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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Pierrynowski, Michael"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Gallant, Jodi L. BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS.

Degree: MSc, 2013, McMaster University

Introduction: Barefoot running is growing in popularity as runners seek strategies to avoid running-related injuries (RRIs). A new theoretical perspective suggests that the improved cutaneous sensation during barefoot running results in a less injurious running style characterized by increased cadence, landing on the forefoot and more knee flexion. The mechanisms by which the barefoot running style may have an effect on RRIs are not well understood. Purpose: Explore the new theoretical perspective on RRIs that supports the barefoot running style and investigate the effects of modified cutaneous sensation on the adaptation to and retention of the barefoot running style. Methods: First, a scoping review was performed to identify implicit theory underlying both traditional shod and barefoot running research and practice. Second, a feasibility study investigated altered cutaneous sensation as a proposed mechanism by which a person learns and retains the skill of barefoot running. Sixteen participants ran shod on a treadmill then were randomized to receive one of four cutaneous sensation treatments. They then ran barefoot for the first time and 48 hours later. Changes in the cadences, foot angles and knee angles means and variations across runs and treatment groups were used to quantify learning and retention. Results: The scoping review provided evidence that improved plantar cutaneous sensation, such as when one runs barefoot, could reduce the risk of RRIs. In the feasibility study, our findings suggest that barefoot compared to shod running increased plantar cutaneous sensory thresholds, and increased mean cadence and mean foot angle. Improved retention of the barefoot running style was shown in the treatment group with anaesthetic cream on their legs. Conclusions: Plantar cutaneous sensation is proposed as an important factor when exploring the etiology of RRIs. This knowledge may influence an individual’s risk of experiencing a running-related injury.

Master of Science Rehabilitation Science (MSc)

Advisors/Committee Members: Pierrynowski, Michael, Rehabilitation Science.

Subjects/Keywords: running; injury; barefoot; cutaneous sensation; learning; Rehabilitation and Therapy; Rehabilitation and Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gallant, J. L. (2013). BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13416

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gallant, Jodi L. “BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS.” 2013. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13416.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gallant, Jodi L. “BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS.” 2013. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Gallant JL. BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13416.

Council of Science Editors:

Gallant JL. BAREFOOT RUNNING: THE ROLE OF SENSORY FEEDBACK AND ITS THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13416


McMaster University

2. Cashaback, Joshua G. Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee.

Degree: PhD, 2013, McMaster University

Increased muscle stiffness helps prevent excessive movement that can lead to ligament and soft-tissue damage. There is empirical evidence suggesting that muscles are important in preventing injuries caused by excessive translational movements. Very little is known, however, on how our muscles provide translational stiffness. This thesis uses complementary theoretical (Chapters 2 and 3) and experimental (Chapter 4) techniques to address how muscles provide translational joint stiffness. In Chapters 2 and 3, we used an elastic energy approach to successfully derive equations that quantify muscular contributions to joint stiffness. From the equations, we were able to determine how the geometric orientation and mechanical properties of an individual muscle allows it to provide translational stiffness. In Chapter 4, using the techniques developed in the previous chapters, we test the notion that the nervous system is responsive to translational loading. From these works, several important discoveries were found. We are the first to find that muscles with large squared projections (alignment) over a degree-of-freedom are well suited to provide translational stiffness. Further, by explicitly describing the interactions between the translational and rotational stiffnesses we found that ignoring these interactions resulted in an overestimation of principal stiffnesses. This has large implication for stability analyses, where such overestimations could suggest that an unsafe task is actually safe. Experimentally, we found that the nervous system is responsive to translational loading. This was accomplished through increased activity of muscle well suited to provide translational stiffness. Collectively, the works presented provide much needed knowledge on the role muscle play in stabilizing and protecting our joints. This thesis provides a strong foundation for continued joint stiffness, stability, and impedance research.

Doctor of Science (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Pierrynowski, Michael, Kinesiology.

Subjects/Keywords: stiffness; impedance; muscle; tendon; translation; Biomechanical Engineering; Biomechanical Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cashaback, J. G. (2013). Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13712

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cashaback, Joshua G. “Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13712.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cashaback, Joshua G. “Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee.” 2013. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cashaback JG. Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13712.

Council of Science Editors:

Cashaback JG. Six Degree-of-Freedom, Musculotendon Joint Stiffness: Examples with the Knee. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13712

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