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You searched for +publisher:"Kennesaw State University" +contributor:("Dr. Torsten M. Pieper"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Kennesaw State University

1. Williams, Ralph I, Jr. Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach.

Degree: Management, Business Administration, 2015, Kennesaw State University

For any type of organization, performance represents the measure of outcomes, goals, and aspirations vital to various organization stakeholders; thus performance is an important research variable (Seijts, Latham, Tasa, & Latham, 2004, Simon, 1964). Family businesses are different from non-family businesses in that the family subsystem and the business subsystem overlap and interact to form the family business system. The desired outcomes, goals, and aspirations of each family business are a product of its particular family and business sub-systems. Thus, in family business, especially privately owned entities, performance is of particular interest since families can set their goals in their own ways, which may go well beyond financial outcomes. Despite notable recent advances, especially on conceptual grounds, current approaches to measuring performance in family business are limited by a focus solely on financial measures, and current approaches fail to acknowledge that goals are idiosyncratic to each family business. The purpose of this research was to begin the process of developing a performance measurement scale that is holistic – including the entire set of family business goals, both financial and non-financial – and considers the idiosyncratic nature of family businesses. The present study produced a family business performance measurement scale that employs twenty-one goals spread among six latent constructs. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Torsten M. Pieper, Dr. Joseph H. Astrachan.

Subjects/Keywords: family business; performance; goals; Business Administration, Management, and Operations; Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations; Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, Ralph I, J. (2015). Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/13

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Ralph I, Jr. “Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach.” 2015. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed February 16, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/13.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Ralph I, Jr. “Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach.” 2015. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams, Ralph I J. Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/13.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Williams, Ralph I J. Measuring Family Business Performance: A Holistic, Idiosyncratic Approach. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/13

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

2. Reich, Robert Weichel. The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success.

Degree: DBA, Management, 2013, Kennesaw State University

Most theories in merger and acquisition (M&A) research use an individual or group level of analysis and address behavioral issues in M&A integration and adaptation. Relatively few studies apply a firm level analysis to investigate strategic issues pertaining to autonomy and decision-making authority. This study used neo-institutional theory to investigate the relationship between acquired firm autonomy and integration success at the firm level. It also sought to identify possible moderating impacts of an acquired firm’s pre-acquisition organizational archetype, e.g. professionally managed private, or founder owned and operated, as well as the acquired firm’s leadership experience with previous M&A integration. Furthermore, unlike the majority of extant M&A literature, which commonly takes the perspective of the acquirer firm, I explored the perspective of the acquired firm. The study focused on middle market firms acquired by public corporations to provide variation of acquired firm organizational archetypes. Our results underscore the complexities of measuring a relationship between autonomy allocation and integrations success. It additionally expands the exploration of causal antecedents that influence that relationship. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Franz W. Kellermanns, Dr. Torsten M. Pieper, Dr. Rajaram Veliyath.

Subjects/Keywords: mergers and acquisitions; strategic issues; organizational archetypes; autonomy; integration; acquired firms; Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reich, R. W. (2013). The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/575

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reich, Robert Weichel. “The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success.” 2013. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed February 16, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/575.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reich, Robert Weichel. “The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success.” 2013. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Reich RW. The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/575.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Reich RW. The Impact of Post-Acquisition Autonomy upon Small to Medium Enterprise Integration Success. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/575

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

3. Casto, Charles A. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.

Degree: DBA, Management, 2014, Kennesaw State University

Several extreme events are examined in this dissertation to better understand the implications of such events for expanding the existing knowledge of crisis leadership. Through interviews with leaders that had direct leadership roles in extreme events such as the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosions, Deepwater Horizon oilrig explosion, and Super Storm Sandy, in addition to national leadership, e.g. White House Situation Room, an in-depth, cross-case analysis of leadership in extreme crises is presented. Previous literature concludes that the abilities of leaders are second only to the cause of the event itself in determining the outcome of a disaster but due to the rarity of these events, there has been limited scholarly consideration of the implications of these events for leadership research and practice. Using an inductive, qualitative approach to analyze the interviews, the results lead to several conclusions. First, there is a need for this and additional research to clarify the meaning or unique challenges that define the characteristics of an extreme event crisis especially in the most extreme cases. Second, the importance of the effects of felt emotions including mortality salience on extreme leadership is profound on the thinking and actions of leaders in these events. Third, classic crisis management and leadership theories are insufficient for explaining the needed actions in responding to extreme events. These conclusions were integrated with prior research to develop a model of crisis leadership based on a continuum of crisis events from routine to extreme. This model is developed around six leadership concepts either identified in prior research or developed based on the findings of this study. The model also identifies threshold points where routine crisis events become more extreme. At these threshold points the demands on all actors in the event, especially the leaders, become more non-linear and can result in great emotional influences on sensemaking and subsequent decision making. This dissertation concludes that leadership in this context can almost exclusively be focused on life-saving, and instinctual or emotional responses. Further the differences between leadership in dangerous military and non-military domains are examined. The implication of these findings for practitioners and future researchers is also discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Neal P. Mero, Dr. Torsten M. Pieper, Dr. Dana Hermanson.

Subjects/Keywords: Business; Strategic Management Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Casto, C. A. (2014). Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casto, Charles A. “Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.” 2014. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed February 16, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casto, Charles A. “Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.” 2014. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Casto CA. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Casto CA. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.