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You searched for +publisher:"Kent State University" +contributor:("Jefferis, Eric"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kent State University

1. Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.

Degree: PhD, College of Public Health, 2018, Kent State University

Persons taking antipsychotic medications are disproportionately overweight, which may well be influenced by social factors. The objective of this study is to characterize the relationships between social support, lifestyle habit relating to diet and physical activity, and weight status among persons who have initiated psychiatric pharmacological treatment.This is a secondary analysis of data from the Community Mental Health Research Initiative in Northeast Ohio. Self-report data from a probability subgroup sample (n=55) of a larger research initiative (N = 203), inclusive of men and women over the age of 20 who are currently taking psychiatric medication were analyzed. Logistic Regression modeling was performed to examine the associations between social support from friends, lifestyle habit, and the odds of being overweight. Social support holds as an important component when considering weight status among persons who have experienced or are at risk for experiencing weight gain induced by psychiatric medications such as antipsychotics, as unsatisfactory social support from friends showed a significant association with overweight status. Results from this study indicate a need for greater efforts to improve social support for persons who have undergone antipsychotic treatment, with emphasis placed on perceived satisfaction with support from friendships. Advisors/Committee Members: Jefferis, Eric (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Public Health; Mental Health; Anti-psychotic; Psychiatric; Psychotropic; Medication; Overweight; Obesity; Social Support; Weight Status; Public Health; Mental Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Igah, M. O. (2018). An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. “An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. “An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.” 2018. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Igah MO. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535.

Council of Science Editors:

Igah MO. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535


Kent State University

2. Mitchell, Susanne. Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs).

Degree: PhD, College of Public Health, 2019, Kent State University

Police body-worn cameras (BWCs) have been proposed as a technological solution to advance and illuminate policing efforts and strengthen the relationships between law enforcement agencies and the communities they protect and serve. Proponents of BWCs claim that the technology has numerous benefits, including improving evidentiary quality and providing opportunities for officer training, the ability to reduce police use of force and citizen complaints, as well as provide an objective view into the world of policing, thereby increasing transparency and accountability. This research explored the impact of police BWCs, as well as citizen perceptions of the technology, and of BWC video evidence. First, a quasi-experimental research study examined the impact of the BWCs on police use-of-force and citizen complaints in coordination with a mid-sized police department in the Midwest. Results indicated that the total number of use-of-force incidents and complaints filed against patrol officers declined from the year prior to BWC deployment and the year after, and that there were statistically significant effects detected when use-of-force data was modeled using Poisson regression analyses. The results from survey research found that public perceptions of police BWCs are generally positive, the majority of individuals support police wearing BWCs, and there was strong support for the notions that BWCs will improve transparency, reduce excess force by police, and that the technology will reduce other types police misconduct. Yet fewer participants agreed the technology can decrease racial tension, improve citizen trust in police, or improve police relationships with citizens. Lastly, while some individuals believe BWC video evidence can eliminate biases from influencing judgements about police-citizen interactions because the video should show viewers exactly what happened, results from this research challenge that notion. Results demonstrated that individuals’ opinions of what they view are shaped by demographic characteristics, contextual information and various biases, such as those measured by the Right Wing Authoritarianism, Social Dominance Orientation, and Identification with Police scales. BWCs indubitably allow individuals an additional view into an interaction beyond a police report and this may result in substantial changes in public opinions of police activity, in both positive and negative ways. Advisors/Committee Members: Jefferis, Eric (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Behavioral Sciences; Criminology; Public Health; body-worn camera, BWC, police, policing, perceptions, complaints, use-of-force, community

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mitchell, S. (2019). Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs). (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1555332027726849

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mitchell, Susanne. “Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs).” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1555332027726849.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mitchell, Susanne. “Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs).” 2019. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Mitchell S. Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1555332027726849.

Council of Science Editors:

Mitchell S. Evaluating impacts and defining public perceptions of police body-worn cameras (BWCs). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2019. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1555332027726849

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