors contributing to the success and sustainability of the KQDC to reduce deer densities. KQDC stakeholders, such as landowners, managers, biologists, local businesses and hunters, reported characteristics such as effective communication, trust, and propensity to accomplish diverse objectives relative to deer and ecosystems as shared resources. To assess motivations and perceived constraints to deer hunting, as well as satisfaction derived from past hunting experience and future willingness to voluntarily hunt in areas with low deer densities such as the KQDC, I surveyed 1,008 hunters who purchased supplemental antlerless deer permits from 2007-2012. A variety of motivations and constraints to hunting of antlerless deer exist on the KQDC. My findings suggest long-term success and sustainability of cooperatives depends in part on 1) consistent recruitment of stakeholders on leadership team 2) hunters’ knowledge of, ability and willingness to participate in conservation objectives through outreach opportunities; and 3) stakeholder willingness to cooperate with diverse members and use of management tools available to them.

Description based on online resource;

Advisors/Committee Members: Riley, Shawn J., Campa III, Henry, Kramer, Daniel.

Subjects/Keywords: White-tailed deer hunting – Pennsylvania; Deer hunters – Pennsylvania; Deer populations – Pennsylvania; Natural resources – Co-management – Pennsylvania; Wildlife management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kelley, Z. J. (2015). Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kelley, Zurijanne J. “Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed July 17, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kelley, Zurijanne J. “Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania.” 2015. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Kelley ZJ. Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 17]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kelley ZJ. Collaborative governance as a precursor to sustained participation in antlerless deer hunting on the Kinzua Quality Deer Cooperative, Pennsylvania. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Jordan, Christopher A. The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Fisheries and Wildlife - Doctor of Philosophy 2015.

Many of the most biodiverse locations on earth consist of landscapes inhabited by human societies with subsistence economies that depend on the harvest of the same resources researchers want to protect and study. In such contexts, especially when the rights to resource use are protected by law, it is essential for researchers, conservationists and practitioners to carefully consider and engage local peoples to ensure the success and efficiency of their work and to help protect the wellbeing of all stakeholders. My study site, the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua, is very similar to this. I designed my initial research to explore: 1) methods to justly and effectively involve local and indigenous people in ecological research, and 2) the importance of local and indigenous people to such research. I then followed this up by integrating the results into broader research looking at trends in traditional environmental knowledge loss/retention and neotropical mammal occupancy in the context of rapid land-use change and globalization. There is an extensive literature on traditional environmental knowledge and neotropical mammals. Yet there is a dearth of publications on these topics on the context of Caribbean Coast, Nicaragua. Additionally, few research efforts have looked explicitly at the interface between the two broad topics. This dissertation builds on the literature by: 1) providing case studies concerning both traditional environmental knowledge and neotropical mammals from a region that is under-represented in academic publications, and 2) describes research that explicitly considers the process of involving local peoples into ecological research. In Chapter 1, I test a social science method for understanding traditional environmental knowledge and discuss how the results can be integrated into ecological research. In Chapter 2, I worked with locals to apply their knowledge of Baird's tapirs to a large monitoring program in a way that permitted me to compare the efficiency of multiple Baird's tapir sampling techniques, including some that integrated traditional knowledge and one that did not. In Chapters 3 and 4 I report on broader research looking at general trends in traditional environmental knowledge loss/retention and neotropical mammal occupancy over time. I found that mental model interviews are a fairly easy, but effective means for ecologists to understand how local peoples consider the ecosystems they live in, to learn how to communicate with locals about their environment, and to learn how to best integrate locals into Western science fieldwork. In addition, I found that local environmental knowledge can affect the efficiency of ecological sampling, which underscores the importance of understanding the process of local involvement in wildlife research and integrating local knowledge in a systematic way. Research on traditional environmental knowledge and wildlife occupancy reveal a landscape that remains rich in…

Advisors/Committee Members: Urquhart, Gerald R, Kramer, Daniel B, Kalof, Linda E, Roloff, Gary J.

Subjects/Keywords: Biodiversity – Monitoring – Nicaragua; Environmental monitoring – Nicaragua; Environmental protection – Nicaragua; Indigenous peoples – Ecology – Nicaragua; Human-animal relationships – Ecology – Nicaragua; Wildlife conservation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jordan, C. A. (2015). The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jordan, Christopher A. “The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed July 17, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jordan, Christopher A. “The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua.” 2015. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Jordan CA. The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 17]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jordan CA. The dynamics of wildlife and environmental knowledge in a bioculturally diverse coupled natural and human system in the Caribbean region of Nicaragua. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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