Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Reiter, Harold"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


McMaster University

1. Humphreys, Cathy. Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI.

Degree: MSc, 2016, McMaster University

Purpose: Academic programs are faced with the important task of selecting health professional students who not only possess necessary cognitive abilities to perform their future job, but also have valuable personal/professional characteristics to draw upon in the provision of quality patient care. There is therefore "widespread agreement that it is desirable to broaden the scope of assessment beyond academic achievement" (Eva, Reiter, Trinh, Wasi, Rosenfeld, Norman, 2009, p.768) in candidate selection. The Child Life Studies Program at McMaster University used a 4-station multiple mini-interview (MMI) as part of the admission selection process. This study sought to determine the feasibility, degree of acceptability and reliability of this 4-station MMI design, and if there were any predictors of candidate's performance on the MMI. Methods: A group of 35 applicants in 2014, and 40 applicants in 2015 screened through admission procedures participated in a 4-station MMI. Each station was 15 minutes in length with 5 minutes for scoring each candidate. Anonymous stakeholder surveys were used in 2015 to assess participant and interviewer's perceptions and acceptability of the MMI in applicant selection. Generalizability coefficients were calculated to determine reliability. In addition, candidate's experience in healthcare, professional work experience, experience with children with disabilities, and previous child life course work (or lack thereof) were analyzed through independent t-tests to report any relationship with candidate's performance on the MMI. A one-way ANOVA was also completed to report any relationship between candidate's undergraduate degree type and his/her MMI performance. Results: The 4-station MMI was found to be feasible for a small program with a marked increase found in the number of candidates interviewed in a shorter period of time. It was also found to be highly acceptable among candidates and faculty. However, this studies' findings did not show statistically significant differences in MMI performance based on identified predictors, or undergraduate degree type. The reliability of the 4-station design in 2014 was G=0.718, however, was only G=0.089 in 2015, far lower than expected based on the prior year’s G Coefficient. The potential pitfalls in running a small program MMI are discussed with specific suggestions and modifications provided to enhance reliability of candidate selections across professions.

Thesis

Master of Science (MSc)

Advisors/Committee Members: Reiter, Harold, Health Science Education.

Subjects/Keywords: MMI; multiple-mini interviews; candidate selection; admission selection

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Humphreys, C. (2016). Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/19057

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Humphreys, Cathy. “Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI.” 2016. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/19057.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Humphreys, Cathy. “Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI.” 2016. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Humphreys C. Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/19057.

Council of Science Editors:

Humphreys C. Successes and Pitfalls in Running a Small Program MMI. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/19057


McMaster University

2. Kazemi, Ghazaleh. What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?.

Degree: MSc, 2018, McMaster University

Patient education is an important component of quality cancer care. However, there remains much debate about its effects, merits and limitations. The primary objective of this thesis was to identify outcomes of importance for patient education interventions in breast cancer. Through the process of this inquiry, a systematic review of all patient education assessment instruments, a literature review of patient education studies in chronic diseases and cancer, and ultimately a qualitative study using interpretive description was conducted. The systematic review of assessment instruments revealed a lack of psychometrically sound instruments developed to assess quality and efficacy of patient education materials. There was also a lack of consensus as to what aspects of materials should be appraised to constitute good quality. The review of patient education intervention studies in both chronic diseases and cancer identified a general lack of consensus on the intended effects of educational interventions. Multiple outcomes were used without consistency and in differing combinations in the literature making it difficult to compare relative efficacy of interventions. To discover what key stakeholders in the process of patient education in breast cancer (patients, physicians and nurses) would identify as outcomes of importance, a generic qualitative study using interpretive description was conducted. Five common themes to all groups with respect to outcomes of importance were discovered: improving knowledge, improving coping ability, providing an orientation to the cancer system, enabling shared decision making and impacting behaviour during cancer treatment. Despite the surprising variability and inconsistency of outcomes discovered in the patient education literature, this qualitative study demonstrated that patients, physicians and nurses generally agree on what constitute important outcomes and serves as a first step in the process of developing validated outcomes for patient education interventions in cancer.

Thesis

Master of Science (MSc)

This thesis explores what are considered important outcomes of patient education in breast cancer. Firstly, a systematic review of all instruments created to judge patient education materials was completed and showed a lack of valid instruments for use in judging quality or outcomes in patient education. Secondly, a review of patient education studies in chronic conditions and cancer revealed a paucity of consistent or recommended outcomes for patient education. Lastly, the major focus of this thesis was a qualitative study that used focus groups to discover what breast cancer patients, physicians and nurses identify as important outcomes of patient education interventions at the Juravinski Cancer Centre. It identified that patients, physicians and nurse have five common beliefs about important outcomes of education interventions: improving knowledge, improving coping ability, providing an orientation to the cancer system, enabling shared decision making and helping to direct…

Advisors/Committee Members: Reiter, Harold, Levine, Mark, Sinding, Christina, Health Science Education.

Subjects/Keywords: Patient education; Breast Cancer; Outcomes of patient education; Patient education assessment instruments

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kazemi, G. (2018). What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23719

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kazemi, Ghazaleh. “What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?.” 2018. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23719.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kazemi, Ghazaleh. “What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Kazemi G. What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23719.

Council of Science Editors:

Kazemi G. What are the outcomes of importance for patient education in breast cancer?. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23719

.