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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Peachey, Gladys"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Jones, Barbara L. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.

Degree: MSc, 2012, McMaster University

Abstract Health care practice environments are central to the safety and quality of patient care. Hospitals often develop and implement a professional practice model (PPM) to improve practice environments. In the United States, magnet hospital designation is a driving force in PPM implementation. In Ontario, Canada, despite the lack of magnet hospital designation, many hospitals have implemented PPMs. There appear to be differences in how PPMs are implemented in Ontario. This phenomenographic study examined professional practice experts’ conceptions of PPM implementation and use in Ontario acute care hospitals. The findings indicate that PPM implementation is a dynamic and emergent phenomenon that occurs in cyclical phases of growth and reduced activity. Seven categories of PPM use are described (a) creating alignment/consistency, (b) supporting evidence-based practice, (c) enabling interprofessional practice, (d) enhancing professional accountability, (e) enabling patient-centred care, (f) creating/ strengthening linkages, and (g) strategic positioning of professional practice. Categories exhibited hierarchical relationships, with more foundational uses providing support for higher level uses. Three structural themes are identified (a) model design/structure, (b) professional practice leadership, and (c) organizational support. These themes work individually and synergistically, within and across the categories to influence use and potential impact of the PPM. Progressively fuller and more complex use of the PPM appears to occur under increasingly intense influence of the structural themes. The analysis provides unique information about relationships within and among categories of PPM use. This provides insight regarding how organizations might maximize return on investment with PPM implementation. Seven recommendations are identified.

Master of Science (MSc)

Advisors/Committee Members: McKey, Colleen, Peachey, Gladys, Tompkins, Catherine, Nursing.

Subjects/Keywords: professional practice models; professional practice leaders; phenomenography; practice model utilization; Health and Medical Administration; Health and Medical Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, B. L. (2012). USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Barbara L. “USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.” 2012. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Barbara L. “USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.” 2012. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Jones BL. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones BL. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284


McMaster University

2. Lobo, Vanessa. NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES.

Degree: PhD, 2015, McMaster University

Background: Nursing overtime is being integrated into the normal landscape of practice to ensure optimal staffing levels and address variations in patient volume and acuity. This is particularly true in critical care where fluctuations in either are difficult to predict. Research exploring nurses’ perceptions of the outcomes of overtime has not been conducted, and studies exploring the relationship between nursing overtime and patient outcomes have produced conflicting results. Objectives: This study aims to explore critical care nurses’ perceptions of the outcomes of overtime, their reasons for working or not working it, and to determine the relationship between critical care nursing overtime and specific nurse (sick time) and patient (infections/mortality) outcomes. Methods: This thesis is comprised of two discrete components. Thorne’s interpretive description guided the qualitative component and multilevel regression models tested relationships in the quantitative portion. Qualitative and quantitative methods were selected because of their complementarity and ability to explore both perceptions of overtime in addition to the relationship between nursing overtime and outcomes for nursing staff and their patients. Results: Participants’ reasons for working overtime included: (a) financial gain, (b) helping and being with colleagues, (c) continuity for nurses and patients, and (d) accelerated career development. Their reasons for not working overtime were: (a) tired and tired of being there, (b) established plans, and (c) not enough notice. Major themes highlighting the perceived outcomes of overtime included: (a) physical effects, (b) impact on patient centered care, (c) the issue of respect, (d) balancing family and work, (e) the issue of guilt, (f) financial gain, and (g) safety is jeopardized. Regression analysis revealed that for every 10 hours of nursing overtime, sick time increased by 3.3 hours (p<0.0001). Overtime was not associated with patient outcomes (infections and mortality). Conclusion: There are negative and positive consequences of nursing overtime for nurses and patients. Future research needs to focus on the collection of accurate patient level data, as well as tracking and exploring the effects of unpaid overtime (missed breaks/staying late). Nurses should work to proactively lobby governments to fund adequate staffing in order to reduce the need for overtime and provide safer patient care.

Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

This study explores critical care nurses’ perceptions of the outcomes of working overtime, their reasons for working or not working overtime, and the relationship between nursing overtime and specific nurse and patient outcomes. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used involving 28 nurses on 11 units in three tertiary care academic health science centers. The four original contributions to nursing knowledge are: (a) physical effects overtime has on nurses, (b) feelings of disrespect overtime engenders, (c) loss of patient-centered care that results…

Advisors/Committee Members: Ploeg, Jenny, Fisher, Anita, Akhtar-Danesh, Noori, Peachey, Gladys, Nursing.

Subjects/Keywords: overtime; nurse; critical care; qualitative; quantitative; patient outcomes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lobo, V. (2015). NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18344

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lobo, Vanessa. “NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18344.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lobo, Vanessa. “NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES.” 2015. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lobo V. NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18344.

Council of Science Editors:

Lobo V. NURSING OVERTIME WORK IN CRITICAL CARE: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PERSPECTIVES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18344

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