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You searched for +publisher:"Kent State University" +contributor:("Doheny, Margaret"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kent State University

1. McNett, Molly M. Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury.

Degree: PhD, College of Nursing, 2008, Kent State University

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects over 1.4 million Americans every year. Interdisciplinary care focuses on treating the primary brain injury and limiting further brain damage from secondary brain injury. Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses have an integral role in preventing secondary brain injury; however, little is known about how ICU nurses make judgments when managing secondary brain injury. The purpose of this study was to examine how physiological, situational, and nurse variables influenced ICU nurse judgments about patient risk of secondary brain injury and determining appropriate levels of intervention. This study was guided by social judgment theory and incorporated a multiple segment factorial survey design. Vignettes reflecting the complexity of real life patient scenarios were randomly generated using different values of each independent variable. Anonymous vignette surveys were administered to ICU registered nurses from two Level I trauma centers. Multiple regression was used to examine which variables influenced judgments about secondary brain injury. Sixty seven nurses completed study surveys. Judgments about risk for secondary brain injury were influenced by oxygen saturation (O2sat), intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), mechanism of injury, primary diagnosis, and nursing shift. Judgments about level of intervention were influenced by O2sat, CPP, and nursing shift. The initial judgments made by nurses were the most significant variable predicting follow up judgments. Findings from this study provide information about factors influencing nurse judgments when managing secondary brain injury. This information will serve as the basis for future educational initiatives for nurses, which may improve management of secondary brain injury and improve patient outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Doheny, Margaret (Committee Chair), Sedlak, Carol (Committee Co-Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Nursing; nurse judgment; traumatic brain injury; secondary brain injury

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNett, M. M. (2008). Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1205339970

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNett, Molly M. “Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1205339970.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNett, Molly M. “Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury.” 2008. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

McNett MM. Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1205339970.

Council of Science Editors:

McNett MM. Intensive Care Unit Nurse Judgments About Secondary Brain Injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1205339970


Kent State University

2. Thoman, Joan Ellen. The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease.

Degree: PhD, College of Nursing, 2009, Kent State University

The purpose of this study was to describe the process by which persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus self-manage their disease. Diabetes, a chronic disease, requires complex, individual, long-term self-management. Grounded theory methods were used to develop a theoretical framework. Participation criteria included adults over 18 who had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus of one to two years and had participated in a Diabetes Self-Management Skills and Training (DSMT) program. A selective sample of 21 participants was recruited from health care facilities in Northeast Ohio. Dealing with Type 2 Diabetes was identified as the psychosocial problem shared by participants. The psychosocial process for this problem was called Evolving Diabetes Self. The psychosocial process of Evolving Diabetes Self encompasses four phases with interrelated categories within each phase that impact the psychosocial problem of Dealing with Type 2 Diabetes. The four phases are as follows: (a) Getting the Diagnosis, (b) Realizing Options, (c) Making Decisions, and (d) Living the Consequences. This study provided a theoretical framework for describing the processes by which individuals with type 2 diabetes manage their disease. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease requiring complex and lifelong changes. Health care providers are in an integral position to facilitate change from an acute care emphasis to a chronic care framework within organizations (insurance, hospitals, and out-patient departments) as well as to change policies and reimbursement protocols for care of diabetics. Advisors/Committee Members: Sedlak, Carol (Committee Co-Chair), Doheny, Margaret (Committee Co-Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Nursing; diabetes; self-management; type 2; qualitative

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thoman, J. E. (2009). The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1258308934

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thoman, Joan Ellen. “The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1258308934.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thoman, Joan Ellen. “The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease.” 2009. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Thoman JE. The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1258308934.

Council of Science Editors:

Thoman JE. The Process By Which Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Their Disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1258308934

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