Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Lincoln University" +contributor:("Gibbs, Shirley"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Lincoln University

1. Manhire, Jessica. Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

Case studies of three councils were undertaken in New Zealand on the perspectives, opportunities, and barriers to the use of Web 2.0 technologies for participation in planning. All councils, involved in this study, saw the importance of Web 2.0 and wanted to increase its use. There was some Web 2.0 used by the councils, including social media, and mobile applications. Each of the three councils wanted to increase the use of visual forms of communication, such as photos and videos. Current use of Web 2.0 tended to be for wider government processes. However, interactive mapping, was utilised by two of the three councils largely for planning purposes. The councils believed the uptake of technologies depend on whether it was relevant and appropriate for the area the council serves. Interviewees of this study still believed there was a place for traditional methods of communication, even if some forms such as press releases have become irrelevant. It was generally believed that Web 2.0 could be more suitable for some people and provide alternative consultation methods. Perspectives on what the barriers were towards the utilisation of technologies differed between interviewees and included people not recognising the benefit the use of Web 2.0 can provide, and financial and technological barriers. The use of Web 2.0 for public participation was assessed against Sherry Arnstein’s A Ladder of Citizen Participation and Nabatchi and Mergel’s Types of Public Involvement in Decision Making. The councils used the technology to inform the public and there was also evidence of consultation being achieved using Web 2.0. Advisors/Committee Members: Gibbs, Shirley.

Subjects/Keywords: Web 2.0; participation; planning; social media; e-planning; public participation; citizen participation; local government

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Manhire, J. (2016). Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manhire, Jessica. “Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manhire, Jessica. “Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils.” 2016. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Manhire J. Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Manhire J. Participation 2.0 and planning: Web 2.0 technologies for planning and policy-making in New Zealand councils. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

2. Ghimire, Dipendra. The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project.

Degree: 2017, Lincoln University

Agile software is a collection of software development methods based on iterative and incremental development processes. In an Agile software development approach, the requirements and solutions are obtained through the collaboration and coordination of cross-functional teams with the customer. Agile software development processes aim to produce higher quality software than traditional approaches, and this is supported by both anecdotal and empirical evidence. However, there is little understanding about the relationship between the software development team and the product owner, and the impact this relationship has on project outcomes. The Teamwork model can be used to understand the relationships in the team using Agile software development. Agile software development adopts sets of practices and roles for organizing work during a software development project. However, some challenges exist in Agile software development that impact on the relationships between development team and the product owner. This research identifies these challenges with Agile and explains their impact on the relationship using the Teamwork model. To understand the relationship challenges, a mixed method multi-study approach was undertaken. Data collection from participants involved two instruments: an online questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Responses from the online questionnaire were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical methods, and thematic analysis methods were used for qualitative data analysis of the interviews. Two studies were conducted, one with software development teams and one with product owners. Discussion of the results from both studies are presented and then compared in order to understand the relationships from both perspectives. The findings indicated that there were challenges in communication, project requirements, project priorities and project timelines within the team as well as between the team and the product owner. Challenges in communication, project priorities, interpersonal issues and project requirements, have an impact on the completion time of the project. The Teamwork model explained some of the relationship challenges between the Agile software development team and the customer. Challenges that fall outside the original Teamwork model contributed to understanding what factors constituted effective teamwork when applying an Agile process to software development. As a result of the findings from this current research, a revision to the Teamwork model was proposed that introduced two additional constructs: team motivation and organizational culture to the model. Team motivation impacts on the coordination, communication and team support. Organizational culture sets the overall context for the relationship between product owner and software development team. Communication within the relationship has the highest impact on project outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Charters, Stuart, Gibbs, Shirley.

Subjects/Keywords: Agile software development; Agile software teams; teamwork and coordination; software development; team building; development

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghimire, D. (2017). The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10074

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghimire, Dipendra. “The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project.” 2017. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10074.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghimire, Dipendra. “The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project.” 2017. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ghimire D. The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10074.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ghimire D. The impact of the relationship between the customer and the software development team on the outcome of a software development project. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10074

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.