Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Howlader, Matiar M. R."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


McMaster University

1. Redhwan, Md Taufique Zaman. Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection.

Degree: MASc, 2018, McMaster University

Lead (Pb) levels in tap water below the established water safety guideline are now considered harmful, thus detecting sub-parts-per-billion level Pb is important. This thesis reports on a miniaturized Copper (Cu)−based electrochemical sensor fabricated from thick film electrodes for their superior sensing performance. These thick film electrodes are based on highly conductive rolled-annealed Cu foil that has a compact bulk structure, but these advantages are often offset by the fact that RA Cu foil is difficult to bond to a substrate due to poor film-adhesion property and lack of mechanical interlocks. For this reason, we develop a direct bonding process for Cu/polymer. An integrated three-electrode planar configuration is then fabricated on the bonded specimen to achieve a fully-functional sensor that can detect 0.2 μg/L (0.2 ppb) Pb2+ ions from a 100 μL sample in only 30 s. This is the most rapid detection of Pb featured to date by an all Cu-based sensor. This thesis first focuses on improving substrate adhesion of RA Cu foil to liquid crystal polymer (LCP). This is achieved by a surface activated bonding process where Cu and LCP surfaces are treated with low-power reactive ion etching oxygen plasma followed by low-pressure contact at 230 °C. This treatment produces hydroxyl (OH−) groups on Cu and LCP surfaces making them highly hydrophilic. When Cu and LCP are contacted and heated, the OH− chains condense by dehydration and form an intermediate oxide layer. This layer mainly develops as Cu2O nanoparticles from the plasma-treated Cu side due to thermal oxidation in air. These nanoparticles diffuse into the polymer substrate when heated under mechanical pressure, resulting in a strongly bonded flexible specimen for the sensor. A simple, inexpensive, and production-friendly fabrication process is then developed for these sensors. Following direct bonding, flexible Cu/LCP is fed into a LaserJet printer for a one-step transfer of polyester resin−based electrode mask on Cu. This is followed by etching, packaging, and a chlorinating process to achieve a fully-functional integrated sensor. The sensing performance of directly bonded Cu/LCP is comparable to that of commercially available Cu/polyimide (PI) laminate. Our approach holds promise towards realizing low-cost integrated water quality monitoring systems.

Thesis

Master of Applied Science (MASc)

Lead contamination in tap water has major health risks for which monitoring of its levels is important. In this thesis, we develop a low-cost copper/polymer-based lead sensor. The sensor is fabricated from high-quality metal foil electrodes that are integrated to a polymer substrate by a direct bonding process. This enables strong adhesion of foil-based electrodes to the substrate that is crucial to the sensor performance and packaging integrity. We investigate the bonding mechanism between copper and polymer to understand the fundamentals of materials integration. These findings will lead to the development of polymer-based sensors and integrated systems. The…

Advisors/Committee Members: Haddara, Yaser M., Howlader, Matiar M. R., Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: surface activated bonding; lead detection; electrochemical sensor; fully integrated; water quality monitoring; copper; polymer; environmental sensor

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Redhwan, M. T. Z. (2018). Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/24163

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Redhwan, Md Taufique Zaman. “Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection.” 2018. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/24163.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Redhwan, Md Taufique Zaman. “Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection.” 2018. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Redhwan MTZ. Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/24163.

Council of Science Editors:

Redhwan MTZ. Fully Integrated Electrochemical Sensor Based on Surface Activated Copper/Polymer Bonding for Lead Detection. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/24163


McMaster University

2. Qin, Yiheng. Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems.

Degree: PhD, 2017, McMaster University

The monitoring of pH and free chlorine concentration in drinking water is important for water safety and public health. However, existing laboratory-based analytical methods are laborious, inefficient, and costly. This thesis focuses on the development of an easy-to-use, sensitive, and low-cost drinking water quality monitoring system for pH and free chlorine. An inkjet printing technology with a two-step thermolysis process in air is developed to deposit palladium/palladium oxide (Pd/PdO) films as potentiometric pH sensing electrodes. The redox reaction between PdO and hydronium ions generates the sensor output voltage. A large PdO percentage in the film provides a high sensitivity of ~60 mV/pH. A defect-free Pd/PdO film with small roughness contributes to a fast response and a high stability. When the Pd ink is thermalized in low vacuum, the deposited Pd/PdO film shows a bilayer structure. The residual oxygen in the low vacuum environment assists the decomposition of organic ligands for Pd to form a thin and continuous layer beneath submicron Pd aggregates. The oxidized bilayer film behaves as a temperature sensor with a sensitivity of 0.19% resistance change per °C, which can be used to compensate the sensed pH signals. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is drawn by hand to form a free chlorine sensor. Free chlorine oxidises PEDOT:PSS, whose resistivity increment indicates the free chlorine concentration in the range of 0.5-500 ppm. Also, we simplified an amperometric free chlorine sensor based on amine-modified pencil leads. The simplified sensor is calibration-free, potentiostat-free, and easy-to-use. The pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors are fabricated on a common substrate and connected to a field-programmable gate array board for data processing and display. The sensing system is user-friendly, cheap, and can accurately monitor real water samples.

Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Sensitive, easy-to-use, and low-cost pH and free chlorine monitoring systems are important for drinking water safety and public health. In this thesis, we develop an inkjet printing technology to deposit palladium/palladium oxide films for potentiometric pH sensors and resistive temperature sensors. The different electrical and electrochemical properties of the palladium/palladium oxide films are realized by creating different film morphologies using different ink thermolysis atmospheres. The developed pH and temperature sensors are highly sensitive, fast in response, and stable. For free chlorine sensors, a hand drawing process is used to deposit poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), which is an indicator for the free chlorine concentration over a wide range. We also developed a calibration-free free chlorine sensors based on modified pencil leads. Such a free chlorine sensor is integrated with the pH and temperature sensors, and an electronic readout system for accurate on-site drinking water quality monitoring at low cost is…

Advisors/Committee Members: Howlader, Matiar M. R., Deen, M. Jamal, Haddara, Yaser M., Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: Inkjet printing; Sensor; Water quality monitoring; pH sensor; Free chlorine sensor; Temperature sensor

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Qin, Y. (2017). Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21465

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Qin, Yiheng. “Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21465.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Qin, Yiheng. “Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Qin Y. Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21465.

Council of Science Editors:

Qin Y. Microfabricated pH, temperature, and free chlorine sensors for integrated drinking water quality monitoring systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/21465

.