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You searched for +publisher:"Kennesaw State University" +contributor:("Thomas McElroy"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Kennesaw State University

1. Bullard, Jennifer D. The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio.

Degree: MSIB, Biology, 2016, Kennesaw State University

Amphetamines are frequently prescribed to young children for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Due to the recent rise in ADHD diagnoses and the resulting increase in amphetamine intake in children, we investigated how amphetamine exposure impacts the development of stereotyped behaviors and the neural circuit that governs these behaviors. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) was used as our model organism because of the extensively studied developmental milestones these fish provide. Using escape responses as a behavior model, we exposed embryos to three doses of amphetamine (10 μg/ml, 20 μg/ml, and 30 μg/ml) environmentally during the first 48 hours of development and used high-speed videography to identify escape behavior deficits at two time points. All doses of amphetamine exposed embryos took significantly longer to complete escape behaviors compared to controls at both time points and also displayed an increase in spastic behaviors. Also, amphetamine treated fish took significantly longer to emerge from their surrounding chorions compared to controls, which suggests developmental delays. Amphetamine fish exhibited morphological abnormalities that included tail underdevelopment, lordosis, and significantly shorter body lengths. Underlying interneural deficits are further supported with fluorescent antibody staining in the spinal cord, where inhibitory expression was significantly higher in the high amphetamine dose compared to controls. This study using 24 and 48 hpf zebrafish offers a novel perspective on early amphetamine exposure during peak developmental times. Furthermore, the combination of delayed stereotyped behaviors and morphological irregularities in this study helps provide insight to the existing literature on development and early amphetamine exposure. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Thomas McElroy, Dr. Troy Mutchler.

Subjects/Keywords: amphetamine; zebrafish; development; escape response; ADHD; Biology; Integrative Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bullard, J. D. (2016). The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/11

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bullard, Jennifer D. “The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio.” 2016. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/11.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bullard, Jennifer D. “The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio.” 2016. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bullard JD. The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/11.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bullard JD. The Effects of Amphetamine Exposure on Neurodevelopment and Behavior in Early Life Stages of Danio Rerio. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/11

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

2. Lutsch, Kelly. Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans.

Degree: MSIB, Biology, 2019, Kennesaw State University

Pseudogymnoascus destructans is an emerging fungal pathogen causing precipitous declines in North American bats due to the development of white-nose syndrome. Since 2006, 34 U.S. states and 7 Canadian provinces have confirmed the presence of P. destructans. Due to the rapid spread of P. destructans across the eastern United States, habitat characterization and disease monitoring has become vital to conserving remnant populations. Bats have been observed in multiple states using non-traditional habitat, such as interstate culverts, for roosting. To investigate their use of anthropogenic structures in coastal Georgia, an area where P. destructans has yet-to-be detected, comprehensive bridge and culvert surveys were conducted during the hibernation season. Over 140 swabs of bats and substrates were collected and analyzed for fungal presence using qPCR. Monthly culvert surveys were conducted to assess bat presence and collect culvert temperature data. Seasonal data further characterized optimal tri-colored bat habitat and, along with WNS surveys, identify suitable habitat for developing WNS. This data addresses the knowledge gap regarding the seasonality of bat use of bridges and culverts in coastal Georgia, P. destructans presence and burden, and the potential role bridge and culvert roosts play in disease transmission. Advisors/Committee Members: Jonathan McMurry, Christopher Sanford, Thomas McElroy.

Subjects/Keywords: bat; tri-colored bat; culvert; P. destructans; disease; coastal; Georgia; Biology; Integrative Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lutsch, K. (2019). Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/44

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lutsch, Kelly. “Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans.” 2019. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/44.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lutsch, Kelly. “Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans.” 2019. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Lutsch K. Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/44.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lutsch K. Assessment of Culverts and Bridges as Roosting Habitat for Perimyotis subflavus (tri-colored bat) and Disease Transmission Corridors for Pseudogymnoascus destructans. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/44

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

3. Johnson, Deayne M. Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

Degree: MSIB, Biology, 2014, Kennesaw State University

Contamination of soils with lead (Pb) continues to pose a risk to the health of humans especially in residential urban areas. Remediation of these soils is necessary to reduce the amount of Pb and alleviate risk to human health. Phytoextraction of Pb through chemically induced accumulation of Pb in the harvestable foliage and removal of contaminated plant material has great potential in offering a solution to this environmental problem. The effects of the combined application of a soil fungicide (benomyl), synthetic chelates (ethylenediamineteteraacetic acid, EDTA), and foliar-Fe supplement on lead (Pb) phytoextraction from contaminated soil by switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was examined. Leadcontaminated (76 mg Pb kg−1) urban topsoil collected from Atlanta was placed in pots (n=32) seeded with switchgrass. Pots were arranged in a completely randomized design with the following treatments: (C) Control, (B) Benomyl, (E) EDTA, (F) Foliar-Fe, (BE) Benomyl + EDTA, (BF) Benomyl + Foliar-Fe (FE) Foliar-Fe + EDTA, (BFE) Benomyl + Foliar-Fe + EDTA. Each treatment was replicated with four pots for each treatment combination and five plants per pot. Chemical treatments were initiated at 82 days after planting (DAP) when leaf tips showed yellowing. On 82 DAP, benomyl (20 mg kg-1 soil) was applied to the soil of plants in treatments B, BE, BF, and BFE. EDTA was added (6.2 mg kg-1 total) in 8 split applications for plants in treatments E, BE, FE, and BFE. On 92 and 96 DAP, EDTA 0.1 mmol kg-1 was applied to the soil of plants in ETDA treatments, and on days 100, 106, 112, 118, 127, and 135 DAP 1 mmol kg-1 was added to plants in EDTA treatments. On 103, 109, and 166 DAP, foliar-Fe (20 mg L-1 Iron (II) Sulfate Heptahydrate) was applied directly in three doses to the above-ground foliage of plants in treatments F, BF, FE, and BFE. Plants were harvested at 155 DAP. Samples from both the shoots and roots were analyzed for element concentration (Fe, Mn, P, Pb, and Zn) using either inductively coupled plasma (argon) atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or atomic absorption spectrometer (AA-Spec). Plant growth and soil element data were analyzed for significant differences among individual treatment combination means (Control, B, E, F, BE, BF, FE, and BFE) using one-way ANOVA with Fisher’s Test for Least Significant Difference as a post-hoc test. Additionally, data were analyzed for categorical differences and interaction effects for treatment with benomyl, EDTA, and foliar-Fe using General Linear Model. All statistical analyses were run in Minitab® (version 17.1.0) (Minitab Inc. 2013) with statistical significance accepted at 5% confidence level (α=0.05). Shoot Pb concentration did not vary significantly among treatments. However, increased biomass in the shoots of plants in the EDTA treatment resulted in an increase of total extracted Pb in the shoots: 0.17 mg in plants treated with EDTA. This value was a 24% increase above the Control plants (0.13 mg). Plants treated with EDTA had significantly higher root Pb concentration (117 mg… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Sigurdur Greipsson, Dr. Thomas McElroy, Dr. Daniel M. Deocampo.

Subjects/Keywords: lead; edta; foliar-fe; phytoextraction; switchgrass; remediation; Biology; Integrative Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, D. M. (2014). Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Deayne M. “Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).” 2014. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed December 10, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Deayne M. “Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).” 2014. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson DM. Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson DM. Induced Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Urban Soil Through Manipulation of Rhizosphere and Plant Biogeochemical Functions in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/integrbiol_etd/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.