Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"McGill University" +contributor:("Toope, S. J."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


McGill University

1. Ewing, Michelle. Justifying humanitarian intervention.

Degree: Master of Laws, Institute of Comparative Law., 1993, McGill University

The time is ripe for a re-examination of the doctrine of humanitarian intervention, and in particular, of its legal basis in international law. This thesis attempts to draw attention to the significance of the decision to justify humanitarian intervention in a certain way, and to some of the implications of that decision.

The thesis compares the two justificatory options which seem to be most appropriate to the multilateralism of the post-Cold War era: collective humanitarian intervention under Chapter VII of the UN Charter and mulitilateral humanitarian intervention under customary international law. It reviews recent state practice, arguing that a mulitilateral right to intervene for the protection of human rights is emerging at custom.

After critically analysing humanitarian intervention's justification under the Charter, the thesis concludes that the better way to justify the doctrine, both in principle and in practice, is under customary law.

Advisors/Committee Members: Toope, S. J. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: United Nations. Charter.; Human rights; Intervention (International law)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ewing, M. (1993). Justifying humanitarian intervention. (Masters Thesis). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile26196.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ewing, Michelle. “Justifying humanitarian intervention.” 1993. Masters Thesis, McGill University. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile26196.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ewing, Michelle. “Justifying humanitarian intervention.” 1993. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ewing M. Justifying humanitarian intervention. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McGill University; 1993. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile26196.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Ewing M. Justifying humanitarian intervention. [Masters Thesis]. McGill University; 1993. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile26196.pdf


McGill University

2. Majlessi, M. Shervin. Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment.

Degree: Master of Laws, Institute of Comparative Law., 1999, McGill University

The growth in the use of collective and unilateral economic sanctions in the post-Cold-War epoch calls for a re-examination of the legal basis and constraints on the implementation of sanctions. This thesis is an attempt to explore, from a legal point of view, the problems and restrictions associated with sanctions, and suggest ways in which economic sanctions can be rendered more legitimate in terms of international legal requirements.

Unilateral and collective economic sanctions are based on different legal premises: the traditional theory of retaliation and treaty principles respectively. It will be argued that a breach of an erga omnes obligation is also a legitimate legal basis for economic sanctions.

Key cases in which sanctions have been used will be reviewed and it will be contended that, in addition to traditional economic considerations, sanctions should be subject to other limitations such as respect for principles of international humanitarian law. Issues regarding the legitimacy of the Security Council's actions and authority will also be addressed and possible ways of controlling the actions of the Security Council will be put forth.

After determining the restrictions on implementation of sanctions, proposals for refining current practices of imposing economic sanctions are submitted. In conclusion, it is submitted that unilateral sanctions are subject to serious legal constraints and that collective sanctions have the potential of being used in a more humane and institutionally coherent way.

Advisors/Committee Members: Toope, S. J. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sanctions (International law); Economic sanctions.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Majlessi, M. S. (1999). Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment. (Masters Thesis). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile30318.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Majlessi, M Shervin. “Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment.” 1999. Masters Thesis, McGill University. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile30318.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Majlessi, M Shervin. “Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment.” 1999. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Majlessi MS. Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McGill University; 1999. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile30318.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Majlessi MS. Use of economic sanctions under international law : a contemporary assessment. [Masters Thesis]. McGill University; 1999. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile30318.pdf

.