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You searched for +publisher:"Harvard University" +contributor:("Mapp, Karen L."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Harvard University

1. Cuevas, Stephany. Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success.

Degree: 2018, Harvard University

Educational research has highlighted the importance of parental engagement in Latina/o students’ post-secondary planning and success; when parents develop their children’s college-going identities early, students are more likely to attend a 4-year institution (Tierney & Auerbach, 2005; Zarate, Saenz, & Oseguera, 2011). Little is known, however, about how Latina/o parents’ immigration status influences their engagement. Existing scholarship has demonstrated that an undocumented status, or parents’ “illegality,” not only limits access to resources, but also adds a layer of distrust, discomfort, and fear of social institutions (De Genova, 2002; Dreby, 2015; Enriquez, 2015; Gonzales 2010, 2011; Yoshikawa, 2011). This phenomenological qualitative study explores the engagement of 15 undocumented Latina/o parents whose children were successfully admitted and matriculated to Coast University (pseudonym), a prestigious public institution in California. Using in-depth qualitative interview data, this dissertation explores the different stages of parents’ role in their children’s’ post-secondary planning and success and the ways their “illegality” and other factors (i.e. access to resources, connections to social networks, relationships with schools) shape these. Specifically, this study explores how undocumented Latina/o parents describe and make sense of their sacrificios (sacrifices) and apoyo (support), which I argue are essential components of their role in their children’s post-secondary planning and success. As such, this study shows how undocumented Latina/o parents’ engagement is apoyo sacrificial (sacrificing support), or an engagement that is shaped and bounded by the limitations of their “illegality.” Though bounded by the limitations of their immigration status, undocumented Latina/o parents are intentional about their parenting behaviors—they engage in parenting practices that support their children’s goals and aspirations despite the limitations they face. This dissertation makes a unique contribution to education and family engagement literature, as it connects the important, underexplored, and under theorized experiences of Latina/o families and communities to conversations on higher education access and success. This study focuses not only on the political and educational barriers undocumented Latina/o parents face, but also examines the critical and intentional ways in which parents respond to these.

Latina/o family engagement; post-secondary access; mixed-status families; higher education; undocumented parents

Advisors/Committee Members: Gonzales, Roberto G., Mapp, Karen L., Savitz-Romer, Mandy.

Subjects/Keywords: Education, Higher; Education, General

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cuevas, S. (2018). Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success. (Thesis). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37935837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cuevas, Stephany. “Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success.” 2018. Thesis, Harvard University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37935837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cuevas, Stephany. “Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success.” 2018. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Cuevas S. Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success. [Internet] [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37935837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cuevas S. Apoyo Sacrificial, Sacrificing Support: Understanding Undocumented Latina/o Parents’ Engagement in Students’ Post-Secondary Planning and Success. [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2018. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37935837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Horne, Michael A. Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas.

Degree: 2018, Harvard University

Twenty-first century K-12 education leaders are increasingly positioned as critical levers in transforming chronically underperforming schools and school systems. Efforts to enhance student and school performance however have narrowly centered around standardized test scores. Education leadership has similarly been reinterpreted as developing systems and structures optimized for improving students’ assessment performance. This narrow vision of education and model of leadership practice, while popular, is inconsistent with well-documented evidence that supports students’ cognitive and social-emotional development to increase positive life outcomes. This is a study of three K-12 black male education leaders in southern Dallas, a geographic area that is educationally and economically under-resourced, whom have chosen to advance a vision of education rooted in social change. Using portraiture as my research methodology, this study examined the following questions: how do three K-12 black male education leaders in southern Dallas conceptualize their role as leaders? How do the social, political, and historical contexts within which they reside inform the leaders’ professional and personal identities? Using semi-structured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis, the data derived from this study expands our understanding of how black education leaders translate their values into action. This study builds upon existing leadership theory and research on transformational leadership, black political leadership, and social justice leadership to explore how the leaders' lived experiences inform their leadership practice. Using semi-structured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis, the data derived from this study deepens our perception of the ways black education leaders advance their visions of social transformation. Upon examination of the leaders’ narratives, this study finds that the leaders prioritized their constituents’ well-being above their own advancement when responding to persistent social, political, and economic inequality in southern Dallas. This leadership choice aligns to historical models of servant leadership and black social movement leadership. Additionally, the leaders have created school environments shaped by a belief in supporting the whole child, not just improving test scores. Despite their commitment to social change and early indicators of success, the leaders were unable to fully reject the technocratic approach to education leadership underscoring the complexity of transformational education leadership. As policy makers and practitioners work to address persistent academic underperformance, this study helps us critically explore the convergence between transformational and technocratic leadership. Moreover, this study helps elevate black leaders’ voices whom have largely been absent from the dominant education discourse.

education leadership; K-12; transformational leadership

Advisors/Committee Members: Lawrence-Lightfoot, Sara, Mapp, Karen L., Warren, Mark R..

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Horne, M. A. (2018). Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas. (Thesis). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37679923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Horne, Michael A. “Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas.” 2018. Thesis, Harvard University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37679923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Horne, Michael A. “Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas.” 2018. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Horne MA. Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas. [Internet] [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37679923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Horne MA. Leadership for Social Transformation: Portraits of Three K-12 Black Male Education Leaders in Southern Dallas. [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2018. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37679923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Harvard University

3. Cuevas, Stephany. Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review.

Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD), 2016, Harvard University

Subjects/Keywords: Education, Sociology of; Education, Guidance and Counseling; Education, Higher

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cuevas, S. (2016). Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33797237

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cuevas, Stephany. “Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33797237.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cuevas, Stephany. “Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review.” 2016. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Cuevas S. Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33797237.

Council of Science Editors:

Cuevas S. Understanding Latina/o Undocumented Parents’ Engagement in Students’ College Readiness: A Literature Review. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2016. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33797237

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