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You searched for +publisher:"Michigan State University" +contributor:("Hollenbeck, John R"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Michigan State University

1. Miles, Jonathan E. Trust development and performance in self-managed teams.

Degree: 2016, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Business Administration 2016

Research on teams has overwhelmingly presented trust (based on perceptions of the team’s ability, integrity, and benevolence) as a positive and required antecedent of team effectiveness, proposing that trust linkages make it possible for team members to better communicate and coordinate their efforts. This positive conceptualization of trust holds even for groups that have just formed and begun working together, as such groups develop trust in one another (based mainly on institutional, dispositional, and cognitive proxies for ability, integrity, and benevolence) rapidly in order to complete their goals together, referred to in the literature as swift trust. This dissertation proposes that high levels of trust early in team tenure can cause teams to lag behind in performance when compared to teams who build trust more slowly. In addition, this dissertation examines the reciprocal relationship between trust and performance over time, as performance episodes provide information on ability, integrity, and benevolence to the team. By observing and surveying a set of 96 teams working on a multiple-step project over the course of 15 weeks, I was able to determine that demographic similarity and trust propensity predict trust early in team tenure, and that teams with high levels of this early trust produced lower overall performance than did teams who built trust more slowly. I also found that the variance in contribution toward performance within the team negatively predicts subsequent trust in the team, and that trust predicts subsequent effectiveness of team processes. On the other hand, team performance does not predict subsequent trust in the team, indicating that team members may not use performance information as an indicator of the ability, integrity, and benevolence of their team. While high trust early in team tenure was detrimental to performance, trust late in team tenure allowed teams to better translate their past performance into high subsequent performance. I discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings and propose future research directions in the study of a more complex relationship between trust and performance in teams over time.

Description based on online resource;

Advisors/Committee Members: Hollenbeck, John R., Conlon, Donald E., Schaubroeck, John M., Scott, Brent A..

Subjects/Keywords: Self-directed work teams; Trust; Organizational behavior; Management; Occupational psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miles, J. E. (2016). Trust development and performance in self-managed teams. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miles, Jonathan E. “Trust development and performance in self-managed teams.” 2016. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miles, Jonathan E. “Trust development and performance in self-managed teams.” 2016. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Miles JE. Trust development and performance in self-managed teams. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Miles JE. Trust development and performance in self-managed teams. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Matta, Fadel Khalil. The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt.

Degree: 2016, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Business Administration 2016

Although most prior LMX research has focused solely on the influence of LMX relationships on employees and supervisors within the leader-member dyad, it is important to consider how this dyadic phenomenon influences the broader network of dyadic coworker thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. In this dissertation, I draw on social comparison theory to suggest that LMX relationships have important implications for not only how employees view themselves and their leaders but also how they view, feel toward, and ultimately behave with their coworkers. This dissertation posits that, regardless of whether a particular employee has a relatively high LMX relationship or a relatively low LMX relationship with their supervisor, LMX social comparisons can produce beneficial and detrimental effects for dyadic coworker interactions depending upon whether an employee experiences self-other overlap with that referent coworker. To test my social comparison theory arguments, my dissertation utilizes dyadic social network data from three large coworker workgroups to demonstrate how these LMX social comparison processes influence the social comparison emotions that employees feel toward their referent coworkers and how these social comparison emotions influence interpersonal discretionary behaviors amongst coworkers. Interestingly, the results of my dissertation provide novel examples in which relatively lower LMX quality (under certain conditions) had beneficial workplace outcomes (in terms of inspiration and OCBI), challenging the implicit assumption in the literature that higher LMX quality always results in superior outcomes.

Description based on online resource;

Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, Brent A, Conlon, Donald E, Hollenbeck, John R, Johnson, Russell E, Van Dyne, Linn.

Subjects/Keywords: Leadership; Dyadic analysis (Social sciences); Social comparison; Work environment – Psychological aspects; Organizational behavior; Management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matta, F. K. (2016). The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3915

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matta, Fadel Khalil. “The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt.” 2016. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed February 17, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3915.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matta, Fadel Khalil. “The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt.” 2016. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Matta FK. The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3915.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Matta FK. The gift and the curse of LMX social comparisons : when they help and when they hurt. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3915

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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