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You searched for +publisher:"Harvard University" +contributor:("Wilson, William Julius"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Harvard University

1. Pittman, Cassi. Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks.

Degree: PhD, Sociology and Social Policy, 2012, Harvard University

The contemporary experience of race in America demands that blacks become astute observers of their surroundings, required to read subtle social, interactional and environmental cues to determine how to appropriately engage others in order to gain respect and social acceptance. Consumption objects, whether physical or material goods or services and experiences, are symbolic tools that blacks mobilize in order to define and assert themselves wherever they may be. Market research reveals that divergent patterns of consumption exist along racial lines. Blacks outspend whites in three central categories: apparel, personal care, and electronics and technology. Sociological research on consumption, however, has inadequately addressed how race influences blacks' consumption. Claims that blacks are conspicuous consumers are pervasive in both popular and academic works, and research indicates that blacks' consumption is, at least partially explained by status considerations, yet no comprehensive, empirically grounded theory exists to account for the contextually determined, symbolic and strategic use of goods by middle and working-class blacks. In my dissertation entitled “Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-class Blacks,” I offer an account of blacks' consumption that addresses this gap in the literature. I analyze qualitative interview data collected from 55 blacks residing in the New York City area, focusing on blacks' consumption preferences and practices in three social arenas: where they live, where they work, and where they play. Through examining middle and working-class blacks' consumption I show the ways that race remains salient in blacks' everyday lives; affecting their routine practices and marketplace interactions. Blacks differ as consumers as a consequence of a history of racial alienation, segregation, and discrimination in public settings, which has resulted in their use of goods to mitigate racial stigma, but distinct patterns of consumption emerge as blacks mobilize consumption objects to express and affirm their racial identities. This dissertation demonstrates that whether consumption goods are used to contest racial stigma or to express feelings of racial affinity, in both instances blacks' consumption preferences and practices reflect their reactions to the settings in which their consumption is enacted. Advisors/Committee Members: Wilson, William Julius (advisor), Lamont, Michele (committee member), Patterson, Orlando (committee member), Schor, Juliet (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: African Americans; sociology; consumption; race; race relations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pittman, C. (2012). Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9836713

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pittman, Cassi. “Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9836713.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pittman, Cassi. “Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks.” 2012. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Pittman C. Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9836713.

Council of Science Editors:

Pittman C. Race, Social Context, and Consumption: How Race Structures the Consumption Preferences and Practices of Middle and Working-Class Blacks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2012. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9836713


Harvard University

2. Rosen, Eva. The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2014, Harvard University

In the past two decades, changes in American housing policy have transformed the landscape of high-rise ghetto poverty. In its place, has emerged what I call the horizontal ghetto, where high-rise public housing has been demolished and poverty is turned on its side, spreading across the cityscape. Researchers are now beginning to document the reconcentration of voucher holders in moderately poor neighborhoods. This dissertation examines how residents come to live in this type of neighborhood, and how this new context shapes social organization for those who reside within it. I examine a case study neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore called Park Heights, in which I conducted 15 months of ethnographic fieldwork and 102 in-depth interviews. This neighborhood has a large population of working class black families who settled there in the late 1960's, a recent influx of voucher holders, and also a population of residentially unstable unassisted renters. I examine two complementary explanations for how and why voucher holders end up in neighborhoods like Park Heights. I propose that the landlord is an important piece of the puzzle; landlord practices sort the most disadvantaged voucher holders into some of the most disadvantaged neighborhoods, serving as a mechanism in the reproduction of spatial inequality and the concentration of poverty. I also consider how residents' experiences in contexts like Park Heights shape their decisions to remain in, and move to similar neighborhoods. Finally, I examine how the neighborhood context shapes social organization, and I argue that although poverty may be more moderate than in neighborhoods dominated by large-scale public housing, the horizontal context of instability and clustered voucher use may have deleterious consequences for social relations.

Sociology

Advisors/Committee Members: Waters, Mary C. (advisor), Edin, Kathryn (committee member), Lamont, Michèle (committee member), Wilson, William Julius (committee member), Desmond, Matthew (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; housing policy; poverty; urban sociology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rosen, E. (2014). The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274202

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rosen, Eva. “The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274202.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rosen, Eva. “The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era.” 2014. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Rosen E. The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274202.

Council of Science Editors:

Rosen E. The Rise of the Horizontal Ghetto: Poverty in a Post-public Housing Era. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2014. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274202

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