Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Kennesaw State University" +contributor:("Dr. Kimberly Cortes"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Kennesaw State University

1. Smith, Andrew. STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Secondary Education, Education, 2018, Kennesaw State University

The purpose of this research study was to examine both qualitatively and quantitatively the difference in conceptual understanding of logarithms of students participating in a traditional classroom setting in which a correspondence approach (Confrey & Smith, 1995) was used and students participating in an integrated STEM unit of logarithms and pH in which a covariational approach (Ferrari-Escolá, Martínez-Sierra, & Méndez-Guevara, 2016) was used. In addition, the researcher investigated how students make connections among different representations of logarithms and transferring knowledge between mathematics and science. A quasi-experimental design was used in which qualitative data were collected using an Observation Protocol and quantitative data were collected using the Logarithms and pH Assessment (LPA). The qualitative data showed that students in the treatment group were thinking of logarithms in a mathematics and science context at a deeper level of conceptual understanding according to Weber’s (2002) levels of understanding exponential and logarithmic functions and Park and Choi’s (2012) levels of understanding pH. In addition, the qualitative data showed that students in the integrated STEM classroom were better able to transfer their knowledge of logarithms to pH and make deeper connections among different representations of logarithms (numerical, algebraic, and graphical). However, the quantitative data from the LPA, which defines conceptual understanding as the ability to represent concept in multiple forms: written, numerical, algebraic, and graphical (Panasuk, 2010; Rittle-Johnson, Siegler, & Alibali, 2001), indicated that the traditional classroom developed students’ conceptual understanding more than the integrated STEM classroom. This study provides mathematics and science educators with relevant information about incorporating integrated STEM lessons and covariational reasoning to teach logarithms conceptually, to improve a student’s conceptual understanding of logarithms and pH, and their ability to apply mathematical knowledge to settings other than the mathematics classroom. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kimberly Cortes, Dr. Kimberly Gardner.

Subjects/Keywords: algebra; chemistry; conceptual understanding; covariational reasoning; secondary education; transfer; Science and Mathematics Education

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, A. (2018). STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seceddoc_etd/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Andrew. “STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually.” 2018. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed April 25, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seceddoc_etd/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Andrew. “STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually.” 2018. Web. 25 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith A. STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Apr 25]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seceddoc_etd/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Smith A. STEM Integration: Making Connections in Mathematics and Science by Teaching Logarithms Conceptually. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seceddoc_etd/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kennesaw State University

2. Edgeman, Kristian. The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics.

Degree: Doctor of Education in Teacher Leadership (EdD), Educational Leadership, 2018, Kennesaw State University

A decline in academic motivation, organizational skills, and the desire to learn in adolescent students cause middle grade teachers to constantly look for ways of encouraging students to complete assignments on time and achieve academic growth. Tactics such as positive reinforcement and punishments are frequently offered to adolescent students with the purpose of encouraging academic motivation. The inclusion of zeros in the grade book, although a hodgepodge grading practice, is often used as a tool to boost student motivation in prompt assignment completion; however, there is a lack of research to support this. The current study was designed to analyze the impact that a working lunch session, where students have the opportunity to make up missing assignments, verses a zero in the grade book, without the opportunity to make up missing work, can have on adolescents’ completion rate and academic achievement in mathematics. The 13-week study focused on seventh grade mathematics students in a Title I middle school in North Georgia. Along with the numerical data, students’ pre- and post-interviews were conducted to get a qualitative perspective on students’ views of punishment and how they think and feel that a zero in the grade book verses a working lunch session impacts their motivation and self-regulation to complete assignments on time and grow academically in mathematics. The intended goal of the current study will be to add to the body of research related to the use of reinforcement and its impact on student motivation as well as determine if giving zeros or a working lunch session, common practices in adolescent education, can have an impact on assignment completion rate and academic achievement. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Mei-Lin Chang, Dr. Kimberly Cortes.

Subjects/Keywords: adolescent learners; negative reinforcement verses punishment; student motivation; assignment completion rate; academic achievement; Education

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edgeman, K. (2018). The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/teachleaddoc_etd/30

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edgeman, Kristian. “The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics.” 2018. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed April 25, 2019. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/teachleaddoc_etd/30.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edgeman, Kristian. “The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics.” 2018. Web. 25 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Edgeman K. The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Apr 25]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/teachleaddoc_etd/30.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Edgeman K. The Outcomes of Offering a Working Lunch Session in Improving Adolescent Students’ Assignment Completion Rate and Academic Achievement in Mathematics. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/teachleaddoc_etd/30

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.