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You searched for +publisher:"IUPUI" +contributor:("Logrip, Marian"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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IUPUI

1. White, Shelby M. Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting.

Degree: 2019, IUPUI

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Impulsivity, or the tendency to act prematurely without foresight, has been linked to a diverse range of pathological conditions. Foresight refers to the ability to envision future rewards and events (i.e. prospectively sample) and has been associated with decreased impulsivity. One form of impulsivity is measured by the ability to delay gratification and is often studied in the framework of Delay Discounting (DD). DD provides the means to study impulsivity in a number of pathological conditions. However, whether impulsivity precedes the development of pathological states or results from the pathological state itself is not fully understood. This necessitates an understanding of neurobiological mechanisms contributing to decision making in both non-impulsive as well as impulsive populations of individuals. Animal models allow invasive techniques to be used to dissect the neurocircuitry involved in decision making. Given that the decision-making process is an ongoing process rather than an isolated event, optogenetics provide the temporal and spatial specificity necessary for evaluating brain region specific contributions to decision making in DD. In the present study, optogenetics were used to assess the contribution of the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC), a brain region involved in ‘goal-directed’ behavior, in the planning of future choices (i.e. prospective plans) and subsequent measures of impulsivity in an adjusting amount DD procedure. Optogenetic inhibition of mPFC was conducted in Wistar rats during different epochs of a DD task in order to assess how mPFC affects planning behavior in a population of rat not considered to be highly impulsive. Although no direct effects on planning behavior (e.g. consistency) were observed, inhibiting mPFC after a trial has been initiated and directly before a choice was made (Epoch 2) was observed to increase measures of impulsivity in comparison to days where no optogenetic manipulation occurred in a delay-specific manner. This suggests that mPFC differentially contributes to decision making at different delays. A pattern of associations between choice latency, impulsivity, and consistency began to emerge for inactivation occurring in Epoch 2, suggesting that mPFC contributes to some aspect of planning choices during this epoch. Moreover, these results indicate that mPFC is involved in decision making in Wistar Rats. Understanding the direct role that mPFC plays in promoting choices of delayed rewards provides a neurobiological target for treatment aimed at reducing impulsivity in the clinical population.

Advisors/Committee Members: Lapish, Christopher, Logrip, Marian, Czachowski, Cristine.

Subjects/Keywords: ArchT; mPFC; Delay Discounting; Impulsive Choice; Intertemporal Choice; Wistar; Impulsivity; Strategy; Prospection; Epoch-specific; Decision Making; Optogenetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, S. M. (2019). Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting. (Thesis). IUPUI. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Shelby M. “Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting.” 2019. Thesis, IUPUI. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Shelby M. “Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting.” 2019. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

White SM. Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting. [Internet] [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

White SM. Optogenetic Inhibition of the mPFC During Delay Discounting. [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


IUPUI

2. Houck, Christa A. Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake.

Degree: 2019, IUPUI

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Drinking despite aversive consequences, or compulsive drinking, is a criterion of alcohol use disorder and can be modeled in rodents by adding bitter quinine into alcohol. Previous studies have shown the development of quinine-resistant ethanol (EtOH) drinking following a drinking history, but used animals that achieved relatively low blood alcohol levels. Selectively bred crossed High Alcohol Preferring (cHAP) mice average over 250 mg/dl during a two-bottle choice procedure. Compulsive drinking is hypothesized to be D1-receptor mediated via the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). We hypothesized that 2 weeks of free-choice EtOH would lead to quinine resistance and intra-DLS infusion of a D1-antagonist, SCH23390, would attenuate quinine-resistant alcohol drinking with no effect on non-conflicted EtOH drinking. Infusion of SCH23390 into the DMS would not affect quinine-resistant drinking. cHAP mice had guide cannulae placed in the DLS or DMS and had either two weeks (2W) of EtOH and water two-bottle choice or were EtOH naïve (0W). Mice were infused with either SCH23390 or saline immediately prior to one 10% EtOH and water test day and SCH23390 did not disturb alcohol drinking. The following day, we adulterated the EtOH with 0.32-g/L quinine (0.89 mM), and mice received the same microinjection. For animals cannulated in the DLS, 2W history group infused with saline drank more quinine-adulterated EtOH than the 0W saline mice. While SCH23390 infused 0W animals looked no different from saline treated mice, it attenuated quinine + EtOH intake in the 2W animals to the level of 0W animals. Interestingly, DMS-cannulated mice demonstrated similar behavior, with SCH23390 reducing EtOH + quinine consumption, while leaving EtOH consumption undisturbed. Quinine resistance following 2 weeks of free-choice EtOH consumption is attenuated by acute administration of a D1-antagonist in the DLS, suggesting that an alcohol history induces compulsivity and that dopamine contributes to this behavior. This is unique to compulsive drinking, as non-conflicted EtOH drinking was unaffected.

Advisors/Committee Members: Grahame, Nicholas J., Boehm, Stephen L., Logrip, Marian L., Hopf, F. Woodward.

Subjects/Keywords: Quinine; Compulsivity; Selectively bred; Alcohol; Dopamine; Striatum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Houck, C. A. (2019). Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake. (Thesis). IUPUI. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18819

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Houck, Christa A. “Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake.” 2019. Thesis, IUPUI. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18819.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Houck, Christa A. “Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake.” 2019. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Houck CA. Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake. [Internet] [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18819.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Houck CA. Blockade of Striatal Dopamine D1 Receptors Reduces Quinine-Resistant Alcohol Intake. [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/18819

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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