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You searched for +publisher:"Kansas State University" +contributor:("Robert L. Larson"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Reece, Thomas Ray. Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus.

Degree: MPH, Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, 2012, Kansas State University

Variant H1N1 influenza (vH1N1) virus is an issue both in swine production medicine and in the arena of public health. Influenza viruses can infect but not always produce disease in avian, humans and swine. Swine are unique among the three previously mentioned species in that their respiratory epithelium possesses three receptor sites for the virus types common to each of the three mentioned species. Swine influenza virus (SI) is common and widespread in nearly all Midwestern swine herds and can be transmitted by both direct contact and aerosolization. All of the three previously mentioned species have the potential to re-assort (produce virons containing genetic material of different virons to produce a unique influenza virus (IV). Because of their three specific receptor sites, swine have the greatest re-assortment capability. This re-assortment has the potential is a low mortality/high morbidity disease that is a substantial cost to the swine industry due to its negative effect on production parameters such as average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency (FE). It is a public health concern due to its potential to produce different virus types which may have increased mortality/morbidity in humans. Avian are the IV reservoir and have the ability to introduce virus types that are foreign to specific populations in all venues on the planet. It is in the mutual best interest of public health and swine production to mitigate the introduction of different virus types in swine and to control existing infections in swine populations with a goal of establishing SI-free herds. Mitigation for swine populations can occur through vaccination, diagnosis/isolation, and Biosecurity procedures designed to reduce/eliminate IV introduction into swine production facilities. In addition, preventing the interaction of infected humans with swine is another component of swine population Biosecurity. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert L. Larson.

Subjects/Keywords: vH1N1; Public Health (0573)

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APA (6th Edition):

Reece, T. R. (2012). Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus. (Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/13807

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reece, Thomas Ray. “Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus.” 2012. Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/13807.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reece, Thomas Ray. “Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus.” 2012. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Reece TR. Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/13807.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Reece TR. Public health and swine production medicine aspects of vH1N1 influenza virus. [Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/13807

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Monday, Jessica Dawn. Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds.

Degree: MSin Veterinary Biomedical Science, Department of Clinical Sciences, 2017, Kansas State University

The selection of young replacement animals can have a significant impact on beef herd reproductive performance. Replacement heifers can be utilized to improve reproductive performance by replacing mature animals that failed to meet the production with young, cycling heifers that can have the potential of improving the reproductive momentum of a herd. The use of yearling bulls in natural breeding herds has the advantage of shortening the generational interval of the herd and has the potential of reducing the cost per cow exposed as additions to the bull battery. This thesis involves two studies that investigated methods used for the selection of peripubertal replacement animals in beef herds. The first study evaluated the ability of the novel Ready-Intermediate-Problem (RIP) replacement heifer evaluation matrix to classify heifers into groups that allow producers to select for replacements that meet production goals. Beef heifers (n=341) were classified according to the RIP matrix guidelines and then exposed to AI breeding, bull breeding, or a combination of both as per the management plans for each participating herd. Following breeding season the heifers were evaluated to determine pregnancy status, pregnancy status to single AI exposure, days bred, and the number of 21 day cycles needed during breeding season to become pregnant. After breeding season, 298 (87%) of the heifers were pregnant, 204 (68%) of which became pregnant in the first 21 days of the breeding season. Probability of overall pregnancy and pregnancy after single AI exposure was not significantly associated with RIP classification. There was a significant interaction in RIP classification by 21 day cycle. The second study was a retrospective study using BSE result data to determine the proportion of yearling beef bulls that are classified as satisfactory potential breeders when reevaluated after failing their initial breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) and to identify any predictive factors at initial BSE for satisfactory performance at revaluation. The study included 2,805 beef bulls between 11 and 14 months of age at first BSE evaluated at KABSU from 2006 to 2014. Generalized linear mixed models were created to assess potential associations among breed, age, and interaction between breed and age and passing the initial evaluation and identify predictive factors for risk of passing BSE after initial failure. The majority (93%) of the study bulls passed one of up to three BSEs. There was a significant interaction between age and breed of bull at initial BSE. Identification of suitable peripubertal replacement animals that will improve herd reproductive performance remains a challenge for producers. There are several factors that can affect replacement animals’ ability to perform according to expectations at the beginning of the breeding season. Classification of heifers into categories that can predict performance during breeding season with reasonable confidence can assist producers in identifying heifers that complement the reproductive… Advisors/Committee Members: Robert L. Larson.

Subjects/Keywords: Breeding soundness evaluation; Theriogenology; Replacement heifer; Reproductive performance; Reproductive tract scoring

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APA (6th Edition):

Monday, J. D. (2017). Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35530

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Monday, Jessica Dawn. “Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35530.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Monday, Jessica Dawn. “Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds.” 2017. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Monday JD. Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35530.

Council of Science Editors:

Monday JD. Evaluation of peripubertal replacement breeding animals in beef herds. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35530

3. Amrine, David E. Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease.

Degree: PhD, Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, 2013, Kansas State University

Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly disease of cattle in US feedyards and diagnosis based on clinical signs of illness is challenging. Over the course of five independent studies we evaluated the precision of multiple observers assigning clinical illness scores (CIS) to calves with induced Mycoplasma bovis pneumonia. We also evaluated the accuracy of CIS in relation to lung lesions at necropsy. Agreement among observers over all five studies was slight ({kappa]= 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.24) and ranged from 0.10 to 0.21 for individual trials. The accuracy of CIS varied based on the pulmonary consolidation score chosen to represent a truly ill animal. Inflammation associated with BRD can lead to significant pulmonary damage and reduced lung function. Treatment for BRD frequently involves antimicrobial administration and occasionally non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We evaluated how calves experimentally challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica respond to treatment with flunixin meglumine, alone or in combination with the antimicrobial florfenicol. Individual calf response to bacterial pneumonia was highly variable in this study. None of the changes in serum biomarkers, CBC or chemistry parameters provided reliable indicators of the pulmonary inflammation associated with the mild severity of bronchopneumonia in our study. Metaphylaxis is frequently administered to manage the risk of BRD within cohorts of cattle. We evaluated the impact of metaphylactic antimicrobial administration 10 days prior to experimental Mannheimia haemolytica inoculation to mitigate pulmonary lesions. We found that calves receiving tildipirosin had less lung damage and fewer clinical signs of illness compared to calves treated with tulathromycin or saline. Finally, the ability to predict those animals that would not finish the production cycle normally would provide benefits in effectively managing cattle. We evaluated the ability of classification algorithms to accurately predict an individual calf’s outcome based on data available at first identification of and treatment for BRD. We found accuracy of classifiers was dependent on the data recorded by the feedyard and there are sub-groups of calves within feedyard populations where classifiers were highly accurate. These data suggest the importance of pairing the proper classifier with the data available. Advisors/Committee Members: Brad J. White and Robert L. Larson.

Subjects/Keywords: Bovine respiratory disease; Veterinary Medicine (0778)

…White, DVM, MSc a Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University… …State University, 1800 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA (An excerpt from full… …1800 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA c Department of Clinical Sciences, Kansas… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Amrine, D. E. (2013). Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16542

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Amrine, David E. “Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Kansas State University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16542.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Amrine, David E. “Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease.” 2013. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Amrine DE. Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2013. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16542.

Council of Science Editors:

Amrine DE. Diagnosis and management of bovine respiratory disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16542

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