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You searched for +publisher:"Loma Linda University" +contributor:("Winslow, Gerald R."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Loma Linda University

1. Olson, Gregory W. Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates.

Degree: MS, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, 2011, Loma Linda University

Introduction: Dentistry is regarded as a profession and granted certain privileges, such as self-regulation. Associated with this status are stated and implied responsibilities which are widely debated. In recent years, dental professionalism seems to be on the decline. Evidence cited includes access-to-care issues and decreased public trust in dentists. In response, academia and professional organizations have developed curricula and statements intended to bolster professionalism. Meanwhile little is known about practicing dentists’ attitudes or participation in health-related civic matters. Objectives: This study seeks to examine the importance Loma Linda University (LLU) dental graduates place on public roles, their reported participation in public activities and the factors related to their responses. Methods: Four hundred and fifty-six LLU dental graduates were surveyed. Civic-mindedness was ascertained from respondents’ reported attitudes regarding community participation, political involvement and collective advocacy. Civic activity was determined from reported civic participation during the last three years. Additional responses were gathered on a number of health-related issues to assess the respondents’ level of social concern beyond the immediate dental care needs of their patients. Findings from this study were compared with those of a similar study of physicians from the US.1 Results: Overall, three quarters of LLU respondents were considered civic-minded and 91% participated in civic activities. Attitudes regarding civic obligations were very similar to the US physician group. 1 The LLU dental graduates, however, reported a higher level of civic action than did the US physicians1 (91% vs. 65%). Regression analysis for civic-mindedness determined female gender and the specialties of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics were salient factors. Regression analysis for civic activity determined civic-mindedness, pediatric dentistry, and professional age greater than 20 years were related factors. The majority of LLU respondents, unlike US physicians, 1 deemed broader concerns not obviously tied to the health of their patients as important. The implications of these results as well as directions for future research were discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Caruso, Joseph M, Leggitt, V. Leroy, Winslow, Gerald R..

Subjects/Keywords: Civic and Community Engagement; Community-Based Research; Community Health and Preventive Medicine; Dentistry; Medicine and Health; Medicine and Health Sciences; Orthodontics and Orthodontology; Quantitative, Qualitative, Comparative, and Historical Methodologies; Education - Dental - California - Loma Linda; Dentists - California - Loma Linda; Attitude of Health Personnel; Community Health Services; Social Responsibility; Social Participation; Social Values; Professional Self-Regulation; Dental Professionalism; Access-to-Care; Decreased Public Trust; Health-Related Civic Matters

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olson, G. W. (2011). Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/286

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olson, Gregory W. “Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates.” 2011. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed May 31, 2020. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/286.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olson, Gregory W. “Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates.” 2011. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Olson GW. Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2011. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/286.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Olson GW. Civic Attitude and Activity of Loma Linda University Dental Graduates. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/286

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Loma Linda University

2. Kinjo, Takanobu. Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000.

Degree: MA, Religion, 2000, Loma Linda University

The center of the brain-death and organ transplantation debate in Japan has always been whether whole brain-death should be regarded as the death of a person. However, the debate has not yet been settled in Japanese society. There are four main reasons why it is said that whole brain-death criteria are incompatible with Japanese society. First, they cannot establish a person's death because the Japanese define it not according to medical facts but according to social relationships. Second, it is impossible to determine societal consensus in Japan on this issue. Third, traditional Japanese views toward life and death are incompatible with whole brain-death criteria. Fourth, whole brain-death criteria for the purpose of organ-transplantation is incompatible with the Japanese ethics that emphasizes relationships. The more ongoing and more intimate the relationships are between family members and the deceased, the more probable it is that family members will perceive him or her a living person and the less likely it is that they will accept whole brain-death criteria with respect to their beloved one. The essential cause of these problems is the "wall" between the two sides which implies insensitivity and indifference to the needs of those on the other side; What is missing in the controversy is a mutual understanding of these issues on the part of those on both the donor and the recipient sides. Because the Japanese people do not have a special ethics like Christian neighbor-love, one form of moral imagination which helps North Americans see strangers as if they are loved ones, and because the Japanese do not have the custom of giving gifts without reciprocity, it is unrealistic to expect them to donate organs to strangers. The most promising solution would be to abolish the ordinary practice of maintaining anonymity between those on the donor and the recipient sides so that each is finally able to become more realistic about the needs of those on the other side. Advisors/Committee Members: Larson, David R., Carr, Mark, Orr, Robert D., Venden, Louis, Walters, James W., Winslow, Gerald R..

Subjects/Keywords: Bioethics and Medical Ethics; Medicine and Health Sciences; Brain Death; Organ Transplantation - Japan; Ethic, Medical; Family Relations - Japan; Whole Brain Death; Death of Person; Japanese Social Relationship

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinjo, T. (2000). Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinjo, Takanobu. “Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000.” 2000. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed May 31, 2020. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinjo, Takanobu. “Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000.” 2000. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Kinjo T. Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2000. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kinjo T. Brain Death, Organ Transplantation and the Ethics of Relationships in Japan: 1968-2000. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2000. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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