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You searched for +publisher:"Indiana University" +contributor:("Stager, Joel M"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. McCracken, Colleen Marie. DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? .

Degree: 2015, Indiana University

Introduction: Executive cognitive functions are known to decline with advancing age. However, Kramer and colleagues (1999) showed with a modest walking protocol (~45min/day, 3 times/wk; for 6 mo.), executive cognitive functions improved in inactive older adults. Select habitually active adults (Masters Swimmers) are known to maintain frequent participation in physical activity into late life (Tanaka and Wilson, 2003). The purpose of the study was to examine executive cognitive functions in Masters Swimmers and compare this to more typical inactive older adults. Methods: Thirty five (67.6yr ± 6.22) healthy, registered Masters Swimmers (MS) and thirty three (66.6 ± 5.33) self-reporting inactive controls (IC) completed Lifetime Historical Physical Activity Survey (LPHAS; Paffenbarger, 1978) to assess lifetime physical activity energy expenditures. Additionally, subjects performed three executive cognitive function tasks (Flanker, Task Switching, and Stopping). Results: Executive cognitive function was different (p < 0.05) between Masters Swimmers and controls for flanker task trials (incongruent and congruent) and task switching. No differences between groups were apparent for the stopping task. MS and IC were confirmed to be different (p > 0.05) in accumulated energy expenditure the most recent time periods (Past Year activity, and Over the age of 65 yr.), however no differences were evident in total lifetime physical activity LHPA (MS: 38,891 ± 20,287 kcal/wk, IC: 29,561 ± 26,777 kcal/wk). Conclusion: This study suggests that a lifetime of engagement in physical activity has cognitive protective benefits. These benefits might be due to differences in attention, speed of information processing, and perhaps low-level functioning. It is possible that a combination of these factors is responsible for the cognitive benefits demonstrated in this study. These findings lend support to engage in physical activity throughout the lifespan, especially in after the age of 65 yr. Advisors/Committee Members: Stager, Joel M (advisor).

…83 INDIANA UNIVERSITY… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCracken, C. M. (2015). DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? . (Thesis). Indiana University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19681

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCracken, Colleen Marie. “DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? .” 2015. Thesis, Indiana University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19681.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCracken, Colleen Marie. “DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? .” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McCracken CM. DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? . [Internet] [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19681.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McCracken CM. DOES LIFETIME ENGAGEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT EXECUTIVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS? . [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19681

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Indiana University

2. White, Joshua Childs. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .

Degree: 2010, Indiana University

Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, a new method, the Max Power Model, for assessing resistive (Fres) and propulsive (Fprop) forces using tethered swimming was developed. The Max Power Model (MPM) is based on the maximum power that a swimmer can deliver to an external load while swimming (Pmax) and its relationship with the maximum velocity of the swimmer (vmax). The development of the MPM was accomplished in three ways: examination of the shape of the Pmax vs. vmax curve, development of a method of comparing Pmax vs. vmax curves, and finally testing the sensitivity of the method to large changes using the four competitive strokes and underwater dolphin kicking. Second, the validity of the MPM was assessed by comparison with the Velocity Perturbation Model (VPM) and response to independent changes in Fres and Fprop during swimming (as supplied by a pocketed dragsuit, a wetsuit, hand paddles, fist gloves). Results: The MPM was developed effectively. The Pmax vs. vmax curve was found to be best described as an exponential function. Comparisons of Pmax vs. vmax curves were therefore made after linearization using the natural log of Pmax. If the slopes were similar, the comparisons were accomplished using ANCOVA with vmax as the covariate, otherwise a t-test for differences in slope was used. The MPM was sensitive to large changes in the swimming condition as seen through significant differences (p < 60; 0.05) in an ANCOVA for competitive stroke and a significantly different slope of ln(Pmax) vs. vmax for underwater dolphin kick in comparison with the competitive strokes. Assessment of the validity of the MPM yielded mixed results. The MPM showed a strong relationship to the VPM. However, the VPM showed no significant differences between any of the equipment treatment conditions in either the calculated Fres or the drag coefficient indicating an inability to detect small changes in Fres and Fprop. The MPM showed more promise, responding as expected to a majority of the equipment conditions. Conclusion: While still in need of further exploration and validation, the MPM has promise as a simple method to detect, separate, and quantify differences in Fres and Fprop during swimming. Advisors/Committee Members: Stager, Joel M (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sprint Swimming; Tethered Swimming; Active Drag; Swimming Propulsion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, J. C. (2010). Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . (Thesis). Indiana University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Joshua Childs. “Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .” 2010. Thesis, Indiana University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Joshua Childs. “Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .” 2010. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

White JC. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . [Internet] [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

White JC. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.