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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Martin-Hill, Dawn"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Manitowabi, Joshua. IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US.

Degree: MA, 2017, McMaster University

This thesis looks at ways of Anishinaabe cultural resurgence for Indigenous youth through our current education systems.

Three Anishinaabe elders who had experience in Anishinaabe on-reserve schools and in community Indigenous education programs were interviewed to learn their views on what had worked and not worked in past attempts to integrate Anishinaabe language and cultural knowledge into curriculum and programming. Their views on curriculum content, pedagogical methods, and education policy were solicited to gain a better understanding of how to decolonize the current Eurocentric school system and provide more successful learning experiences for Anishinaabe children and youth. The key findings were: 1) language and spiritual education must be at the core of the curriculum; 2) elders’ knowledge and their oral stories and oral history had to be the key means of transferring knowledge to the younger generation; 3) land-based, hands-on experiential learning experiences that utilized the knowledge and skills of community members were essential to successfully engaging students in the learning process; 4) teachers needed to take responsibility for identifying and nurturing the learning spirit in each child; and 5) commitment from the government for adequate funding, support resources and class time was essential for the successful integration of Anishinaabe language and cultural knowledge into on-reserve school systems.

Thesis

Master of Arts (MA)

This thesis examines the insights of three Anishinaabe elders (knowledge holders) who had extensive experience in Anishinaabe on-reserve schools or in community Indigenous education programs. They were interviewed to learn their views on what had and had not worked in past attempts to integrate Anishinaabe language and cultural knowledge into on-reserve schools and programming. Their insights inform recommendations for five strategies to improve the engagement of Anishinaabe students through culture-based teachings.

Advisors/Committee Members: Martin-Hill, Dawn, Anthropology.

Subjects/Keywords: Anishinaabe; Oral Stories; Decolonization; Elders

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Manitowabi, J. (2017). IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/22292

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manitowabi, Joshua. “IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US.” 2017. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/22292.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manitowabi, Joshua. “IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US.” 2017. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Manitowabi J. IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/22292.

Council of Science Editors:

Manitowabi J. IT SOMETIMES SPEAKS TO US. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/22292


McMaster University

2. Downey, Bernice. Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts.

Degree: PhD, 2014, McMaster University

Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and hospitalization for adult Indigenous peoples. Historical, socio-economic, environmental and cultural risk factors have been identified in the literature and new evidence is emerging regarding culturally relevant health promotion approaches for Indigenous peoples at risk of developing or currently experiencing cardiovascular disease. Self-management of care is considered a central component to effective cardiovascular disease management. This approach requires a working knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular disease medications, and an ability to effectively communicate with healthcare practitioners. Another important associated risk factor for Indigenous peoples with heart disease, is the gap between patient - practitioner understanding of heart disease. The biomedical perspective supported by Western scientific evidence, makes little room for Indigenous knowledge. Indigenous peoples may wish to include Indigenous knowledge and/or Traditional Medicine in their self-care approach. The findings of this research demonstrates that Indigenous peoples primarily have a biomedical understanding of their heart disease and most are unaware of how various socio-historical and socio-cultural factors such as the negative inter-generational impact of residential school and contemporary experiences of oppression and discrimination are linked to their heart disease. This situation can be attributed to an Indigenous knowledge diaspora experience that includes the severance of access to Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous languages during the residential school period and the dominance of biomedicine in health care delivery. The concept of ‘diaspora health literacy’ is critically discussed as a potential tool to address the Indigenous knowledge diaspora barrier. It is proposed that Indigenous peoples with heart disease can enhance their self-care when culturally relevant health literacy approaches are available to them. In turn, healthcare practitioners can broker an ‘Indigenous therapeutic relational space’ with their Indigenous patients by initiating a culturally relevant health literacy assessment and a harmonized implementation model.

Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Martin Hill, Dawn, Anthropology.

Subjects/Keywords: Diaspora; Health Literacy; Indigenous

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Downey, B. (2014). Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16449

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Downey, Bernice. “Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16449.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Downey, Bernice. “Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts.” 2014. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Downey B. Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16449.

Council of Science Editors:

Downey B. Diaspora Health Literacy: reclaiming and restoring Nibwaakaawin (wisdom) and mending broken hearts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16449

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