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You searched for +publisher:"Loma Linda University" +contributor:("Leonard Brand"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Loma Linda University

1. Biaggi, Roberto Enrique. Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming.

Degree: MS, Geology, 1989, Loma Linda University

During Eocene time sediment accumulated in Fossil Lake, in what developed to be a small linear and structurally controlled basin. Fossil Lake was one of several lakes into which the Green River Formation was deposited in Wyoming, Utah and Colorado. Detailed stratigraphic analysis of the Lower Unit of the Fossil Butte Member revealed a well developed lacustrine sequence south of Fossil Butte, and indicates four major depositional facies: (1) open lacustrine, (2) marginal lacustrine, (3) carbonate mudflat, and (4) marginal fluvio-deltaic. The open lacustrine facies is characterized by kerogen rich to kerogen poor finely laminated micrites , that consist mainly of calcite and very little dolomite. These carbonates contain well preserved fossil fish, ostracodes, molluscs and the kerogen that was produced mainly by algae. These rocks grade towards the margins into micrites that become more bioturbated closer to the margin of the lake, as well as into ostracodal and gastropodal limestones. Nearshore carbonates consist mostly of calcite and usually are well bioturbated. Typical fossils include molluscs and ostracodes. In some localized areas limestones can become oolitic, contain some typical nearshore plant remains and even some rare beach lag deposits of vertebrate bones. The carbonate mudflat facies is mainly restricted to the eastern margin where sediments were subaerially exposed and conditions favored precipitation of dolomite as indicated by several units with mudcracks. Sudden transgressions of the lake produced higher energy conditions which resulted in carbonate being ripped-up on the mudflat and subsequently deposited over scoured surfaces. Although fluvial events occurred through the life of the lake, towards the end of Lower Unit time fluvial activity increased. A Gilbert-type delta developed from the southwest prograding into the lake and virtually filling the whole lake, culminating Lower Unit time. Deltaic sediments consist of siliciclastic sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Deltaic foresets characterize these sandstones, and fossil reptiles, mammals, fish, molluscs and ostracodes also occur. The lateral and vertical relationship of Lower Unit lithofacies reflect the dynamic nature of Fossil Lake, where the interplay of a combination of factors such as distance from depocenter to margin, changes in depth, oxygenation, siliciclastic and carbonate sediment influx, and productivity resulted in a typical lithofacies succession from basin depocenter to margin: kerogen rich laminated micrites to kerogen poor laminated micrite to micrites and limestones to mudstones, siltstones and sandstones. This relationship also occurs vertically, but sudden variations of diverse factors resulted in cycles of two or more of these lithofacies, as well as abrupt changes in lithofacies deposition. This study has further documented the importance of fluvial influences on the distribution of kerogen and the deposition of facies sequences within ancient lake complexes. It has provided a detailed and unique… Advisors/Committee Members: H. Paul Buchheim, Leonard Brand, Clyde Webster.

Subjects/Keywords: Earth Sciences; Environmental Chemistry; Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic  – Eocene; Paleoecology  – Wyoming; Paleolimnology  – Wyoming.; Geological Sciences program  – Dissertations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Biaggi, R. E. (1989). Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/536

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biaggi, Roberto Enrique. “Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming.” 1989. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/536.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biaggi, Roberto Enrique. “Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming.” 1989. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Biaggi RE. Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 1989. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/536.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Biaggi RE. Paleogeography and Paleoenvironments of the Lower Unit, Fossil Butte Member, Eocene Green River Formation, Southwestern Wyoming. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 1989. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/536

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Loma Linda University

2. Britton, Douglas R. The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode.

Degree: MS, Geology, 1988, Loma Linda University

Theories regarding the taphonomy of fishes in lacustrine environments have traditionally relied on an anoxic water column to explain the excellent preservation. This concept has never been directly tested in modern lacustrine environments that are thought to be analogous to the lacustrine environments predicted by the Stratified-lake Model. This research tested that model by searching for fish remains in 38 collected bottom samples of six modern lacustrine analogues, including Fayetteville Green Lake, New York. The bottom sediments of a warm, holomictic, shallow, and saline lake (Salton Sea, California) were also examined. Although laminated sediments were found in all of the lakes studied, only the Salton Sea sediments contained fish remains. This was surprising in that one would have expected the opposite: abundant fish remains in the stratified lakes and few, if any in the non-stratified, saline lake. In addition to the above described study, a preliminary study of the taphonomic processes effecting fish carcasses was carried out at Lake Perris, CA. Fresh fish carcasses were lowered in buckets to the bottom of the lake in both the epilimnion (water temperature >15 deg. c. and oxygenated) as well as the hypolimnion (water temperatureanoxic), directly testing the effects of oxygen content, temperature, and pressure on the preservation of fishes. In the warm, oxygenated water decomposition took place, producing enough gasses in the fish bodies to cause them to float to the surface. In the cool, anoxic environment, decomposition of the fleshy parts was initiated, but not enough gasses were produced to cause the fish to float to the surface. Further study is needed to better understand the separate effects of oxygen content, temperature, and pressure on the taphonomy of fishes. The results of this research strongly suggest that anoxia alone is not adequate to preserve fish remains and that some other physical, chemical, and/or biological condition may be necessary for the preservation of fishes. The results obtained at Salton Sea suggests that saline, alkaline lake waters may be important in the taphonomic process. Further studies in these environments should be productive. Advisors/Committee Members: H. Paul Buchheim, Leonard Brand, Lanny H. Fisk, Earl Lathrop.

Subjects/Keywords: Aquaculture and Fisheries; Biology; Paleobiology; Stratigraphy; Paleoecology; Lake Ecology; Loma Linda University. Geological Sciences program  – Dissertations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Britton, D. R. (1988). The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/553

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Britton, Douglas R. “The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode.” 1988. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/553.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Britton, Douglas R. “The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode.” 1988. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Britton DR. The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 1988. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/553.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Britton DR. The Occurrence of Fish Remains in Modern Lake Systems : A Test of the Stratified-Lake Mode. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 1988. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/553

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.