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You searched for +publisher:"Kennesaw State University" +contributor:("Dr. Neal P. Mero"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kennesaw State University

1. Casto, Charles A. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.

Degree: DBA, Management, 2014, Kennesaw State University

Several extreme events are examined in this dissertation to better understand the implications of such events for expanding the existing knowledge of crisis leadership. Through interviews with leaders that had direct leadership roles in extreme events such as the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosions, Deepwater Horizon oilrig explosion, and Super Storm Sandy, in addition to national leadership, e.g. White House Situation Room, an in-depth, cross-case analysis of leadership in extreme crises is presented. Previous literature concludes that the abilities of leaders are second only to the cause of the event itself in determining the outcome of a disaster but due to the rarity of these events, there has been limited scholarly consideration of the implications of these events for leadership research and practice. Using an inductive, qualitative approach to analyze the interviews, the results lead to several conclusions. First, there is a need for this and additional research to clarify the meaning or unique challenges that define the characteristics of an extreme event crisis especially in the most extreme cases. Second, the importance of the effects of felt emotions including mortality salience on extreme leadership is profound on the thinking and actions of leaders in these events. Third, classic crisis management and leadership theories are insufficient for explaining the needed actions in responding to extreme events. These conclusions were integrated with prior research to develop a model of crisis leadership based on a continuum of crisis events from routine to extreme. This model is developed around six leadership concepts either identified in prior research or developed based on the findings of this study. The model also identifies threshold points where routine crisis events become more extreme. At these threshold points the demands on all actors in the event, especially the leaders, become more non-linear and can result in great emotional influences on sensemaking and subsequent decision making. This dissertation concludes that leadership in this context can almost exclusively be focused on life-saving, and instinctual or emotional responses. Further the differences between leadership in dangerous military and non-military domains are examined. The implication of these findings for practitioners and future researchers is also discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Neal P. Mero, Dr. Torsten M. Pieper, Dr. Dana Hermanson.

Subjects/Keywords: Business; Strategic Management Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Casto, C. A. (2014). Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casto, Charles A. “Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.” 2014. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed August 12, 2020. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casto, Charles A. “Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership.” 2014. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Casto CA. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Casto CA. Crisis Management: A Qualitative Study of Extreme Event Leadership. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2014. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/etd/626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

2. Hall, Kelly R. Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance.

Degree: Management, Business Administration, 2016, Kennesaw State University

Performance feedback is an integral aspect of facilitating employee learning. Despite its importance, research suggests that when that feedback conveys a performance discrepancy, subsequent performance does not improve. Researchers have advanced reflection as a strategy for increasing feedback effectiveness and have established its value for learning and performance improvement. However, these studies have not accounted for the effects of specific types of reflection on performance. To this point, the current research examines the role of one form of reflection, counterfactual thinking, for learning after performance discrepancies. I explored boundary conditions that might influence self-focused upward counterfactual thinking—a form of reflection particularly important for learning and performance improvement—and examined whether and when such thinking influences the relationship between a baseline performance discrepancy and subsequent performance. To investigate these issues, I designed, developed, and validated a computer simulated leadership skills task and administered it to graduate and undergraduate students (N= 169) in a web-based research setting. I tested the proposed relationships using conditional process analysis. The results of this study demonstrated that when individuals encounter performance discrepancies they might attempt to reconcile such through self-focused upward counterfactual thinking. This research represents a step toward an improved understanding of reflection, performance discrepancy feedback processing, and subsequent performance effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Neal P. Mero, Dr. Robin A. Cheramie.

Subjects/Keywords: counterfactual thinking; performance feedback; reflection; simulations; Organizational Behavior and Theory; Performance Management; Training and Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hall, K. R. (2016). Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hall, Kelly R. “Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance.” 2016. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed August 12, 2020. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hall, Kelly R. “Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance.” 2016. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hall KR. Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hall KR. Reflecting on Performance Feedback: The Effect of Counterfactual Thinking on Subsequent Leader Performance. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/dba_etd/22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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