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You searched for +publisher:"Johns Hopkins University" +contributor:("Gross, Steven"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Bae, Gi Yeul. Correspondence computations in visual cognition.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

15 behavioral experiments were conducted to investigate the role of object correspondence computations in visual cognition. Correspondence computations refer, here, to algorithms that identify relationships between objects in temporally separate encounters. In Experiment 1-5, I hypothesized that tracking failures occur because of correspondence failures during close encounters of targets and nontargets. To test this idea, I provided observers with different surface feature information to nontargets whenever they approached within 4° of a target (Experiment 1). This manipulation significantly improved performance by alleviating correspondence challenges. Two control experiments showed that this color change benefit is not merely due to target recovery (Experiment 2 and 4). A follow-up experiment measured the distance at which objects correspondence becomes challenging (Experiment 3). And an additional experiment demonstrated that the overall frequency of target-nontarget close encounters predict human performance (Experiment 5). Experiment 6-10 explored the role of object correspondence in the context of spatial working memory. Experiment 6 supplied evidence of object correspondences in a typical spatial working memory task through a trial specific analysis. In addition, a model that implements correspondence algorithms successfully predicted human performance without assuming any independent memory-related limits. Experiments 7 and 8 employed a preview display that indirectly provided information about memory location to be tested. This manipulation improved SWM performance dramatically (e.g. performance with 8 objects were comparable to 2 objects). A control experiment showed that the improved performance is not due to mere reactivation of memory representations (Experiment 9). Additional experiment showed that object colors do not support correspondence computations in this context. Experiment 11-15 employed integral features to prevent correspondence failures in a visual working memory task. I reasoned that integral features can be used to solve correspondence problems by preventing confusions between objects. Experiment 11 and 12 independently identified integral features using perceptual sorting experiments. When these features were used in change judgment tasks, working memory with two objects produced performance as precise as with one (Experiments 13-15). Taken together, these results suggest that object correspondence play a crucial role in the constraints typically observed in visual cognition. Advisors/Committee Members: Gross, Steven (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Visual cognition; visual working memory; multiple object tracking; correspondence problems; vision

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bae, G. Y. (2014). Correspondence computations in visual cognition. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37062

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bae, Gi Yeul. “Correspondence computations in visual cognition.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37062.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bae, Gi Yeul. “Correspondence computations in visual cognition.” 2014. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Bae GY. Correspondence computations in visual cognition. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37062.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bae GY. Correspondence computations in visual cognition. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37062

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Odic, Darko. Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

In this dissertation, I explore how linguistic representations (e.g., lexical and sentential meanings) interface and interact with the innately-specified core cognitive representations. In particular, I focus the interactions between lexical items that refer to objects versus substances (i.e., count-nouns, like ‘cow’, versus mass-nouns, like ‘beef’) and the universally shared non-linguistics quantity representations of approximate number and surface area. I find that while non-linguistic cognition differentiates between number and surface area quantification in terms of representational content (i.e., independent Weber fractions), these two quantification systems share a common representational format (i.e., Gaussian tuning curves on ratio scales). The interface between these systems and linguistic representations respects both this difference and this commonality: count- and mass-nouns tap into the distinction in content, with count-nouns mapping to number quantification, and mass-nouns primarily to area quantification, while the lexical meaning of ‘more’ interfaces with the common format, allowing children to immediately learn that ‘more’ refers to count- and mass-noun quantification. I demonstrate this through six experiments with both adults and children by utilizing the methods of formal semantics, psychophysics, eye-tracking, and cross-sectional developmental psychology. This work contributes to the broader issue of the relationship between language and thought, and attempts to form a bridge between the traditionally disparate fields of vision, language, and development. Advisors/Committee Members: Gross, Steven (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive development; semantics; psychophysics; approximate number eystem

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Odic, D. (2014). Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37991

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Odic, Darko. “Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37991.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Odic, Darko. “Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development.” 2014. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Odic D. Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37991.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Odic D. Objects and Substances in Vision, Language, and Development. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37991

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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