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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Grenier, Amanda"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Ludlow, Bryn A. Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study.

Degree: MA, 2012, McMaster University

All images in this document may not be produced without the expressed written consent of the author.

The innovative research method of “body mapping” was used in this study with geriatric inpatients receiving daily hæmodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. Five people took part in this study; three participants completed all study phases. They created three body maps each and took part in one follow up, semi-structured interview to share their experiences of body mapping. Two themes were drawn from the data: (1) body mapping gives patients a voice to communicate their experiences in the dialysis unit; and (2) body mapping makes visible participants’ illness adjustment patterns, and levels of connection, or disconnection in the dialysis unit. Based on the ways body mapping benefitted participants in this study, it is reasonable to suggest that this visual communication tool could be useful in other research settings, and as a clinical tool to support patients’ attention to their bodies and their interactions with healthcare providers.

Master of Arts (MA)

Advisors/Committee Members: Sinding, Christina, Grenier, Amanda, Gillett, James, Health and Aging.

Subjects/Keywords: Body mapping; haemodialysis; hemodialysis; nephrology; health communication; geriatric medicine; Art Practice; Body Regions; Health Communication; Knowledge Translation; Medical Anatomy; Medical Physiology; Movement and Mind-Body Therapies; Nephrology; Other Medical Specialties; Other Mental and Social Health; Preventative Medicine; Somatic Bodywork and Related Therapeutic Practices; Therapeutics; Art Practice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ludlow, B. A. (2012). Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12677

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ludlow, Bryn A. “Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study.” 2012. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12677.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ludlow, Bryn A. “Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study.” 2012. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ludlow BA. Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12677.

Council of Science Editors:

Ludlow BA. Body mapping with geriatric inpatients receiving daily haemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute: A qualitative study. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12677


McMaster University

2. Mahoney, Julie. Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments.

Degree: MA, 2013, McMaster University

The increased recognition of chronic disease (CD) has been accompanied by an era of medical technology, intended to better treat and manage CDs such as type 1 diabetes. Since the discovery of insulin in 1921, the treatment and management of type 1 diabetes has significantly improved, and witnessed innovations such as the insulin pump. Yet, as the population ages within a technological society, the implications of advancements in diabetes care and its relationship with older adults is of great concern. How do older adults identify and make use of these new technologies? How do technological advances challenge traditional life course models or expected transitions of growing old? How do older adults continue to cope and manage with a CD in their advanced years? The objective of this study was to explore how older adults with type 1 diabetes relate to management devices used in their daily routines. Five open-ended and semi-structured interviews were conducted with older adults living with type 1 diabetes (recruited through the Canadian Diabetes Association [CDA] and the Hamilton Health Sciences [HHS] Diabetes Care and Research Program [DCRP], Hamilton, Ontario). Interviews were transcribed and analyzed drawing on analytic techniques of grounded theory. Open, axial and selective coding was used in accordance to the constant comparative approach. Themes included living longer with type 1 diabetes, how type 1 diabetes challenges traditional models of aging and the lifecourse perspective, and older adults welcoming the use of technology. Overall findings suggested technology used for the daily treatment and management of type 1 diabetes may permit increases in one’s quality of life (QOL), yet challenge policies and practices within healthcare settings to ensure older adults maintain independent self-management strategies. Keywords: aging, chronic disease, technology, treatment, type 1 diabetes, older adult, diabetes community

Master of Arts (MA)

Advisors/Committee Members: Grenier, Amanda, Gillett, James, Sherifali, Diana, Health and Aging.

Subjects/Keywords: aging; chronic disease; technology; type 1 diabetes; older adult; Other Social and Behavioral Sciences; Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mahoney, J. (2013). Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13330

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mahoney, Julie. “Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments.” 2013. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13330.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mahoney, Julie. “Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments.” 2013. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Mahoney J. Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13330.

Council of Science Editors:

Mahoney J. Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adulthood: Relationships with Technological Treatments. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13330

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