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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Takim, Liyakat"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Mendes, Jan-Therese A. Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation.

Degree: MA, 2011, McMaster University

From what specific socio-cultural “positionality” are African-Canadian Muslim females living their realities? What methods do they employ to locate, (re)claim, and/or assert selfhood from these peripheral spaces within the white nation? How does their shared socio-religio-racial and gendered marginality, potentially, act as a site for inciting a sense of camaraderie towards one another? Such queries frame the content of this thesis which commissions qualitative research methods to unearth answers that rely upon the “particular” – by intimately gazing at 13 Black Muslim women’s gendered-racialized experiences in Toronto. Dividing analysis by religious status this work examines the dynamics distinct to 1. convert and 2.“life-long” Muslim participants’ cultivation of a religious/racial identity. The anti-Black and anti-Islamic discrimination punctuating “multicultural” Canada later collapses investigation into a unified survey of the ways African-Canadian Muslim women in general, contend with the oppressive socio-cultural forces attempting to infringe on their humanity. Research concludes that the adverse or hospitable responses of surrounding communities (these are: the ethnic-majority Muslim community; the non-Muslim Black population; Eurocentric secular society at large) to these women, influences how they both place themselves in their environments and interact with their Black-Muslim female fellows. This thesis argues that the persistent ostrasization of African-Canadian Islamic women within the religious and secular-public spheres of society establishes a necessary, defensive solidarity amongst these individuals; specifically, their communions can erect a nurturing platform to challenge or minimize the impact of oppressive forces – particularly protecting against the mental and social violence inflicted by racist-sexist Islamophobic white supremacist powers.

Master of Arts (MA)

Advisors/Committee Members: Rothenberg, Celia, Takim, Liyakat, Sinding, Christina, Religious Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: African-Canadian; Muslim; Convert; Women; Toronto; Discrimination; Race, Ethnicity and post-Colonial Studies; Race, Ethnicity and post-Colonial Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mendes, J. A. (2011). Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/11289

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mendes, Jan-Therese A. “Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation.” 2011. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/11289.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mendes, Jan-Therese A. “Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation.” 2011. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Mendes JA. Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2011. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/11289.

Council of Science Editors:

Mendes JA. Exploring Blackness from Muslim, Female, Canadian Realities: Founding Selfhood, (Re)claiming Identity and Negotiating Belongingness Within/Against a Hostile Nation. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/11289

2. Tabrizi, Taymaz. MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW.

Degree: PhD, 2017, McMaster University

A study of Imāmī Islamic law, gender and soteriology; marriage and divorce as technologies of the self.

This dissertation explores marriage in Muslim Imāmī juristic law as an embodiment of a set of practices that are aimed at cultivating the pious and virtuous self. As a ritual practice for mainstream Imāmī jurists, marriage (and its corollary activities, e.g. sex) was a mode of pietistic self-fashioning and hence a technology of the self. When faced with the strong possibility or inevitability of marital breakdown, and the sexual sins that may have come about as a result of this breakdown, Imāmī jurists opted for creating a space for women’s prerogative to divorce in which the marriage could end whilst still upholding Islam as a program for the circumvention of sin and the production of īmān. Divorce, in this sense, can be thought of as a safety mechanism and extension of marriage’s program for the nurturing of a pietistic psychology in men and women. The textual and gendered discourse of juristic law was therefore aimed at creating a legal program for individuals so as to maintain the normative Muslim’s ontological bond with God through a series of regulations, disciplines, bodily practices and juristically permitted gendered power inversions that promoted soteriological success. This study argues that the primary concern of Imāmī jurists was not to maintain a gendered hierarchy as the current dominant scholarship holds, but to prevent sin, especially zinā, the corruption of the qalb (metaphysical heart) and ultimately avoid damnation in the Hereafter. For Imāmī jurists, marriage was not just a procedural practice of rights and duties, but a mode of self-development and a platform through which an eschatological battle against sexual sin and the Devil took place in. When patriarchy, or more specifically, asymmetrical power relations between (actual/potential) wives and husbands (or guardians) conflicted with the soteriological aims of juristic discourse, the former was inverted. The study concludes that maintaining gender hierarchy was not integral to the cosmology of juristic practice (even in its premodern discourse); it was maintaining the normative believer’s ontological bond with God and saving him/her, as well as the believing community, from damnation. Theological concerns for salvation - and the cultivation of the pious self that made salvation possible – is what animated Imāmī juristic discourse and not patriarchy whether it was obtained from the source-texts (Qur’an, ḥadīth) or social custom (ʿurf). This study undertakes this task by observing six key areas in the Imāmī tradition where notions of salvation and spiritual ontology in marriage/divorce figure the most prominently: juristic preliminaries on marriage and zinā, interfaith marriage, prepubescent marriage, temporary marriage with zānīyahs, nushūz and khulʿ divorce.

Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Takim, Liyakat, Rothenberg, Celia, Fadel, Mohammad, Religious Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: islamic law; marriage; gender; shia law; Imāmī law; theology; salvation; zina; nushuz; nushūz; wife-beating; divorce; Twelver Shīʿism

…Ph.D. Thesis – T. Tabrizi; McMaster University – Religious Studies. 4.4: CONCLUSION… …Ḥasan, however, refused to go Ph.D. Thesis – T. Tabrizi; McMaster University – Religious… …d. 2 Ph.D. Thesis – T. Tabrizi; McMaster University – Religious Studies. 726/1325)… …T. Tabrizi; McMaster University – Religious Studies. Imāmīs hold that there is no greater… …2012), 31. 4 Ph.D. Thesis – T. Tabrizi; McMaster University – Religious Studies. the… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tabrizi, T. (2017). MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21070

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tabrizi, Taymaz. “MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21070.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tabrizi, Taymaz. “MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW.” 2017. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Tabrizi T. MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21070.

Council of Science Editors:

Tabrizi T. MARRIAGE AS A TECHNOLOGY OF THE SELF: SEX, GENDER AND JURISTIC INVERSION IN THE SOTERIOLOGY OF IMĀMĪ LAW. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21070

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