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You searched for +publisher:"Lincoln University" +contributor:("Gash, Alan"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Holmes, Thomas. Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

A field experiment was conducted to quantify the carbohydrate distribution in perennial (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops from anthesis to harvest. To do this, first year crops of diploid perennial ryegrass (‘Samson’) and a diploid Italian ryegrass cultivar (‘Progrow’) were sown on 14th May and 16th September 2015. A subsequent application of Moddus® (a.i. 250 g/l Trinexapac ethyl) plant growth regulator at three rates (0, 1,600 and 3,200 ml/ha) was applied at Zakoks growth stage 32. Moddus® increased perennial and Italian ryegrass seed yield by approximately 29% from 1,600 ml/ha (1,651 kg/ha) to 3,200 ml/ha (2,134 kg/ha), with similar yields between 0 ml/ha (1,296 kg/ha) and 1,600 ml/ha. The seed yield increase in perennial and Italian ryegrass was achieved through increased number of seed produced per spikelets. The vegetative stem length in perennial and Italian ryegrass was reduced from 62 cm to 41 cm by application of 1,600 ml/ha of Moddus® and further reduced to 36 cm with 3,200 ml/ha. The perennial ryegrass’s stem component dry weight and water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentration were constant from anthesis through untill harvest. Despite Moddus® reducing the stem length and its storage capacity a large amount of WSC remained in the stem components. Perennial ryegrass had the capacity to fill and improve seed yield accumulating WSC simultaneously and converting this into starch up to harvest at 37 days after anthesis (DAA) with little or no remobilisation of WSC in the stem. Moddus® decreased Italian ryegrass’s stem components dry weight by 37% and WSC by 42% . The effect of Moddus® suggests the source and sink relationship between the stem and developing seed has been modified.The Italian ryegrass seed dry weight increased up to 7 DAA and declined until harvest with WSC and starch illustrating a similar pattern. When maximum seed weight, WSC and starch was achieved the stem component begun to decline. This demonstrates that Italian ryegrass stem may play a role in seed filling under conditions of limited assimilate supply with stem assimilate reserves remobilised to the developing seed. Moddus® reduced overall lodging at the highest rate of 3,200 ml/ha and delayed the onset of lodging at the lower rate. Lodging progressed more quickly and had a greater effect on perennial ryegrass than Italian ryegrass. Lodging reduced perennial ryegrass seed yield with less WSC in the seed of control plants of 0 ml/ha (49.91 mg) compared to the highest Moddus® treatment of 3,200 ml/ha (59.63 mg). Italian ryegrass showed similar seed WSC between the control (88.6 mg) and the two Moddus® treatments of 1,600 ml/ha (94 mg) and 3,200 ml/ha (85.5 mg). This showed the degree which two ryegrass species seed sinks can compete for available assimilates. The relative lower seed depression in lodged Italian ryegrass compared to the perennial indicates a higher compensation potential. The Italian showed the ability to partition more assimilate reserves from the stem and… Advisors/Committee Members: Gash, Alan.

Subjects/Keywords: perennial ryegrass; Italian ryegrass; Lolium perenne L.; Lolium multiflorum L.; seed crop; seed yield; anthesis; assimilation; flowering; harvest index; lodging; Moddus; Trinexapac ethyl; water soluble carbohydrates

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APA (6th Edition):

Holmes, T. (2016). Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7770

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holmes, Thomas. “Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed August 15, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7770.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holmes, Thomas. “Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops.” 2016. Web. 15 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Holmes T. Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2018 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7770.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Holmes T. Seed yield and carbohydrate distribution in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seed crops. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7770

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

2. Opoku, Elvis. Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage.

Degree: 2017, Lincoln University

The study reported in this thesis was conducted during 2015/2016 at Lincoln University, New Zealand, to investigate the effect of row width and plant population density on yield and nutritive quality of maize silage (Pioneer Hybrid P7524). A Randomized Complete Block Design was used. The main treatments were row widths (0.76m and 0.38m) whilst the sub-treatments were intra-row spacings (0.12m, 0.18m and 0.24m), giving a total of six plant population densities (54,824, 73,099, 109,649, 146,198 and 219,298 plants/ha) with four replicates each. The crops were harvested at 30-35% DM and ensiled in PVC type silo for 100 days. Grain, DM and stover yield per unit area increased significantly with increasing plant population due to increasing radiation interception. However, low leaf chlorophyll concentration was also found to reduce grain and DM yield in spite of high radiation interception. Also, at constant or same intra row spacing, the 0.38m row width recorded percentage grain increases of between 78.6% and 127.6% which were almost twice or more compared with the 0.76m row width. Increasing plant population also increased leaf chlorophyll concentration of plants during the initial stages of plant growth and development. Plant population density and row width did not have any significant impact on the nutritive value of maize silage. Advisors/Committee Members: Gash, Alan.

Subjects/Keywords: acid detergent fibre; crude protein; dry matter yield; leaf chlorophyll concentration; neutral detergent fibre (NDF); metabolisable energy; row spacing; plant population; population density; chlorophyll content; photosynthetically active radiation

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APA (6th Edition):

Opoku, E. (2017). Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/8443

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Opoku, Elvis. “Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage.” 2017. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed August 15, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/8443.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Opoku, Elvis. “Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage.” 2017. Web. 15 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Opoku E. Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2017. [cited 2018 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/8443.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Opoku E. Effect of row width and plant population density on yield and quality of maize (Zea mays) silage. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/8443

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

3. Yuan, Ye. Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

Vermicomposting has been proposed as a sustainable technique for managing various types of organic wastes. The aims of this study were to test the feasibility of vermicomposting two of Canterbury’s problematic wastes (organic municipal waste and the used animal bedding) and to evaluate the vermicompost generated from them for use in horticultural production. The research first examined how changes in waste proportions and types affected earthworm growth and reproduction. Vermicompost quality in terms of its nutrient and agronomic values was then considered, through the use of a series of pot experiments with Pak Choi plants. These experiments investigated influencing factors such as the type of medium, source of vermicompost, application rate, application method, processing method and chemical fertiliser addition on plant growth. The results of the vermicomposting experiments showed that the two waste streams could be a valuable food source for earthworms, and it found that the ideal combination in terms of earthworm growth and reproduction and final vermicompost quality was a mix of 80% fresh shredded waste and 20% used animal bedding. The vermicompost produced from this mix generally had good agronomic value, but a low nitrogen content. Coir had high vermicompost use efficiency, and plants grown in coir with a 10% vermicompost addition grew as well as plants in a standard potting mix. Mixing chemical fertiliser and vermicompost together with coir led to further improvements in plant growth, compared with the use of vermicompost alone. These results demonstrated that it is feasible to recycle the two problematic wastes by vermicomposting, and that the vermicompost produced is beneficial as a plant fertiliser. Coir could be a promising material for use in horticultural production when combined with vermicompost. However, further research is required to investigate ways of using these resources in the most efficient manner. Advisors/Committee Members: Dickinson, Nicholas, Gash, Alan.

Subjects/Keywords: Coir; vermicomposting; municipal composting; municipal organic wastes; plant growth; waste recycling; recycling; composting

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yuan, Y. (2016). Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yuan, Ye. “Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed August 15, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yuan, Ye. “Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth.” 2016. Web. 15 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Yuan Y. Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2018 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yuan Y. Vermicomposting, waste recycling and plant growth. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.