Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Kansas State University" +contributor:("Brad J. Behnke"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Kansas State University

1. Rand, Taylor Ann. Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer.

Degree: MS, Department of Kinesiology, 2018, Kansas State University

Introduction: Prostate tumor arterioles lack functional smooth muscle and have a diminished myogenic response. Previous research has demonstrated an enhanced prostate tumor blood flow and oxygenation associated with the augmented mean arterial pressure during exercise. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that elevations in the heart-to-prostate tumor hydrostatic gradient via adoption of the 70˚ head-up tilt (HUT) body position would enhance perfusion of the prostate tumor, which may improve tumor oxygenation and radiation therapy outcomes (Study I). Based upon those findings, we performed a secondary analysis (Study II) on previously published prostate hemodynamic responses to an identical tilt-test between young and aged animals. Methods: Study I: Dunning Cell AT-1 tumor cells (100,000) were injected into the ventral lobe of the prostate in male Copenhagen rats (4 mo.; n = 7). Four to six weeks after injection blood flow to the prostate tumor, kidneys, and soleus muscle was measured via the fluorescent microsphere technique in the supine and HUT position. Study II: A secondary analysis was performed on blood flow to the prostate (host tissue of the tumor) in young (6 mo.; n =9) and aged (24 mo.; n=7) male Fisher 344 rats from Ramsey et al., 2007 (39) to determine potential age-associated differences in conductance to this tissue. Results: Study I: No significant difference was observed in blood pressure between the two body positions. Compared to the supine posture, there was a significant reduction in blood flow to the soleus muscle. There was no difference in prostate tumor blood flow or vascular conductance between the supine and HUT position. Study II: In response to tilt, there was a significant reduction in prostate vascular conductance in young rats versus that in the supine posture (P<0.05). In the aged animals, there was no difference in prostate vascular conductance with tilt. Discussion: Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not see any significant differences in either blood flow or vascular conductance to the prostate tumor with manipulations in body position. Importantly, we believe this may be an age-associated effect. Given tumors both co-opt existing arterioles from the host tissue that retain vasomotor control and develop new vessels that lack functional smooth muscle, the enhanced vascular resistance in the prostate with young animals during tilt likely contributed to the lack of change in tumor perfusion with body position given the rats from study I were also young. Given the lack of change in vascular conductance in the prostate with tilt in aged animals, future studies should be performed in aged models of prostate cancer, of which currently there are no immunocompetent aged rodent models of prostate cancer. Advisors/Committee Members: Brad J. Behnke.

Subjects/Keywords: Prostate Cancer Tumor Perfusion

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rand, T. A. (2018). Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39407

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rand, Taylor Ann. “Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39407.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rand, Taylor Ann. “Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer.” 2018. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Rand TA. Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39407.

Council of Science Editors:

Rand TA. Effect of head up tilt on tumor perfusion in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39407


Kansas State University

2. Pyle, Joseph Gerard. Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia.

Degree: MS, Department of Kinesiology, 2019, Kansas State University

Introduction: Arterioles of solid tumors lack innervation and functional smooth muscle, severely limiting vasomotor control and myogenic response. Previous research has shown that increasing mean arterial pressure via an exercise bout acutely improves prostate tumor perfusion and decreases tumor hypoxia. We hypothesized that increasing prostate tumor perfusion pressure using a hydrostatic gradient introduced by 70-degree head-up tilt could also increase tumor perfusion and decrease hypoxia, which could be clinically adapted to improve radiotherapy outcomes. Methods: 10⁴ Dunning R3327 AT-1 rat prostate adenocarcinoma cells were injected directly into the ventral lobe of the prostate of male Copenhagen rats (age 6 months, n=11). Six to eight weeks following injection, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of hypoxic marker HypoxyprobeTM -1 and placed in either level (n=4) or 70-degree head-up tilt (n=7) condition. Tumors were removed and sectioned to be examined under microscope for HypoxyprobeTM -1 binding. Results: No significant difference was found in level of hypoxia between the level and 70-degree head-up tilt groups. Specifically, mean hypoxic cell count at supine was 1347 ± 271 and this did not change significantly in upright posture, which was 1410 ± 198 (P>0.05). Discussion: Contrary to our hypothesis we found no difference in tumor hypoxia between groups. This may be due to the age of the animals and the adoption of relatively healthy prostate arterioles during tumor development. Tumor vessels originate from vessels of healthy host tissue, which likely retain vasomotor and myogenic capability in young animals. The animals in this study were relatively young and likely restricted prostate blood flow and hence tumor blood flow in the head-up tilt condition. No immunocompetent aged rat prostate cancer model is currently available, future studies should focus on the development of this model, in order to accurately represent blood flow in host and tumor tissue. Advisors/Committee Members: Brad J. Behnke.

Subjects/Keywords: Kinesiology; Tumor Hypoxia

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pyle, J. G. (2019). Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/40049

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pyle, Joseph Gerard. “Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/40049.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pyle, Joseph Gerard. “Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia.” 2019. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Pyle JG. Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2019. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/40049.

Council of Science Editors:

Pyle JG. Effect of body position on prostate tumor hypoxia. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/40049

3. Baumfalk, Dryden Ray. Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass.

Degree: MS, Department of Kinesiology, 2018, Kansas State University

Prostate cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer found in men and preliminary evidence suggests prostate cancer has atrophic effects on cardiac and left ventricle (LV) mass which are associated with reduced endurance exercise capacity in rats. Using a pre-clinical orthotopic model of prostate cancer, echocardiography was utilized to test the hypothesis that exercise training will mitigate prostate cancer induced-cardiac and skeletal muscle atrophy and improve LV function versus sedentary tumor-bearing counterparts. Methods: Dunning R-3327 AT-1 prostate cancer cells were injected orthotopically in male Copenhagen rats aged (n=39; ~5 mo. old). Animals were randomized into four groups, exercise-trained tumor-bearing (EXTB) or control (EXCON) and sedentary tumor-bearing (SEDTB), or control (SEDCON). Exercise training was performed via a rodent treadmill set at 15m/min with a 15° incline for 60 min/day for ~30 days. Animals underwent echocardiographic evaluation using the parasternal short axis view to examine ventricle dimensions pre-cancer or exercise (PRE) and 15 (Post 1) and 30 (Post 2) days post cancer cell injection and/or exercise training with tissues collected immediately after Post 2. Results: Cardiac and LV mass of SEDTB animals were significantly lower than all groups (p<0.05). Tumor mass was significantly negatively correlated with LV mass in EXTB (-0.75, p<0.02) and SEDTB animals (-0.72, p<0.02). EXCON group had significantly higher stroke volume Post 2 assessment compared to both sedentary groups (p<0.05), but not EXTB animals. Conclusion: The current investigation demonstrates prostate cancer independent of anti-cancer treatment significantly reduces cardiac mass, and LV mass as well as locomotor muscle masses. However, moderate intensity exercise training can mitigate cardiac and skeletal muscle atrophy with prostate cancer. Advisors/Committee Members: Brad J. Behnke.

Subjects/Keywords: Prostate cancer; Skeletal muscle; Cardiac muscle; Left ventricular function; Exercise training

State University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and complied with the National… …Chapter 2 - Methods Animals The procedures performed in this study were approved by the Kansas… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baumfalk, D. R. (2018). Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39020

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baumfalk, Dryden Ray. “Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39020.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baumfalk, Dryden Ray. “Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass.” 2018. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Baumfalk DR. Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39020.

Council of Science Editors:

Baumfalk DR. Effects of prostate cancer and exercise training on left ventricular function and cardiac and skeletal muscle mass. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/39020

.