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You searched for +publisher:"Johns Hopkins University" +contributor:("Moss, William J"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Berg, Katrina Anne. Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

Malaria is the single, biggest cause of childhood mortality in Uganda. Efforts to increase access to first-line treatment, artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), for uncomplicated malaria have had a significant impact on their uptake. However, many people continue to engage in self-treatment and rely on non-ACT antimalarials. This dissertation aims to explore the facilitators and barriers to appropriate treatment-seeking behaviors and outcomes for childhood malaria in eastern Uganda. A synthesis of existing literature indicates that self-treatment is the preferred first step in the illness resolution process for suspected malaria, including treating suspected malaria with drugs stored at home or from a local drug shop. Initiating treatment in the formal sector is associated with receiving first-line treatment for malaria. Illness severity emerges as a primary determinant of seeking immediate care in a formal healthcare facility. Access and local illness concepts are identified as significant barriers to seeking appropriate, timely treatment. Overall, there existed a lack of complexity in the types of predictors used in previous research. A quantitative analysis was conducted to understand determinants of seeking care at various levels of the healthcare system. Attitudes and knowledge were associated with seeking care outside of the household. Illness severity and access were the most salient predictors of initiating care at a formal healthcare facility. A multilevel analysis explored the determinants of treatment outcomes for uncomplicated malaria, mainly use of first-line, nationally-recommended drugs. Caretakers continue to rely on non-ACT antimalarials for severe illness, children under five, and confirmed malaria. High levels of malaria knowledge and perceived efficacy in malaria-related services were associated with ACT-use. Findings from this research indicate that caretakers of young children continue to rely on self-treatment for non-serious malarial illness. Efforts should continue to maintain increased access to ACTs, especially in rural areas. National malaria control strategies and behavior change campaigns must target consumers to increase consumer utilization of formal healthcare facilities where diagnostics are available and encourage their sale in local drug shops. Education campaigns are recommended to increase treatment guideline awareness, malaria knowledge, and perceived efficacy in ACTs as well as malaria-related services within the healthcare system. Advisors/Committee Members: Moss, William J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Malaria; health-seeking behaviors; children under five; antimalarials; ACT

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Berg, K. A. (2014). Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berg, Katrina Anne. “Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berg, Katrina Anne. “Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda.” 2014. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Berg KA. Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Berg KA. Treatment Seeking Behaviors Among Caretakers Of Children With Suspected Malaria In Eastern Uganda. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Barffour, Maxwell Adusei. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

Background and objectives Evidence regarding the bidirectional interactions between iron or vitamin A status and malaria remains inconclusive. We assessed the longitudinal associations between iron (defined by ferritin) or vitamin A (defined by retinol) and malaria, assessed 6 months later by microscopy. Additionally, the changes in ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and retinol during malaria and/or inflammation (AGP >1 g/L) were estimated. Design We included 1024 children, 4-8 years old from Mkushi District, Zambia, participating in a 6-month trial, designed to evaluate the efficacy of a provitamin A intervention. We analyzed baseline (August, 2013) and endline (March, 2014) survey data, collected in the low and high malaria transmission seasons respectively. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) comparing endline malaria risk across baseline iron or vitamin A status using, modified Poisson regression, controlling for inflammatory changes in the indicators of iron and vitamin A at baseline. Results Inflammation alone was associated with changes of up to 66% in ferritin, up to 12% in sTfR, and up to -13% in serum retinol relative to their respective reference groups. Malaria with inflammation was associated with changes of up to 280% in ferritin, up to 40% in sTfR and up to -36% in retinol. After controlling for baseline inflammation, the IRR, comparing the low (0.7-1.05 µmol/L) and adequate (>1.05 µmol/L) vitamin A groups to the deficient group (<0.7 µmol/L) were 0.54 (95% CI: 0.24-1.17) and 0.47 (95% CI: 0.21-1.07) respectively for incident malaria, and 0.51 (95% CI 0.23-1.13) and 0.36 (CI: 0.16-0.85) respectively for incident malaria with inflammation. In children <72 months (but not older), the IRR for malaria among the moderate (≤ 75 µg/L but not deficient) and high (>75 µg/L) ferritin groups, relative to the deficient group (<12/15 µg/L depending on age), were 2.49 (95% CI: 0.97-6.40) and 3.27 (95% CI: 1.21-8.81) respectively. Conclusion Our data suggests that vitamin A adequacy may protect against malaria, whereas iron adequacy beyond some threshold may increase malaria risk. Our results also suggest that the concurrent assessment of malaria, in addition to inflammation, may enhance the interpretation of retinol, ferritin and sTfR in endemic regions. Advisors/Committee Members: Moss, William J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Malaria; Inflammation; Iron; Vitamin A

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barffour, M. A. (2014). INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/38008

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barffour, Maxwell Adusei. “INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/38008.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barffour, Maxwell Adusei. “INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN.” 2014. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Barffour MA. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/38008.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barffour MA. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MALARIA AND IRON OR VITAMIN A STATUS IN RURAL ZAMBIAN CHILDREN. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/38008

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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