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You searched for +publisher:"Harvard University" +contributor:("Angrist, Joshua"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Harvard University

1. Robles, Silvia Ceballos. Three Essays on Access to Higher Education.

Degree: PhD, 2016, Harvard University

The first essay estimates the impact of a challenging, six-week-long summer program for rising high school seniors that is hosted annually at a selective private university which graduates a majority of its students in a science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) field. Using applications to the program between 2005 and 2011, and records from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) and 31 universities, the analysis explores the effect of the summer program on college application, admission, matriculation, and STEM major rates. Records from the summer pro- gram’s selection process reduce bias when using OLS regression and propensity score techniques. The estimates show admission to the summer program increased enrollment at the host institution by 30 percentage points, and shifted students from less selective universities. There were no detectable differences in graduation rates, and STEM major rates increased. This indicates that interventions preceding college application season can influence application and enrollment at selective universities, and that matriculation and major choices are coupled in ways that are important for increasing STEM access. The second essay uses data from a randomized trial of three programs: the six-week summer program explored in the first chapter, a one-week version of the same program, and a program that takes place online over six months. Applicants in 2014 and 2015 were randomly assigned to one of the three programs or a control. Early results from surveys and host institution (HI) records confirm a large effect of the six-week program on application rates at the HI. The programs also improved application strategy beyond inducing application to the HI. For early outcomes such as college application and acceptance rates, there were no sharp distinctions between the one-week, online, and six-week treatments. If later outcomes do not diverge, this will have future policy implications. The third essay measures the effect of oversubscribed courses at a community college using a fuzzy regression discontinuity (FRD). The FRD relies on reconstructed enrollment queues, and exploits the discontinuity in enrollment at the waitlist cutoff. Using data from a large community college and the NSC, findings indicate that students substitute for unavailable courses with other courses in the same subject. We find no significant effects on later performance or transfer to other colleges.

Economics

Advisors/Committee Members: Angrist, Joshua (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Economics; Labor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robles, S. C. (2016). Three Essays on Access to Higher Education. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33493321

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robles, Silvia Ceballos. “Three Essays on Access to Higher Education.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33493321.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robles, Silvia Ceballos. “Three Essays on Access to Higher Education.” 2016. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Robles SC. Three Essays on Access to Higher Education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33493321.

Council of Science Editors:

Robles SC. Three Essays on Access to Higher Education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2016. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33493321


Harvard University

2. Cohodes, Sarah Rose. Essays on the Economics of Education.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Harvard University

This dissertation includes three essays in the field of economics of education. The first essay provides estimates of the long-run impacts of tracking high-achieving students using data from a Boston Public Schools (BPS) program, Advanced Work Class (AWC). AWC is an accelerated curriculum in 4th through 6th grades with dedicated classrooms. Using a fuzzy regression discontinuity approach based on the AWC entrance exam, I find that AWC has little impact on test scores. However, it improves longer-term academic outcomes including Algebra 1 enrollment by 8th grade, AP exam taking, and college enrollment. The college enrollment effect is particularly large for elite institutions. Testing potential channels for program effects provides suggestive evidence that teacher effectiveness and math acceleration account for AWC effects, with little evidence that peer effects contribute to gains. The second essay uses item-level information from standardized tests to investigate whether large test score gains attributed to Boston charter schools can be explained by score inflation. To do so, I estimate the impact of charter school attendance on subscales of the test scores and examine them for evidence of score inflation. If charter schools are teaching to the test to a greater extent than their counterparts, one would expect to see higher scores on commonly tested standards, higher stakes subjects, and frequently tested topics. However, despite incentives to reallocate effort toward highly-tested content, and to coach to item type, I find no evidence of this type of test preparation. Boston charter middle schools perform consistently across all standardized test subscales. The third essay analyzes a Massachusetts merit aid program that gives high-scoring students tuition waivers at in-state public colleges with lower graduation rates than available alternative colleges. A regression discontinuity design comparing students just above and below the eligibility threshold finds that students are remarkably willing to forgo college quality and that scholarship use actually lowered college completion rates. These results suggest that college quality affects college completion rates. The theoretical prediction that in-kind subsidies of public institutions can reduce consumption of the subsidized good is shown to be empirically important.

Public Policy

Advisors/Committee Members: Avery, Christopher xmlui.authority.confidence.description.cf_uncertain (advisor), Angrist, Joshua (committee member), Katz, Lawrence (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Economics, Labor; Education, General

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cohodes, S. R. (2015). Essays on the Economics of Education. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17467388

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cohodes, Sarah Rose. “Essays on the Economics of Education.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17467388.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cohodes, Sarah Rose. “Essays on the Economics of Education.” 2015. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cohodes SR. Essays on the Economics of Education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17467388.

Council of Science Editors:

Cohodes SR. Essays on the Economics of Education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2015. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17467388

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