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You searched for +publisher:"Georgia Tech" +contributor:("Ying Song"). One record found.

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Georgia Tech

1. Lawson, Alison N. Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

The effects of two types of cryopreservation, conventional freezing and vitrification, on the in vitro and in vivo function of a pancreatic substitute were investigated. Conventional freezing uses low concentrations of cryoprotective agents (CPAs), slow cooling and rapid warming and allows ice formation. Vitrification requires high concentrations of CPAs coupled with rapid cooling and warming to achieve a vitreous, or ice-free, state. A previously published mathematical model describing the mass transfer of CPAs through the alginate matrix of the substitute and the cell membrane was expanded to incorporate heat transfer as well as CPA cytotoxicity. Our results indicate that temperature of exposure is the most critical parameter for the proper design of CPA addition and removal protocols. The use of a mathematical model is critical to ensure CPA equilibration and minimize CPA exposure. Properly designed CPA addition and removal protocols were used for vitrification. The effects of cryopreservation on the biomaterial and the cellular function of a pancreatic substitute consisting of murine insulinomas encapsulated in calcium alginate/poly-L-lysine/alginate beads were assessed. In vitro results indicate that both vitrification and conventionally frozen perform comparably to fresh. However, in vivo studies reveal that vitrified beads perform worse than both conventionally frozen and fresh beads. With adjustments, it may be possible to improve the performance of the vitrified beads. Nevertheless, for this pancreatic substitute, conventional freezing is the better method and allows successful cryopreservation. Advisors/Committee Members: Athanassios Sambanis (Committee Chair), Hang Lu (Committee Member), Lakeshia Taite (Committee Member), Susan Safley (Committee Member), Ying Song (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cryopreservation; Pancreatic substitute; Encapsulation; Diabetes; Vitrification; Cryopreservation of organs, tissues, etc.; Artificial pancreas; Tissue engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lawson, A. N. (2011). Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39540

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lawson, Alison N. “Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39540.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lawson, Alison N. “Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute.” 2011. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lawson AN. Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39540.

Council of Science Editors:

Lawson AN. Cryopreservation effects on the in vitro and in vivo function of a model pancreatic substitute. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39540

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