Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Marquette University" +contributor:("Luft, Sebastian, Monahan, Michael, Choi, Yoon"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Peters, Matthew M. Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies.

Degree: 2017, Marquette University

As Hegel notes in his long Introduction to the Lectures on the History of Philosophy, the problem of the multiplicity of conflicting philosophies presents a particularly urgent problem to the very discipline of philosophy itself. For, from the viewpoint of what Hegel would refer to as “ordinary consciousness”, the fact that there are so many different philosophies which seem constantly to disagree can only lead to one conclusion: philosophy itself is a futile enterprise. Hegel, perhaps more than any previous philosopher, was sensitive to this charge of futility levelled against philosophy. In response, he provided an explanatory account of the multiplicity of philosophies. This dissertation seeks to explicate Hegel’s effort in this regard. Hegel’s basic argument is that the multiplicity of philosophies is to be explained as expressions of the dialectical and polymorphic development of the mind. The mind advances through stages, each one of which is capable of expressing itself in some determinate philosophy. Insofar as this is the case, however, philosophy can be shown to be not merely a haphazard succession of conflicting viewpoints but rather the manifestation of the mind in its historical development. The chapters of this dissertation each examine crucial elements to Hegel’s overall theory of the development of the mind. They also demonstrate how Hegel thereby explains the very emergence of, and intelligible correlations among, the various philosophies. Advisors/Committee Members: Luft, Sebastian, Monahan, Michael, Choi, Yoon.

Subjects/Keywords: consciousness; development; disagreement; Hegel; polymorphism; Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Peters, M. M. (2017). Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies. (Thesis). Marquette University. Retrieved from https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/726

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peters, Matthew M. “Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies.” 2017. Thesis, Marquette University. Accessed October 23, 2019. https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/726.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peters, Matthew M. “Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies.” 2017. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Peters MM. Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies. [Internet] [Thesis]. Marquette University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/726.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Peters MM. Hegel and the Problem of the Multiplicity of Conflicting Philosophies. [Thesis]. Marquette University; 2017. Available from: https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/726

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Wolf, William Clark. The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism.

Degree: 2019, Marquette University

In this dissertation, I seek to explain G.W.F. Hegel’s view that human accessible conceptual content can provide knowledge about the nature or essence of things. I call this view “Conceptual Transparency.” It finds its historical antecedent in the views of eighteenth century German rationalists, which were strongly criticized by Immanuel Kant. I argue that Hegel explains Conceptual Transparency in such a way that preserves many implications of German rationalism, but in a form that is largely compatible with Kant’s criticisms of the original rationalist version. After providing background on Hegel’s relationship to the traditional rationalist theory of concepts and Kant’s challenge to it, I claim that Hegel’s central task is to provide a theory of conceptual content that allows a relationship to the objective world without being dependent on the specifically sensory aspect of the world, which Kant’s theory of concepts required. Since many interpreters deny that Hegel’s use of the term “concept” is comparable to other historical philosophers (or our own), I first show that Hegel’s critique of standard conceptions of concepts presupposes an agreement of subject matter. I then show how Hegel’s account of the “formal concept” provides the skeleton for a view of conceptual content that relies on negative relations between terms, rather than a relation to sensibility, to provide content. Hegel’s account of conceptual content is completed when he shows how a universal term is further specified so that it can determine singular objects. This occurs in its adequate form in a teleological process. I argue that Hegel’s account of teleology in the Science of Logic is an attempt to explain how and where Conceptual Transparency obtains. A teleological process is one in which a concept constitutes an object, and this means that a concept is perfectly adequate to express that thing’s nature and not merely to represent it. However, in the final chapter, I show that Hegel’s concept of teleology is meant paradigmatically to illuminate how human purposive processes have constituted a social world that is conceptually accessible to us. In this way, the primary “province” of Hegel’s rationalism is the human constructed world. Advisors/Committee Members: Luft, Sebastian, Monahan, Michael, Choi, Yoon.

Subjects/Keywords: Concepts; German Idealism; G.W.F. Hegel; Immanuel Kant; Metaphilosophy; Metaphysics; Philosophy

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wolf, W. C. (2019). The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism. (Thesis). Marquette University. Retrieved from https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/873

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wolf, William Clark. “The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism.” 2019. Thesis, Marquette University. Accessed October 23, 2019. https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/873.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wolf, William Clark. “The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism.” 2019. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wolf WC. The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism. [Internet] [Thesis]. Marquette University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/873.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wolf WC. The Province of Conceptual Reason: Hegel's Post-Kantian Rationalism. [Thesis]. Marquette University; 2019. Available from: https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations_mu/873

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.