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You searched for +publisher:"Kansas State University" +contributor:("Curtis Kastner"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kansas State University

1. McCollough, Bianca. Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry.

Degree: MS, Food Science Institute, 2016, Kansas State University

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) including Cyanobacteria and other toxic marine biota are responsible for similar harmful effects on human health, food safety, ecosystem maintenance, economic losses and liability issues for aquaculture farms as well as the food industry. Detection, monitoring and mitigation are all key factors in decreasing the deleterious effects of these toxic algal blooms. Harmful algal blooms can manifest toxic effects on a number of facets of animal physiology, elicit noxious taste and odor events and cause mass fish as well as animal kills. Such blooms can adversely impact the perception of the efficacy and safety of the food industry, water utilities, the quality of aquaculture and land farming products, as well as cause ripple effects experienced by coastal communities. HABs can adversely impact coastal areas and other areas reliant on local aquatic ecosystems through the loss of revenues experienced by local restaurants, food manufacturers as well as seafood harvesting/processing plants; loss of tourism revenue, decreased property values and a fundamental shift in the lives of those that are reliant upon those industries for their quality of life. This paper discusses Cyanobacteria, macroalgae, HABs, Cyanobacteria toxins, mitigation of HAB populations and their products as well as the ramifications this burgeoning threat to aquatic/ landlocked communities including challenges these toxic algae pose to the field of food science and the economy. Advisors/Committee Members: Curtis Kastner.

Subjects/Keywords: Cyanobacteria; Algal Toxin; Food Protection; Cyanotoxin; Domoic Acid

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCollough, B. (2016). Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCollough, Bianca. “Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCollough, Bianca. “Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry.” 2016. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McCollough B. Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32490.

Council of Science Editors:

McCollough B. Toxic algae and other marine biota: detection, mitigation, prevention and effects on the food industry. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32490

2. McClaskey, Jackie M. A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense.

Degree: PhD, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, 2014, Kansas State University

The U.S. agriculture industry is diverse and dynamic, plays a vital role in the nation’s economy, and serves as a critical component in providing the global food supply. Agriculture has and always will be susceptible to threats such as pests, disease, and weather, but it is also threatened by intentional acts of agroterrorism. One specific area of concern is foreign animal diseases (FAD) and the danger these diseases create for the U.S. livestock industry. Whether a disease outbreak is intentional or accidental, it could devastate animal agriculture and the food infrastructure and have a lasting impact on state, national, and global economies. One of the most economically devastating diseases that raise fear and anxiety in the livestock industry is foot and mouth disease (FMD). A number of administrative, regulatory, and legislative actions have been implemented at state and federal levels designed to protect the agriculture industry and to prevent, prepare for, and respond to an accidental or intentional introduction of an FAD. However, the consistency, clarity, and long-term commitment of these policy approaches remains in question. Effective policy decisions require a multidisciplinary approach that consider and balance science, economics, social factors, and political realities. A significant number of policy analysis tools exist and have been applied to animal emergency scenarios but few actually address the complexity of these policy dilemmas and provide information to policymakers in a format designed to help them make better decisions. Policy development needs to take a more multidisciplinary approach and better tools are needed to help decision makers determine the best policy choices. This dissertation analyzes three FAD policy dilemmas: mass euthanasia and depopulation, carcass disposal, and vaccination. Policy tools are developed to address the multidisciplinary nature of these issues while providing the information necessary to decision makers in a simple and useful format. Advisors/Committee Members: Curtis Kastner.

Subjects/Keywords: Agricultural policy; Foreign animal disease; Policy analysis; Agricultural biosecurity; Animal Sciences (0475); Economics, Agricultural (0503); Public Policy and Social Welfare (0630)

…most patient and supportive PhD committee you could ever meet – Drs. Curtis Kastner, Don… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McClaskey, J. M. (2014). A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/17048

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McClaskey, Jackie M. “A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Kansas State University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/17048.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McClaskey, Jackie M. “A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense.” 2014. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McClaskey JM. A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/17048.

Council of Science Editors:

McClaskey JM. A multidisciplinary policy approach to food and agricultural biosecurity and defense. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/17048

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