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You searched for +publisher:"Lincoln University" +contributor:("Barnes, Maurice"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Morton, J. D. The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei.

Degree: 1989, Lincoln University

Infection of barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves with the rust fungus, Puccinia hordei, causes changes in the host protein synthesis. This thesis analyses these changes in the barley cultivar Triumph following inoculation of 7-day-old leaves with either a virulent or an avirulent race of P. hordei. The initial approach was to isolate membrane-bound polysomes from infected leaves, translate them in vitro and analyse the translation products. These products include the integral membrane proteins which were expected to be involved in the response of the host to the pathogen. A method based on differential centrifugation in the presence of a ribonuclease-inhibiting buffer was developed for separating membrane-bound polysomes from the rest of the cytoplasmic polysomes. Membrane-bound polysomes were found to comprise one fifth of the total polysomes in the leaves. Analysis of the translation products of membrane-bound polysomes by SDS-PAGE showed them to be of higher average molecular weight than those from free polysomes. Comparison of polypeptides produced by membrane-bound polysomes from healthy and inoculated plants showed some differences however the low yield of membrane-bound polysomes made it difficult to obtain conclusive results. Thus it was decided to isolate total polysomes by including 1% Triton X-100 in the extraction buffer. Polysomes were extracted from 12 to 72 h after inoculation. Infection caused a decline in yield of polysomes during this period when compared with healthy leaves of the same age. Polysomes isolated 16 h after inoculation with the virulent race were 20% less efficient at translation than polysomes from control leaves. In contrast polysome isolated from leaves inoculated with the avirulent race were 20% more efficient. Analysis of the labelled translation products by SDS-PAGE and fluorography showed relative increases in the synthesis of some proteins by 16 h after inoculation with either race when compared to products from healthy leaves. Protein synthesis in the infected plants was further analysed by in vivo labelling and one- and two-dimensional PAGE. The fluorographs revealed increased synthesis of a group of proteins from 58 to 116 kDa starting 12 h after inoculation with either race of P. hordei; confirming the results from the polysome translations. Two polypeptides with molecular weights of about 66 kDa were found to increase following infection only with the virulent race. By three days after inoculation with either fungal race the most obvious change in protein synthesis was a marked decrease in the synthesis of the two most prominent polypeptides with molecular weights of 15 and 51 kDa which were considered to be the subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. The elicitor hypothesis, in attempting to explain cultivar-specific resistance in plants, postulates that resistance is controlled by the interaction of specific fungal elicitors and plant receptors and that this interaction which only occurs between resistant hosts and avirulent pathogens triggers specific… Advisors/Committee Members: Barnes, Maurice.

Subjects/Keywords: cereals; barley; Puccinia hordei; cultivar-specific; disease resistance; polysomes; proteins; membrane-bound; translation; two-dimensional; electrophoresis; rubisco; plant pathogens

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morton, J. D. (1989). The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1950

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morton, J D. “The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei.” 1989. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1950.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morton, J D. “The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei.” 1989. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Morton JD. The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1989. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1950.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morton JD. The effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordei. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1989. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1950

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

2. Pickering, Gary James. The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase.

Degree: 1997, Lincoln University

In small scale trials, a process for the glucose oxidase (GOX) - catalysed oxidation of glucose in grape juice was developed and optimised. Up to 87% utilisation of glucose was achieved, producing wines of ca. 6.4% alcohol. This equates to a 40% reduction in alcohol content compared with conventionally processed wine. The effect of GOX -processing on the compositional, stability, and sensory properties of Müller-Thurgau and Riesling wines was investigated. Large amounts of gluconic acid are formed during GOX-treatment of juice, and a large portion of this is retained in the finished wine. In general GOX wines contained a higher concentration of esters and fatty acids, possibly due to alterations in juice amino acid composition. Relatively little change was observed in the concentration of the other volatile compounds. GOX wines show increased S0₂-binding power compared to control wines. GOX wines also had a more golden colour, possible due to increased quinone production and regeneration of oxidisable phenolic substrate. They were stable against browning after six months of bottle age, whereas control wines continued to brown throughout the two year period of monitored aging. GOX wine appeared to be stable with respect to 'pinking' reactions and other parameters examined. Although heat/cold tests suggest they are at more risk of developing a protein haze, no haze was observed. GOX-treatment of Riesling juice significantly modified the taste and appearance attributes of the resultant wine, while other flavour parameters were relatively unaffected. The exceptions were fruit aroma intensity and length of flavour, which were generally decreased in GOX wines primarily due to the juice aeration required during processing. Perceived viscosity and density were relatively unchanged in GOX wines, probably due to the high acidity which itself is a detracting characteristic. The effect of ethanol on the perception of fullness in white wine was investigated using a time-intensity methodology. A general pattern of increase in perceived viscosity and density occurs with increasing alcohol content up to 10 and 12% alcohol v/v respectively. The results support the anecdotal evidence that low-alcohol wines generally have reduced fullness compared with 'full-strength' wines, but this may not hold for wines above 12% and possibly 10% alcohol content. These findings raise some interesting questions on desirable alcohol levels for wine in general. In addition, the temporal parameters important in explaining perceived viscosity and density in white wine were determined. Advisors/Committee Members: Heatherbell, David, Barnes, Maurice.

Subjects/Keywords: reduced-alcohol wine; low-alcohol wine; glucose oxidase-catalase; reduced sugar grape juice; juice oxidation; time-intensity; mouthfeel; body; weight; viscosity; fullness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pickering, G. J. (1997). The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1979

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pickering, Gary James. “The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase.” 1997. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1979.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pickering, Gary James. “The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase.” 1997. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Pickering GJ. The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1997. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1979.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pickering GJ. The production of reduced-alcohol wine using glucose oxidase. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1979

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

3. Rhodes, Lesley. The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina.

Degree: 1987, Lincoln University

Extracellular bacteriolytic activity was obtained when Gliomastix murorum var. felina was grown on heat-killed Bacillus subtilis cells (2.5 mg ml⁻¹) suspended in a defined salts solution, buffered at pH5 or at pH7. Maximal yields were measured when shake flask cultures were incubated in light at 30°C for 10 days. Lytic supernatants were designated E₁ and E₃ (fungus grown at pH5, supernatant optimally active at pH3.6 and pH8.0 respectively) and E₂ (fungus grown at pH7.0, supernatant optimally active at pH7.5). E₁ was investigated further and found to be inducible and to be repressed by glucose addition. E₁ was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column. The pH optimum was 3.4 (ionic strength 0.051 and the molecular weight was estimated by gel filtration as 17000. The mode of action of the bacteriolytic enzyme was that of a β-N-acetylmuramidase. Specific activity was increased 7-fold (from 61.4 units mg⁻¹ protein to 44B units mg⁻¹ protein). Advisors/Committee Members: Howard, B. H., Barnes, Maurice.

Subjects/Keywords: bacteriolytic enzymes; Gliomastix murorum var. felina; Bacillus subtilis; ammonium sulphate; purification; fungi; growth conditions; bacteriolytic activity; fungal biomass; glucose

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rhodes, L. (1987). The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4660

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rhodes, Lesley. “The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina.” 1987. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4660.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rhodes, Lesley. “The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina.” 1987. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Rhodes L. The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1987. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4660.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rhodes L. The bacteriolytic enzymes of Gliomastix murorum var. Felina. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1987. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4660

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.