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You searched for +publisher:"McMaster University" +contributor:("Birch, Stephen"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Bisnauth, Melanie A. EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA.

Degree: MSc, 2015, McMaster University

Study Objective The objectives of this study are: (1) to explore the impact of the national consolidated guidelines for Option B+ PMTCT on the work of healthcare professionals at both clinical and management levels (including nurses, physicians and management) (2) to understand pregnant HIV-positive women views and experiences with ART for life, as a way to better manage the Option B+ PMTCT programme within state hospitals Research Questions The following research questions will be used to explore both perceptions of healthcare professionals and patients: 1.How have the national consolidated guidelines for Option B+ PMTCT affected the work of healthcare professionals? 2.What are pregnant HIV-positive women’s views and experiences about going on lifetime treatment with ARVs?

ABSTRACT Background. South Africa’s National Department of Health has adopted World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2013 consolidated guidelines on the use of ARVs for treatment and prevention of HIV infection. The guidelines include changes for prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) through Option B+. Option B+ aims to reduce the HIV prevalence rate amongst these women by placing them on ART for life, no matter their CD4 count. As a result, in January 2015, these guidelines were implemented for the PMTCT programme at RMMCH. Little is known about the impact of these new guidelines on the work of healthcare professionals in state hospitals. Most importantly, no research has focused on how these changes have affected adherence for the patients. Purpose. The purpose of this research project is (1) to explore the impact of the Option B+ PMTCT programme on the work of healthcare professionals, and (2) to understand pregnant HIV-positive women views and experiences with ART for life, as a way to better manage the Option B+ PMTCT programme. Methods. A qualitative study design is used with a phenomenological approach. The methodology uses demographic questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals and patients. The study is situated in Johannesburg, South Africa. Findings. The findings demonstrate that work has changed and become difficult to manage for all healthcare professionals because of (1) the need for strengthening indicators for tracking to decrease loss to follow-up (LTFU); (2) inconsistency in delivery of counseling and support services and the need for communication across clinical departments; and (3) the lack of compassion and understanding by service providers. The difficult healthcare environment has affected overall views and experiences of pregnant HIV-positive women going on ART for life. All 55 patient participants responded that they chose to take the fixed-dose combination (FDC) for life to protect the health of the baby and felt ART for life can be stopped after giving birth. Conclusion. Implications for future research include the need to address changes within the healthcare system at both clinical and management levels. It is crucial to incorporate the perspective of…

Advisors/Committee Members: Birch, Stephen, Coovadia, Ashraf, Wilson, Michael G., Mbuagbaw, Lawrence, Global Health.

Subjects/Keywords: Option B+; programme evaluation; PMTCT (pregnant mother to child transmission); (WHO) World Health Organization; HIV/AIDS; South Africa, Johannesburg; Coronationville; policy implementation; Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital; qualitative research; convenience sampling; phenomological approach; adaptability; accessibility; affordability; acceptability; McIntyre Access Framework

…MSc. Thesis – Melanie A. Bisnauth; McMaster University- Global Health. Gynaecology, and… …for your unwavering support. vii MSc. Thesis – Melanie A. Bisnauth; McMaster University… …Thesis – Melanie A. Bisnauth; McMaster University- Global Health. Affordability… …McMaster University- Global Health. APPENDICES Appendix A: Option B+ for PMTCT… …Healthcare Professionals: Gender xi MSc. Thesis – Melanie A. Bisnauth; McMaster University… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bisnauth, M. A. (2015). EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18348

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bisnauth, Melanie A. “EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA.” 2015. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed April 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18348.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bisnauth, Melanie A. “EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA.” 2015. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Bisnauth MA. EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18348.

Council of Science Editors:

Bisnauth MA. EVALUATION OF THE NEW OPTION B+ PREGNANT MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAM FOR HIV INFECTED WOMEN AT HOSPITAL FACILITIES: CASE STUDY AT THE RAHIMA MOOSA MOTHER AND CHILD HOSPITAL, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18348


McMaster University

2. Kothari, Anita. The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies.

Degree: PhD, 2002, McMaster University

Researchers are being encouraged to consider contextual influences on health-related outcomes. To support this perspective, two context-sensitive studies were conducted. The first study explored the utilization of a research report by Ontario public health units, and examined whether utilization differed by involvement in the research process. Research utilization was conceptualized as a three stage process (reading, information processing and application). Using a case study design, results from three "involved" public health units and three "uninvolved" units demonstrated that inclusion in the research process led to a greater understanding of the analysis and increased the value associated with the report. Involvement did not, however, lead to greater research utilization. An associated contextual analysis provided a rich backdrop, highlighting the general challenges of implementing research-based guidelines given front-line workers' current realities. The second study examined the influence of contextual level (e.g., health region level) socioeconomic status on a woman's lifetime mammography screening uptake. A secondary data analysis was conducted using Ontario data from the 1996 National Population Health Survey. Logistic hierarchical multilevel modelling was used to examine the regional variation in mammography uptake, and to examine the role of contextual and individual level variables on regional variation. The estimated average proportion of Ontario women, aged 50-69, who reported ever having had a mammogram was 0.86. Results demonstrated modest variations among health regions in ever having had a mammogram. These variations could not be explained by the variables considered in this study. Individual level variables demonstrated an association with mammography uptake, as did regional level education and regional median family income. Furthermore, each of these latter two contextual variables demonstrated interaction effects with the individual level variable, "social involvement." Thus, contextual variables played a significant role in mammography uptake. Contextual circumstances ought to be considered during the development of breast health promotion programs and policies.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Birch, Stephen, Health Research Methodology.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kothari, A. (2002). The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/7291

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kothari, Anita. “The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies.” 2002. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed April 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/7291.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kothari, Anita. “The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies.” 2002. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Kothari A. The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2002. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/7291.

Council of Science Editors:

Kothari A. The contextual approach in health research: Two empirical studies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2002. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/7291

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