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You searched for +publisher:"McGill University" +contributor:("Schuepp, P. H."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McGill University

1. Kaharabata, Samuel K. Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources.

Degree: PhD, Department of Natural Resource Sciences., 1999, McGill University

Two approaches, one using an atmospheric diffusion model and the other an atmospheric tracer, were used to predict the source strength of trace gases from observations of the downwind concentration field. Both approaches do not disturb the prevailing environmental and physical conditions nor the existing biogenic processes. An analytical solution to the advection-diffusion equation was used to back-calculate the source strength from the downwind concentration measurements of (i) single and multipoint (4 and 16 points) trace gas (sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and methane (CH4)) release experiments conducted over microplots over an open field, and (ii) single point source SF6 release experiments conducted over a forested terrain. Best predictions of the source strength (to within +/-20%) were obtained from concentration observations made along the centreline of the diffusing plumes with the predictions improving when observations at the mean plume height were used. The diffusion model was then used to compute footprint estimates for neutral and unstable conditions, for tower and aircraft based observation platforms above the forest. They showed spatially constrained footprints in the surface layer, due to effective vertical coupling, so that observations from towers and low flying aircraft must be expected to be very site specific, and scaling up to larger areas will have to be done with careful consideration of surface mosaics. Above-canopy sampling of trace gases to determine volatile organic compound emissions were then interpreted in terms of footprint considerations. This was accomplished by defining the upwind canopy areas effectively sampled under the given wind and stability conditions. The analysis demonstrated, for example, that the variability observed in measured isoprene fluxes could be accounted for by varying numbers of randomly distributed clumps of emitter species within a varying footprint. It suggested that heterogeneity of the forest canopy, in ter

Sulphur hexafluoride was also used as an atmospheric tracer in order to estimate CH4 emissions from manure slurry and cattle housed in barns and feedlots. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Advisors/Committee Members: Schuepp, P. H. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Air  – Pollution  – Mathematical models.; Atmospheric diffusion  – Mathematical models.; Atmospheric methane.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kaharabata, S. K. (1999). Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile35903.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaharabata, Samuel K. “Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources.” 1999. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed June 01, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile35903.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaharabata, Samuel K. “Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources.” 1999. Web. 01 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Kaharabata SK. Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1999. [cited 2020 Jun 01]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile35903.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaharabata SK. Non-disturbing methods of estimating trace gas emissions from agricultural and forest sources. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1999. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile35903.pdf


McGill University

2. Pelletier, Robert G. (Robert Gordon). Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer.

Degree: MS, Department of Natural Resource Sciences., 1995, McGill University

This thesis represents the first large-scale, systematic study to use the double trace moment (DTM) technique in order to characterize the universal multifractal nature of aircraft-based measurements of wind velocity and several passive scalar concentrations under a variety of ambient conditions. Power-law scaling behaviour was demonstrated for the examined fields, from the smallest accessible measurement scales up to at least 250 km, right through the "mesoscale gap" postulated by the standard model of atmospheric dynamics. DTM results indicate remarkable stability in the estimates of the multifractality index, alpha, and the codimension of mean singularity, C sb1, for wind velocity measured under different conditions of surface type, time of year, and measurement height within the surface boundary layer. Estimates for rm CO sb2, H sb2O, and O sb3 were largely dominated by the wind velocity statistics as expected, but slightly sensitive to measurement height and moderately sensitive to significant changes in the underlying surface. Results showed that all of the fields examined may be classified as "unconditionally hard" multifractals, which is consistent with previously-published results for ground-based wind velocity measurements. It was demonstrated using probability distribution and multifractal analyses that ensemble statistical moments above approximately second-order can be expected to diverge for all examined fields due to the extremely singular nature of the fields at sub-resolution scales, and that the currently-employed quasi-local aircraft based sampling strategy is capable of reliably characterizing the statistical behaviour of the examined fields up to this physically-imposed limit. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) Advisors/Committee Members: Schuepp, P. H. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Atmospheric turbulence.; Boundary layer (Meteorology); Winds  – Speed  – Measurement.; Multifractals.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pelletier, R. G. (. G. (1995). Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer. (Masters Thesis). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile22788.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pelletier, Robert G (Robert Gordon). “Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer.” 1995. Masters Thesis, McGill University. Accessed June 01, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile22788.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pelletier, Robert G (Robert Gordon). “Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer.” 1995. Web. 01 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Pelletier RG(G. Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McGill University; 1995. [cited 2020 Jun 01]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile22788.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Pelletier RG(G. Multifractal characterization of aircraft-based measurements of turbulence and passive scalar fields within the surface boundary layer. [Masters Thesis]. McGill University; 1995. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile22788.pdf

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