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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("McKey, Colleen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Cziraki, Karen. Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role.

Degree: MSc, 2012, McMaster University

ABSTRACT In healthcare organizations, the first–line nurse manager role is pivotal. The role links management and employees, and has a direct impact on organizational performance, including quality of care, financial stability, and patient satisfaction (Gallo, 2007). The first-line nurse manager interfaces with a variety of professions including physicians, and is expected to be clinically proficient, and to demonstrate non-nursing knowledge in areas such as labour relations, information technology, financial and business management (Gould, Kelly & Maidwell, 2001). When retirement projections are applied to the first-line nurse manager population, Canada will face a serious nursing management shortage this decade (CNA, 2009). In light of the paucity of research studies pertaining to this subject, an exploratory descriptive qualitative research study was conducted in a large regional health care organization in Central South Ontario to determine the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in this role. The findings revealed a discrepancy between the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role, underscored the importance of the mentor role, and confirmed the challenges encountered by first-line nurse managers practicing in the current healthcare environment. Several recommendations are presented at the individual, program, organization and policy levels to inform Registered Nurses who are interested in pursuing a career in nursing management, and to assist healthcare leaders to create environments that attract and support Registered Nurses in this important role.

Master of Science (MSc)

Advisors/Committee Members: McKey, Colleen, Nursing.

Subjects/Keywords: first-line nurse manager; attract; retain; Nursing Administration; Nursing Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cziraki, K. (2012). Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12335

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cziraki, Karen. “Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role.” 2012. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12335.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cziraki, Karen. “Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role.” 2012. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Cziraki K. Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12335.

Council of Science Editors:

Cziraki K. Factors that Attract and Retain Registered Nurses in the First-Line Nurse Manager Role. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12335


McMaster University

2. Jones, Barbara L. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.

Degree: MSc, 2012, McMaster University

Abstract Health care practice environments are central to the safety and quality of patient care. Hospitals often develop and implement a professional practice model (PPM) to improve practice environments. In the United States, magnet hospital designation is a driving force in PPM implementation. In Ontario, Canada, despite the lack of magnet hospital designation, many hospitals have implemented PPMs. There appear to be differences in how PPMs are implemented in Ontario. This phenomenographic study examined professional practice experts’ conceptions of PPM implementation and use in Ontario acute care hospitals. The findings indicate that PPM implementation is a dynamic and emergent phenomenon that occurs in cyclical phases of growth and reduced activity. Seven categories of PPM use are described (a) creating alignment/consistency, (b) supporting evidence-based practice, (c) enabling interprofessional practice, (d) enhancing professional accountability, (e) enabling patient-centred care, (f) creating/ strengthening linkages, and (g) strategic positioning of professional practice. Categories exhibited hierarchical relationships, with more foundational uses providing support for higher level uses. Three structural themes are identified (a) model design/structure, (b) professional practice leadership, and (c) organizational support. These themes work individually and synergistically, within and across the categories to influence use and potential impact of the PPM. Progressively fuller and more complex use of the PPM appears to occur under increasingly intense influence of the structural themes. The analysis provides unique information about relationships within and among categories of PPM use. This provides insight regarding how organizations might maximize return on investment with PPM implementation. Seven recommendations are identified.

Master of Science (MSc)

Advisors/Committee Members: McKey, Colleen, Peachey, Gladys, Tompkins, Catherine, Nursing.

Subjects/Keywords: professional practice models; professional practice leaders; phenomenography; practice model utilization; Health and Medical Administration; Health and Medical Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, B. L. (2012). USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Barbara L. “USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.” 2012. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Barbara L. “USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS.” 2012. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Jones BL. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones BL. USING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODELS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE EXPERTS' CONCEPTIONS. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12284


McMaster University

3. Beduz, Mary Agnes. The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions.

Degree: PhD, 2012, McMaster University

Background: Hospitalization is stressful, and anxiety is a common experience among hospital inpatients. Nurses who use a standardized patient anxiety assessment tool can improve their recognition of patient anxiety and its management. Implementing evidence-informed practice changes among nurses is a challenge, and there is little compelling evidence on how best to proceed with such implementations. Two theoretical frameworks that have shown promise for designing effective interventions among nurses are the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), which focuses on individual determinants of behaviour, and Promoting Action on Research in Health Services (PARiHS), which focuses on the nature of the evidence, the context in which change is to take place, and the type of facilitation used to induce change. The current study attempts to fill a gap in our understanding of the relationship between the context of practice and nurses’ intention to adopt evidence-informed practices. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adding context among those variables derived from the TPB enhances prediction of nurses’ behavioural intentions to adopt an evidence-informed practice change. Methods: Following an educational intervention aimed at teaching nurses the use of a tool for assessing patient anxiety, 174 participants (70% of those attending the educational classes) completed a survey measuring (1) attitude, ( 2) subjective norm, (3) perceived behavioural control, (4) context, and (5) intention to perform anxiety assessments. Results: Intention to perform anxiety assessments on patients was greater for nurses who (a) perceived that they had control over performing anxiety assessments, (b) had a positive attitude toward providing such assessments, and (c) perceived their work context to be positive. Conclusion: This study adds to our understanding of the variables influencing nurses’ adoption of evidence-informed practices. Context, defined in terms of leadership, culture, and evaluation, appears to influence individual adoption of evidence-based practices. These results suggest that the success of attempts to encourage health professionals to adopt evidence-based practices will be enhanced when contextual variables important to the success of the change intervention are put into place. Future research can build on the current study by seeking to replicate the findings reported here and expanding the list of contextual variables investigated.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Dobbins, Maureen, Hackett, Rick, McKey, Colleen, Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing).

Subjects/Keywords: Context; Behvioural Intention; Knowledge Translation; Implementation; Nursing; Knowledge Translation; Knowledge Translation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beduz, M. A. (2012). The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12072

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beduz, Mary Agnes. “The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12072.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beduz, Mary Agnes. “The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions.” 2012. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Beduz MA. The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12072.

Council of Science Editors:

Beduz MA. The Role of Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Percieved Behavioural Control and Context in Nurses's Behavioural Intentions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12072

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